Deep Frying In Tallow

edited March 2014 in Bulletproof Diet

I've started cooking with tallow recently, and it's awesome, so I've been thinking about buying a deep fryer.


Apparently the way deep frying works, if done correctly - ie the heat is hot enough - is the food gets dropped into a hot oil, which then makes the moisture in the item steam out, creating a layer between the oil and the food. 


If the oil isn't hot enough, the stuff just absorbs the oil cause the steam doesn't happen I guess, but if you're using grass-fed tallow, even that isn't a problem from a health perspective. It might just suck culinary wise.


You can even filter and reuse tallow up to four times, which is pretty good. Some deep fryers even have built in filters that do that for ya.


So, other than the heat thing, is there any other things that would make deep frying in grass-fed tallow not so bulletproof?


Comments

  • StevoStevo Upgrade in Progress

    Oxidised fat. If you use the same fat over and over it would eventually end up quite bad.


  • SystemSystem mod
    edited March 2014

    Oxidized fats cause inflammation, right?




    Oxidised fat. If you use the same fat over and over it would eventually end up quite bad.



  • edited March 2014

    Tallow is 100% saturated fat, which is stable at high temperatures, and is highly resistant to heat and oxidation (due to being saturated).


    I plan to deep fry things at around 375 degrees F, which  is way below it's smoke point of beef tallow (420 degrees F).


    I think maybe what it does to things I fry could be bad for you, but I don't think the oxidation of the fats is an issue here.


    What does rapidly cooking sweet potato at 375 in its own steam do to the sweet potato? 


  • StinkoStinko
    edited March 2014

    I'm planning on getting a deep fryer, and using tallow also...I'll probably keep to 350F


     


    If you use the healthy saturated oils, I can find nothing horrible about the cooking method. The mechanics of deep frying: the hot fat essentially creates a barrier so the water inside has difficulty escaping and basically steam cooks the food. The steam generated, also in-turn creates a barrier against the oil and keeps the food from becoming permeated with the oil. (must be hot enough...if lower than 350F oil can permeate the food more)


     


    I'm surprised everyone here seems so against it.....seems like a hold over from our preconceived notions that anything deep-fried is unhealthy....(Newsflash! Most people think you're insane when you put a spoonful of "unhealthy" butter in your coffee too)


     


     


    Here's an interesting article on it.  I don't agree with everything in it; but the part where he mentions that regular pan frying usually produces more carcinogenic HCA's than deep-frying was interesting. 


    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/can-fried-food-be-healthy/#axzz2wXsrHJFI


  • StevoStevo Upgrade in Progress


    Tallow is 100% saturated fat




    =====


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tallow#Composition

  • So are you saying that tallow isn't bulletproof? and also, ive cooked a couple steaks in my homemade lamb tallow, on low temp, very fast sear, not long cooking time, is that not a good idea to use tallow for that? Like just spread it on the top of a cooked steak for flavor kind of thing? I know making it in general requires a couple hours of steady low temp heat.


  • StinkoStinko
    edited March 2014

    I don't think you can get much more BP than things like Tallow etc... But he's right, it's about 40% MUFA; which is fine. (coconut oil is actually the highest ratio of saturated: about 90%) Important thing is tallow, like all animal fats, are extremely low in PUFA.


     


     




    So are you saying that tallow isn't bulletproof? and also, ive cooked a couple steaks in my homemade lamb tallow, on low temp, very fast sear, not long cooking time, is that not a good idea to use tallow for that? Like just spread it on the top of a cooked steak for flavor kind of thing? I know making it in general requires a couple hours of steady low temp heat.



  • edited March 2014

    Oh, my bad. Ok.


    Tallow still has a smoke point of 420 degrees F though. But I guess that doesn't mean the other fats in it won't oxidize, right?


    Would it be be better to deep fry in coconut oil?


  • deep frying isn't BP...thats all there is to it. It uses the same oil over and over which degrades after time. Sure...if you used your expensive rendered tallow once in a deep fryer well below smoke, it may not be too bad for you...but why waste it? I have a ton of leaf lard in my freezer and it takes so much effort and time to render, I haven't gotten around to doing it so that I can use it occasionally. ah well...thats for another thread! 


     


    In any case, deep frying isn't BP if you are following it strictly...however, if you are still eating red zone, scrambling your eggs but are moving towards being more BP...there are worse things you could do than deep fry in tallow below smoke point once or twice!


    Help me get my blog up and running...check it out for recipes and info

    http://adventuresintheuncommon.wordpress.com

     

  • StinkoStinko
    edited March 2014

    Interesting fact:


     


    Deep frying originated in Egypt as far back as 2500BC.  Cool eh?


     


    People have fried in Coconut oil; it's super stable. (most stable there is) 


    A refined coconut oil has higher smoke point, and I've read is the recommended type to use for frying.


     


    And like other people mentioned, it's not technically BP; but in my opinion there are far worse things you can do.


     


    Tallow is extremely stable, and very low on PUFA. It's probably the best animal fat to use for deep frying. Use it at 350F-375F max, and you're staying well below smoking point.


     


    Interesting chart: Tallow highly resistant to oxidation. (not quite as resistant as coconut oil )

    http://www.clovegarden.com/ingred/oi_cookz.html




    Oh, my bad. Ok.


    Tallow still has a smoke point of 420 degrees F though. But I guess that doesn't mean the other fats in it won't oxidize, right?


    Would it be be better to deep fry in coconut oil?



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