Nutritional Benefits Of Herbs In The Bp Diet.

NickatNickat
edited June 2014 in Bulletproof Diet

Okay so this is obvious but thought it useful to put down here. There has been much talk of raw milk, kefir and the lack calcium in our diet on the forum lately and that got us thinking.


No doubt fresh vegetables and meats can give us nutritional benefits but what about dried and fresh herbs used to flavour them?


 


Surprisingly some can add nutritional values by quite alot. Just a tablespoon of ground thyme, for example, gives about 80mg of calcium. Ground oregano at 86mg or there abouts, slightly more. Not bad values at all.


 


The drying process with longer periods of storage time will eventually deplete these nutritional values but they still have nutritional worth. So what of fresh herbs?


 


Just an ounce of fresh Basil gives 88mg of omega 3 fatty acids and contains Vitamins A, K and C.


Dried Basil has 33mg of the same omega 3 fatty acid with lesser amounts of the same vitamins.


Both pretty good if used daily. Unfortunately the longer the fresh herb is refrigerated, the further the values deplete.


Makes us want to start a herb garden. These are just a few examples of how we can further add nutrients in our diet.


 


Post your favorite herbs, be it fresh or dried with a short note regarding it`s benefits.


e.g. anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and that type of thing.


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Comments

  • Jason HooperJason Hooper ✭✭✭
    edited June 2014

    My two favorite herbs are ginger and cilantro.


     


    Ginger is a member of the rhizome family (like turmeric, bamboo, carnivora).  It is very easy to grow.  You can just buy some from the store, put it in the ground, and wait a year.  It has a nice, zesty flavor and goes well in stir-fry, teas, and beer.  It is a powerful anti-microbial and anti-oxidant.


     


    Cilantro (coriander) is an annual herb in the apiaceae family (parsley, celery, carrots).  It is also easy to grow and self-seeds.  Many people grow this plant indoors because it does not require a lot of sunlight, but do not harvest too much, or you will kill it.  Cilantro, avocado, and lime juice are the staples in a good guacamole!  It also goes great in a stir-fry.  It is an excellent, natural detoxifier.  It is also anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, great for the gut, good for the eyes, immune system, and helps regulate blood sugar.  Cilantro is probably the best herb out there and should be in everyone's garden.


  • @ Jason... how much cilantro do you have to use for "detox" effects?


     


    I love rosemary, thyme, tarragon, dill, turmeric, and ginger in my eggs.....


  • CycloneCyclone rich in satisfats
    I would never eat that much of any of those herbs in a meal though. But yeah, they do add some nutrition aswell as flavor.
  • NickatNickat
    edited June 2014

    Fresh parsley and cilentro salad with lemon and spring onions is a great base for lightly tossed seafood on top as an intro. Wow it's awesome and think of the nutritional benefits.


  • NickatNickat
    edited June 2014

    @Megs1768



     


    Herbs can be used in additional to supplements. Especially when detoxing. Fresh turmeric root is awesome.


     


    The greater the sources and more natural, the better. It enhances the effect.


    Trying to eat the equivalent in terms of grams or mg in herbs (fresh) would need the appetite of a horse. You might like looking here for combined pill variants of herbs: http://www.ariseandshine.com/whole-body-detox/herbal-nutrition-all-organic-or-wild-crafted-300-capsules.html#prettyPhoto


    The point here is that these herbs are often overlooked as flavorsome items used in cooking.


    That need not be the case at all.


  • NickatNickat
    edited June 2014

    Just 10g of fresh Basil leaves contain 528mg of vitamin A. Buy organic or grow your own.It`s an alternative to cod liver oil pills. Just remember adding too much vitamin A in your diet can result in liver damage.If your catching colds often you might want to try and add more vitamin A.Try combining 1/4 cup crushed basil leaves, a tablespoon of lemon juice, a half cup of grass fed salted butter and roll into balls. (You can add garlic if you like). Leave in fridge for 30 mins to set.


    Tastes great if left to melt on a steaks.


  • @megs1768


     


    It will not take very much cilantro for the dextox effect.  A teaspoon of cilantro contains enough phenolic compounds to safely remove quite a bit of toxic material from the body for elimination.


