Bone Broth

I am surprised of the lack of talk about bone broth on this site. I know it takes a long time to make, but the number of health benefits that it has is amazing plus it is a very cheap(I get my fish head for free) way to get collagen and magnesium especially if you make fish broth. If you don't have the time the supplements will help you out but I believe the cost/performance is much better if you take 5 hours on the weekend to make a bone broth.
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Comments

  • Hey,

    I think that the guys are concerned about the risk of oxidising the MUFA in the animal fat from boiling it for so long.



    Not sure that i've ever heard anything definitive on it though and oxidising MUFA is a risk that is against the traditional dogma on oxidisation risk.
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  • I'd like to try it. Chris Kresser says he skims the fat off the top of his bone broth to remove the oxidized fats.
  • I will be making my third batch today. It is simmered, not boiled. http://thenourishing...f-stock-anyone/



    I cook mine up slow for at least 24 hours until the small bones, like chicken drumsticks and ribs are falling apart. I have my family save all of the bones from meals. And I buy grass fed knuckle bones as well.



    Don't forget the vinegar. It helps to draw out the minerals from the bones.



    I also have collagen I purchased from Upgraded Self. I use it too. But the bone broth tastes so much better.



    I have IBS, so bone broth and collagen is great for my gut especially.



    I always have a hard time skimming fat. I wait until it is refrigerated and then it is a cinch.





    Tracy
  • I soak my grass fed bones in water, apple cider vinegar, and a tablet of vitamin C for four hours. Then I simmer them for about 24 hours on low low heat. Place it in the fridge and pull off the fat. I use this broth to boil veggies...simmer meats...make soups...blend with raw egg yolks...pour over rice…blend with cooked veggies and butter…etc….



    What is the best way to make bone broth? Which method is most bulletproof?



    Thanks!
  • good to know i can do something with my chicken carcasses! last night, after baking a chicken and stripping its meat, i threw bones/carcass (and some skin that was too rich for sandwiches/chicken salad) into a pot of boiling water (along with some pork bones from pulled pork i had made image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' /> )

    it's been on a light simmer all night/afternoon, am about to do...something with it! glad i found this thread for some suggestions! am thinking of throwing some kale in and making soup like that image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />



    any rough nute stats for a 'concentrated' broth? as in, how good a source of collagen is this?
  • MaverickAzzMaverickAzz Powerful
    'Tracy wrote:


    I always have a hard time skimming fat. I wait until it is refrigerated and then it is a cinch.


    Skim the surface with a paper towel. image/icon_cool.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':cool:' />

    No sorcery, just science. 

  • how do you get the fat off the paper towel?
  • MaverickAzzMaverickAzz Powerful


    how do you get the fat off the paper towel?


    Throw it in the bin. Didn't think anyone wanted to keep it?

    No sorcery, just science. 

  • I dont skim the fat. I mix it with butter, brocolli, extra meat, and maybe some raw-milk cheese.



    Best soup ever.
  • 'Aaron wrote:


    Throw it in the bin. Didn't think anyone wanted to keep it?


    i did. am trying to gain weight.. image/icon_redface.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':oops:' />
  • edited January 2013
    can anyone elaborate on why keeping the top is a bad idea? or get more specific about temperature causing issues if too high?

    have some broth bubblin right now! last week did maybe 5hr of light-boil, strained it, boiled rice in it, then added a can of tomato paste and a ton of medium-chopped kale. was in.cred.ib.le.

    (edit- oh yeah, probably ~1stick of butter and a hefty dose of salt were added at the end image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' /> )
  • M. ThomasM. Thomas A Stick of Butter a Day Keeps the Doctor Away.

    The fat is oxidized.  Subjecting something to heat increases the likely hood of oxidation.  Rapidly heating greatly increases this chance and comparably very low amounts of heat for very long periods of time has the same effect.




  • The fat is oxidized. Subjecting something to heat increases the likely hood of oxidation. Rapidly heating greatly increases this chance and comparably very low amounts of heat for very long periods of time has the same effect.



    What about proteins, will this denaturing prosess make them inflammatory?
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  • M. ThomasM. Thomas A Stick of Butter a Day Keeps the Doctor Away.
    edited March 2013

    The denaturing process is different from oxidation. Its not so much a statistical event based on the collisional interactions with other molecules as it is a dependency on enough over all thermal energy to cause the protein structures to overcome the forces keeping the protein folded together in their secondary and tertiary structures. Because of this I think denatured proteins are less of a concern but I could be wrong.



    Obviously if no denaturation occurred than you would not be cooking your food - there are different degrees of this I suppose. Denaturing of proteins is usually marked by some temperature threshold. Below that threshold it doesn't happen but past that threshold it does happen. While oxidative events can happen at low temperatures, just less likely. As you increase the temperature you shift to a more and more likelihood of the oxidation occurrence and there is no discrete threshold where the occurrence suddenly jumps to a very high likelihood like in the case of protein denaturation. At least this is my interpretation of these ideas, which is limited since my study in biochemistry is only a hand full of years.


    Maybe Aaron Lorch can shed some light on these fundamentals.


  • I love the idea of having bone broth and have some grass fed bones on the way.  I am trying to eat no vegetables that are starchy.  That recipe Tracy brought to our attention uses some no nos.  I like the idea of broccoli stems maybe leeks, any other ideas?


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