Glucose Hacking (And Tracking) With Oxaloacetate/upgraded Aging

I've been taking daily fasting glucose readings over the past 7 months, both with and without oxaloacetate/Upgraded Aging and wrote up my results here.


 


tl;dr - oxaloacetate works (for me) by both lowering and more tightly stabilizing day-to-day fasting glucose levels, but only in conjunction with some short-duration, intense physical activity a few times per week.


 


Since a picture is worth a thousand words, here's a chart showing my initial 30-day baseline daily fasting glucose levels, then 30 days after supplementing with oxaloacetate. The thick orange line is a 7-day moving average:


 


Comments

  • You are doing good work man.  When is Dave going to make you a BP ambassador?


  • Are you eating a relatively ketogenic diet during this entire period?  I have perpetual concerns about high (~100) fasting blood glucose despite eating a limited (>50g) amount of carbs per day.  Do you have any thoughts about the red period approximately 3/4 of the way though your trial?  It seemed that oxaloacetate was helpful for a bit but something else happened.  


     


    Thank you so much for bringing real data to the table.  This makes the conversations so much more interesting.  


     


     


    FYI - I am currently conducting a very similar trial using pterostilbene.  When I have an appropriate amount of data I'll post a graph.  

  • edited April 2014


    Are you eating a relatively ketogenic diet during this entire period?  I have perpetual concerns about high (~100) fasting blood glucose despite eating a limited (>50g) amount of carbs per day.  Do you have any thoughts about the red period approximately 3/4 of the way though your trial?  It seemed that oxaloacetate was helpful for a bit but something else happened.  


     


    Thank you so much for bringing real data to the table.  This makes the conversations so much more interesting.  


     


     


    FYI - I am currently conducting a very similar trial using pterostilbene.  When I have an appropriate amount of data I'll post a graph.  




     




     


    In terms of diet, I've been 99.8% BP for the past 1.5 years so yes, my diet is ketogenic (most days under 50g-75g carbs) - however, when I began the experiment I was also doing intermittent fasting 5-6 days/week but about a month in I cut back to maybe 2 days/week because I'm working on fixing my thyroid/adrenals and wanted to reduce the stress I was putting on my body. The red area on my chart during my initial 30-day period simply reflected days I didn't take oxaloacetate (I ran out and it took a few days to get more).


     


    Very cool that you are doing a similar experiment. Looking forward to seeing how it goes!


  • edited January 2015

    Thanks for the information Quantified Bob, did you notice any differences in what time of day you take the OAA and/or if you took it with/without food?  Is there an ideal schedule for this that will maximize the effect?  How about stacking with nootropics and/or taking in the AM with my BP coffee; better or less effective?


     


    I did a google search for "oxaloacetate stack" and came across a study that noticed a decline in effectiveness in mice when it was mixed with the food.  Basically I think the results were inconclusive.  I didn't dig too deep, thought maybe one of the advanced members might have some guidance here.


     


    thanks, take care




  • Thanks for the information Quantified Bob, did you notice any differences in what time of day you take the OAA and/or if you took it with/without food?  Is there an ideal schedule for this that will maximize the effect?  How about stacking with nootropics and/or taking in the AM with my BP coffee; better or less effective?




     


    I always took my OAA at the same time (with breakfast, or if IM fasting after my BP coffee) so don't have a comparison with taking it at other times during the day. However, I do know some people who take a second capsule with dinner, and others who take it right before exercise/competition for a quick performance boost (see Ben Greenfield's post and the Quantified Body podcast interview with Alan Cash, the inventor of Upgraded Aging).

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