  • NickatNickat
    edited June 2014
    Different parts of  herbs may contain higher levels of nutrients and properties. An example would be that the leaf of cilantro plant has more than the stem when we are talking about phenolic content. There is no reason why both can`t be used though.

    If your looking for higher amounts of phenolic and antioxidants per fresh herb at equal weighted amounts you might want to look at Mint and Parsley. Again leaf part higher than the stem in these free radical fighting properties.

     


  • CycloneCyclone rich in satisfats
    Cilantro is also supposed to have some kind of anti-anxiety effects also.
  • I've heard (not verified) that herbs actually have a higher nutrient content than other leafy greens. Their strong flavor supposedly indicates nutrient value that has been bred out of things like spinach. Interesting thought


  • NickatNickat
    edited June 2014

    @brainstorm11


    You know that wouldn't surprise us at all. Grown fresh for a supermarket and growing fresh from a wild source are two entirely different concepts.


     


    Think about the hybrid techniques and growing technology used to mass produce store bought so called fresh herbs and spices. Now compare that to the wild varieties that exist on the planet. Pretty sure if we examine this further with data we could find reasons and examples why this is the case? The nuclius of a seed pod is very likely to contain more than the leaf but might not always be the case.

    It's the placenta of life for the plant to grow. Could be worth researching the properties of stem, leaf, seed and fruit not to mention dried or fresh. Flavor and smell need not be as important as we are lead to believe.


    Don't even get us started on the storage of herbs and spices. The mycotoxins caused by bad storage etc...has been covered in another thread. Dave "The Canary" has plenty to say about that there.


    There`s a great article about the assessment of microbiological safety of dried spices and herbs here too:


    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11130-010-0186-0#page-1


     


    Lastly, further natural causes of why some plants produce toxins biologically to repel or counter diseases etc...


    These do change the nutrients of the plants themselves and should be looked at too.


  • NickatNickat
    edited June 2014

    Okay so after getting my results back (Nick) saw that the total White Blood Cell count still low. Was`nt surprized as it is genetically low just like my father's. The Neutrophil count was 1.20 10*9/L just below the lower end of the "in range" amount. Decided to test out the Astragalus plant root to see if this improves the count in the future.


     


    http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/astragalus


     


    It`s a Chinese herb known as huang qi, meaning "yellow leader", because the root is yellow (a little like tumeric).


    Was hoping the amounts of Vitamin supplements A, C and Zinc might have influenced the balance and the clean BP Diet too but the levels hardly moved up much. Maybe this plant root will improve immune function too.


    Anyone used it?


     


    Side Effects and Safety Concerns


     


    People with autoimmune diseases, such as Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes or systemic lupus erythematosus shouldn't use astragalus unless recommended by a qualified healthcare practitioner. People who have had transplant surgery should not use astragalus.


    The safety of astragalus in pregnant or nursing women or children isn't known.


     


    Possible Interactions


     


    Astragalus may interfere with the effectiveness of corticosteroid medications, such as:


    • Nasacort (triamcinolone)
    • Beconase, Vancenase (beclomethasone)
    • Decadron (dexamethasone)
    • Deltasone (prednisone)
    • hydrocortisone
    • Medrol (methylprednisolone)
    • prednisolone

     


    Astragalus may decrease the effectiveness of drugs that suppress the immune system, such as Imuran (azathioprine), CellCept, cyclosporine, Prograf, Rapamune and Zenapak.


    Theoretically, astragalus can increase the effectiveness of antiviral medications such as acyclovir and amantadine.


  • Interesting.  Astragalus herbs have also been shown to increase telemeter length.  In fact, the ultra expensive supplement, TA-65 is a propriatary blend of astragalus.


     


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20822369


  • John BrissonJohn Brisson The Legend Formerly Known as Ron Swanson ✭✭✭
    edited June 2014


    Okay so after getting my results back (Nick) saw that the total White Blood Cell count still low. Was`nt surprized as it is genetically low just like my father's. The Neutrophil count was 1.20 10*9/L just below the lower end of the "in range" amount. Decided to test out the Astragalus plant root to see if this improves the count in the future.


     


    http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/astragalus


     


    It`s a Chinese herb known as huang qi, meaning "yellow leader", because the root is yellow (a little like tumeric).


    Was hoping the amounts of Vitamin supplements A, C and Zinc might have influenced the balance and the clean BP Diet too but the levels hardly moved up much. Maybe this plant root will improve immune function too.


    Anyone used it?


     


    Side Effects and Safety Concerns


     


    People with autoimmune diseases, such as Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes or systemic lupus erythematosus shouldn't use astragalus unless recommended by a qualified healthcare practitioner. People who have had transplant surgery should not use astragalus.


    The safety of astragalus in pregnant or nursing women or children isn't known.


     


    Possible Interactions


     


    Astragalus may interfere with the effectiveness of corticosteroid medications, such as:


    • Nasacort (triamcinolone)
    • Beconase, Vancenase (beclomethasone)
    • Decadron (dexamethasone)
    • Deltasone (prednisone)
    • hydrocortisone
    • Medrol (methylprednisolone)
    • prednisolone

     


    Astragalus may decrease the effectiveness of drugs that suppress the immune system, such as Imuran (azathioprine), CellCept, cyclosporine, Prograf, Rapamune and Zenapak.


    Theoretically, astragalus can increase the effectiveness of antiviral medications such as acyclovir and amantadine.




     


    Astragalus helps with liver function.


    My book Fix Your Gut, is offered on Amazon for $9.99.

     

    I also offer coaching:  http://fixyourgut.com/health-coaching-information/

     

    Please join or like the Fix your Gut Facebook. Also please add me on twitter @FixYourGutJB.

     

    http://www.fixyourgut.com

     

  • NickatNickat
    edited July 2014


    Interesting.  Astragalus herbs have also been shown to increase telemeter length.  In fact, the ultra expensive supplement, TA-65 is a propriatary blend of astragalus.


     


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20822369




     


    There is a thread started by Mikeymilios (http://forum.bulletproofexec.com/index.php?/topic/9249-nitric-oxide-lobsters-telomeres-and-aging/) of which we contributed. The TA-65 you mention had escaped us in the fact that it does have astragulus (or at least the extracted pure sourced Cycloastragenol from their roots).


    Now of course this extracted isolated molecule will have telomerase activation activity far greater than the ground root itself but will this help replenish white blood cells in any way?


  • Star ChaserStar Chaser Powered by Shred


    I've heard (not verified) that herbs actually have a higher nutrient content than other leafy greens. Their strong flavor supposedly indicates nutrient value that has been bred out of things like spinach. Interesting thought















    Herbs and spices are #2 in matt lalonde's nutrient density rankings, just under organ meats and oils. The only problem is, like many have mentioned, we don't eat them in large quantities.


    But on the topic of powerhouse spices.. Cinnamon and Vanilla!

    I am a Video Game composer under the pseudonym Star Chaser.

    twitch.tv/starchaservgm (streaming most saturday and sunday nights EST)

    Guitarist:

    https://youtu.be/8L0SkovqEf4

    Next cover is Die by the Sword by Dragonforce.

    Music/Health/Biohacking Blog and Podcast currently under construction.

    Thanks to the internet, health experts, and my unending curiosity, I have overcome: excessive sweating (adrenal fatigue), anxiety and panic attacks, extremely high estrogen levels (man boobs), chronic brain fog (yeast overgrowth), depression, and am currently battling SIBO (took it from being so bloated it felt like my stomach skin was going to rip, slept 2 hours per night for a week because of upset stomach and being chronically fatigued to very mild, manageable but still annoying symptoms) and currently battling sleep deprivation/insomnia probably due to the SIBO/Leaky Gut and resulting histamine intolerance.

  • NickatNickat
    edited July 2014


    Astragalus helps with liver function.




     


    People with Cushing's syndrome might well need support via liver function particularly if they are obese and have type 2 diabetes. Fortunately this is not the case.


    However....


    Helping the liver function better might improve the processing of bacteria and toxins being  released under times of stress (low monocyte levels). As a theory is it possible that previous deseases in either parents (genetically passed down to a sibling) or through childhood deseases (stored somehow in the body) might be released and account for low count rates found in a body found today. This might be far off the mark but maybe you could clarify if that is at ALL possible or not. Was thinking about measels, flu, malaria and typhoid, as examples, stored and then released later. Just a thought.

  • NickatNickat
    edited July 2014


    Herbs and spices are #2 in matt lalonde's nutrient density rankings, just under organ meats and oils. The only problem is, like many have mentioned, we don't eat them in large quantities.


    But on the topic of powerhouse spices.. Cinnamon and Vanilla!




     


     


     


     


    Powerhouse spices.....totally agree. Siagon Cinnamon in daily BP coffee is awesome. Would love to try the BP Vanilla too but not sourced a decent price here in the UK yet. What benefits have you noticed from their addition?


     


    p.s. Dustings of cacao rich dense nutrients on BP coffee darn good too....but then you know that :wink:


     


     


    Have just tried Upgraded Vanilla and It`s totally awesome and nothing like expected.


  • Star ChaserStar Chaser Powered by Shred


    Powerhouse spices.....totally agree. Siagon Cinnamon in daily BP coffee is awesome. Would love to try the BP Vanilla too but not sourced a decent price here in the UK yet. What benefits have you noticed from their addition?


     


    p.s. Dustings of cacao rich dense nutrients on BP coffee darn good too....but then you know that :wink:















    I use a raw vanilla bean powder. I'm not sure if raw is optimal or not as I'm pretty sure Dave's isn't raw but I don't think there would be a significant difference. The vanilla and cinnamon both having amazing taste benefit if you add 1/8 tsp right into your coffee grounds (if using a drip system). As far as health benefits I've noticed better blood sugar regulation as I used to have a little crash around 11am and no longer have those since adding 3/4 tsp saigon to my breakfast.

    I am a Video Game composer under the pseudonym Star Chaser.

    twitch.tv/starchaservgm (streaming most saturday and sunday nights EST)

    Guitarist:

    https://youtu.be/8L0SkovqEf4

    Next cover is Die by the Sword by Dragonforce.

    Music/Health/Biohacking Blog and Podcast currently under construction.

    Thanks to the internet, health experts, and my unending curiosity, I have overcome: excessive sweating (adrenal fatigue), anxiety and panic attacks, extremely high estrogen levels (man boobs), chronic brain fog (yeast overgrowth), depression, and am currently battling SIBO (took it from being so bloated it felt like my stomach skin was going to rip, slept 2 hours per night for a week because of upset stomach and being chronically fatigued to very mild, manageable but still annoying symptoms) and currently battling sleep deprivation/insomnia probably due to the SIBO/Leaky Gut and resulting histamine intolerance.

  • I eat TONS of Turmeric.


    It is a strong antioxidant. Anti-Infamity. Anti-Cancer. It is a cooling herb, compared to heat in Ginger. How can you argue with all that COLOR?! (Buy organic bulk from a reputable herb supplier. Frontier, Monterey Spice Co., or Rose Mountain)


    I typically I eat about a tablespoon of it with a meal of cooked cabbage (cooked in butter / bacon grease). That's a lot of goodness! 


    Cabbage, the the way. Safe conventional (peel off out layer). High in sulfur (for detox) as well as Vitamin C.. Cruciferous so good for lowering estrogen. Great go to veg. Cheap & Works!


  • @Nickat: It is dependent on why your white blood cell count is low to begin with.  It may be valuable to do an white blood cell differential to find the percentages of each of the five white blood cell types.  This will give us a better clue as to what is going on.  Has there been any fever?


  • NickatNickat
    edited July 2014

    @Swapper Jack`s

     


    Yeah but the Full blood "in range" counts seem to vary so much between testers it`s hard to know what optimized is.

    Take Neutrophil count for instance....the minimum in range can be 2.0010*9/L and have seen the Lymphocyte count as low as 1.30 0*9/L or up to 1.60 0*9/L. Splitting hairs? but markers should be the same right no matter where they are tested and yes that is naive thinking. So from what can be based on general feeling and history of wellness these values might give clues particularly if there is a genetic pattern passed down from father/mother or both (all verified by FBC values) and compared.


    Understanding ''Each type plays its own role in fighting viral, fungal, bacterial and parasitic infections. A low count of white blood cells in the body, called leukopenia, reduces immunity and leaves the body vulnerable to diseases'' etc... no fever here today but would love to raise the security blanket a touch (so to speak) if possible and looking for hacks to do it in a natural way.... 'erbs.


  • NickatNickat
    edited July 2014

    Rehmannia is a root herb for disorders of the kidneys and adrenal glands and autoimmune diseases that may also help the thyroids too.  It might not agree with everyone and if you suffer side effects then stop using it. Not recommended if pregnant.


     


    Think that this might make a good herbal adaptogens combo if added to astragalus.


    If anyone has used it please post you findings.


     


    There is mention of adaptogen herbs here:


     


    http://forum.bulletproofexec.com/index.php?/topic/11438-adaptogen-herbs/?hl=herbs


     


    http://forum.bulletproofexec.com/index.php?/topic/8297-using-adaptogens-for-cognitive-stress/?hl=herbs#entry75111


     


    Will conduct an N=1 on Rehmannia and astragulus.


  • NickatNickat
    edited July 2014


    I eat TONS of Turmeric.


    It is a strong antioxidant. Anti-Infamity. Anti-Cancer. It is a cooling herb, compared to heat in Ginger. How can you argue with all that COLOR?! (Buy organic bulk from a reputable herb supplier. Frontier, Monterey Spice Co., or Rose Mountain)


    I typically I eat about a tablespoon of it with a meal of cooked cabbage (cooked in butter / bacon grease). That's a lot of goodness! 


    Cabbage, the the way. Safe conventional (peel off out layer). High in sulfur (for detox) as well as Vitamin C.. Cruciferous so good for lowering estrogen. Great go to veg. Cheap & Works!




     


     


     


    The anti-amyloid and anti-inflammatory properties of tumeric are thought to be effective in preventing or at-least delaying the onset of Alzheimer`s disease. Just be careful about buying too much of it at once and storing it for a long time. It`ll get old , moldy and be ineffective before you know it.


     


    http://forum.bulletproofexec.com/index.php?/topic/2285-saltsspicesherbs-and-agebacteriamycotoxins/page-2?hl=herbs#entry86543


     


    http://forum.bulletproofexec.com/index.php?/topic/6512-anti-inflammation-supplements/page-3


  • NickatNickat
    edited July 2014


    Cilantro is also supposed to have some kind of anti-anxiety effects also.




     


     


    Talking about anti-anxiety and herbs...there is a thread that has mentioned memory, cognition, anxiety, depression and  antioxidants through using herbs in a tea. It sparks some interest for ourselves and might do for you too:


     


    http://forum.bulletproofexec.com/index.php?/topic/9220-ashwagandha-bacopa-and-gotu-kola/?hl=herbs


  • NickatNickat
    edited July 2014

    When trying to source my herbal Rehmannia and Astragalus found a strange red powdered concoction of various herbs that could be added to water. It`s called TianChi. Used to enhance and improve brain, hormone and sleep.


    Curiosity got the better of us and decided to look it up on the forum and found that there was a thread on it:


    http://forum.bulletproofexec.com/index.php?/topic/6246-tianchi/?hl=tianchi


    and also mentioned here:


    http://forum.bulletproofexec.com/index.php?/topic/3328-more-supplementsgear-i-havent-seen-on-here-yet/?hl=tianchi


     


    It was asked in the later thread that they would like to ''see someone do a breakdown of Tianchi ingredient by ingredient to see if its worth the outrageous price''. A breakdown of ingredient to see if they worked and what noticeable differences they made by taking it. Then reflect on the price.


     


    So here we have the breakdown of the ingredients:


    http://pacificfit.net/images/TianChiLabel.jpg


     


    Schizandra or Schisandra (magnolia vine)


    Reishi Mushroom


    Ashwagandha (Sensoril®)                                        http://nutragenesis.com/Dietary-Supplements/sensoril.html


    Rhodiola


    Ecklonia Cava (Ford-Speranza Nutraceuticals Inc)   http://www.eckloniacava.com/about.html


    Eleuthero


    Epimedium


    Cistanches


    Gotu Kola


    Albizalbizziazia Flower


    Astragalus


    Green Tea


    Polygonum


    Lycium (Goji)


    Anemarrhena


    Licorice


    Polygala


    Clubmoss


    Cocoa Bean Extract,


    Stevia Leaf


    Acerola Cherry


    Raspberry


     


    So to save time and costs could anyone that has taken any of the above please quantify the results they have noticed by the addition of any of the above? That would be a start. Thoughts anyone?


     


    Although Rehmannia is not mentioned above (Nic) will be taking it with Astragulus.


    Astragulas first and then the addition of Rehmannia. Will update about that later.


     


     


     


    'Astragalus was seen to have a stimulatory effect on the relative numbers of leucocytes at the p s 0.01 level of significance. The relative proportions of individual categories of leucocytes were also significantly affected by treatment with Astragalus (p s 0.05), such that high proportions were lowered and low proportions were raised. This effect applied to both the variance between sample means and the variance within samples. Specifically, four subjects had above normal baseline proportions of monocytes &/or eosinophils, while three subjects had below normal proportions. In each case, treatment with Astragalus brought the proportions within normal ranges. Thus Astragalus appears to have a regulatory or amphoteric effect on individual classes of leucocytes in the WBC differential count. Furthermore, these effects seem to be sustained over time as the results obtained one week after discontinuing treatment indicate. This finding corroborates observations made by Hou et al''.


    http://www.beyondweird.com/Wicca/astragal.html


     


     


     


    Almost forgot to add the nutrients list too:


     


    Tyrosine


    D-Ribose


    DMAE


    Cognizin Citioline


    Taurine Cognizin (cdp-choline)


    Glycine


    Naicin


    Vitamin C


    B6 (Pyrodoxine)


    Pyrodioxine

    B5 (Pantothenic acid)


    DMG dimethylglycine


    Citicoline

  • The synergy of that stack is not very optimal.  Rhodiola does not stack well with licorice, the algae will chelate the ashwagandha, and too many trendy berries.  I bet it makes a great tasting tea, but I bet we could design something more effective for the money.


  • NickatNickat
    edited July 2014
    Collaboration time (all welcome)


    Working with each other to make a synergy of an optimal stack that is effective and cheaper will be our task then.


    Swapper Jack`s can you explain why Rhodiola will not stack well with licorice? and how the algae will chelate the ashwagandha? We thought that Rhodiola extract would enhance the transportation of tryptophan and 5HTP into the brain and work well with licorice, Schizandra or Schisandra (magnolia vine) and Astragalus. In particular for fatigue, endurance and strength. Licorice seems to have the active ingredients of glycyrrhizinic acid and deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL). As far as we know the glycrrhizinate is the one to keep away from because of side effects etc....are you saying that the Ecklonia Cava will lose it`s effectiveness and decrease the immune system when interacting with the ashwagandha?
  • I typically take herbs in isolation and away from food, since it is out of my pay grade to know how they interact and herbs are just unpredictable.


    Having said that, I like ashwahganda and rhodiola a lot.
  • Jason HooperJason Hooper ✭✭✭
    edited July 2014
    Licorice usually contains about three percent glycyrrhizic acid by volume which affects salt regulation in the kidneys.  According to this study:

     


     

    licorice inhibits cortisol production due to the salt/kidney interaction.  Rhodiola stimulates cortisol expression through ANOVA as observed in this study:

     


     

    The two of these together makes for a physiological mess in the endocrine system.

     

    Ashwahganda has some beautiful compounds called sitoindosides.  There are phenyl subgroups that are bound to hydroxyl groups that radiate from them like a flower.  The ecklonia cava is a species of brown algae whose cell wall contains amplifies that will bind to the sitoindosides.  They will both be rendered useless and excreted.

     

    To create a nice stack, we need to establish an endpoint and work backwards.  That way, we can choose herbs that complement one another in their digestion, metabolism, and biological impact.  Are you still looking to boost white cell count?

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