Nutritional Benefits Of Herbs In The Bp Diet.

13

Comments

  • NickatNickat
    edited September 2014

    Thought we’d draw attention that sometimes herbs combined with certain drug combos can have drastic effect.


    Little has been mentioned here on the forum. Something to keep in mind.


     


    http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/2012/05/beware-of-risky-herb-drug-combos/index.htm


     


    newdrugchart0701.gif


  • That interaction chart is quite an indicator of how powerful herbs are.


  • NickatNickat
    edited September 2014


    Coriander / cilantro is meant to help removing mercury from the brain. You can get drops of oil to use as part of a mercury detox.




     


    Coriander / cilantro (Chinese Parsley) is so good at removing heavy metals. Dr Dietrich Klinghardt claims that it can cross the blood-brain barrier. By getting into the central nervous system it does its work within the brain. Because it is so efficient at doing it's detox it can cause  re-toxification. That's to say it leaves some of the heavy metals in connective tissues. His solution is to always take with at least one chelator. Use chlorella or zeolites as both are considered Bulletproof.


     


    Build your dosage up from a few drops twice a day to three times a day and more drops until you dump excessive bile (your gallblader works overtime). Take the chelator of choice at last 30mins before the drops.


     


    Please note the above info was from Dr Dietrich Klinghardt claims and not personal N=1.


     


    Stevo if you have decided to take these steps as a detox please share.


  • StevoStevo Upgrade in Progress

    I don't know when my amalgams were all removed many years back but they are certainly gone now. I did buy some cilantro oil from iHerb just for the hell of it since it was a cheap thing to add to an existing order. I've been doing up to 15 drops in water in the morning - the water I use to swallow my morning supps, which includes a few chlorella tablets.


     


    On some days I've noticed an extremely clear feeling in my head but I couldn't say it was the cilantro for sure. I think if you take it with a chelator, I don't see there's any harm in making it a permanent part of your morning.


  • Interesting info here, I'll have to try it out. Haven't experimented much with herbs. Would like to grow my own though.


  • Feel like this topic should be pinned so it is always on the front page.. Highly suggest attempting to grow your own herbs to the person above this, as well as anyone else.


     




    Interesting info here, I'll have to try it out. Haven't experimented much with herbs. Would like to grow my own though.



  • NickatNickat
    edited October 2014

    Like the idea of grow your own. Have looked at ''herb wall's'' and ''vertical gardens'' for inspiration: http://www.inspirationgreen.com/herb-walls.html


    Space is a little restricted for us. For a easy fix try an eco ''pallet garden'': http://www.ecohome.net/news/latest/recycled-creative-functional-pallet-garden-huge-success-canada-blooms-2012


    We have even read articles where some people have hooked up a live fish sumps and continually recycle the by products (nitrites, nitrate's and ammonia} from the fish water as soil fertilisers.


    If anyone has thoughts/experience please post.


  • Thanks for posting that.. Going to look into doing the herb wall inside. Seems perfect.


  • Star ChaserStar Chaser Powered by Shred


    That interaction chart is quite an indicator of how powerful herbs are.















    And why you might not want to take the "Shotgun" approach when it comes to supplementing.

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  • NickatNickat
    edited October 2014

    Capsicum and Green tea update:


    Turns out that as a plant extract capsicum powder combined with green tea extract can reduce oxidised stress in malignant cells. The study claims that this reduction of oxidised stress works equally well for those that have cancer or those without. The nrf2 measurement levels indicated this. The study was said to note that although 15% reduction of this oxidised stress could be reduced by

    Green tea extract alone, it was only when combined with the Capsicum powder, that it could further reduce oxidised stress levels up to 50%.


    The Capsicum used was non pungent (not hot chilies) and luckily for us helps keep our cells healthy by protecting them. Not bad for a natural herbal formula for longevity.


    re:http://www.researchgate.net/publication/258632775_Oxidative_stress_reduced_by_a_green_tea_concentrate_and_capsicum_combination_synergistic_effects


    Looking further into TeaFense (the product referred) you will note that their product is ten times greater than Green tea extract and one hundred times stronger than EGCG.


    re:http://www.newproductsplus.net/teafense.html


    Maybe we should take account and see if either the 'Green tea extract' or 'Capsicum' will further ''enhance'' other supplementations we take. e.g. Upgradedâ„¢ Glutathione Force ?


    Although take note http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121217102653.htm


    The Capsicum thought to be used is Long pepper (Piper longum) http://www.nutricargo.com/pepper-long-41-powdered-extract?language=en&currency=GBP but the molecule isolate called 'piperlongumine' selectively blocks the Nrf2 program in cancer cells, sparing normal cells from toxicity.


    (It's not black or white pepper btw but a similar plant type).


    re:https://www.caymanchem.com/app/template/Article.vm/article/2168


    What is interesting is that the Green tea extract in the TeaFense study ruled Green tea extract higher than EGCG. Wonder what concentration (%) purity EGCG it was though?

    Also in light of the new evidence in the links posted regarding how we measure oxidised stress: Should we change or modify our BP supplementations or Intermittent Fasting to accommodate it?


     


    Bulletproof-Dove-Logo-300x284.png


    Thoughts anyone? or have you herb it all before?


  • CycloneCyclone rich in satisfats


    Thought we’d draw attention that sometimes herbs combined with certain drug combos can have drastic effect.


    Little has been mentioned here on the forum. Something to keep in mind.


     


    http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/2012/05/beware-of-risky-herb-drug-combos/index.htm


     


    newdrugchart0701.gif






     


    I was looking for a 3 on anything that looked like a good effect to magnify, but nope...

  • ACH85ACH85 ✭✭
    edited October 2014


    Turns out that as a plant extract capsicum powder combined with green tea extract can reduce oxidised stress in malignant cells. The study claims that this reduction of oxidised stress works equally well for those that have cancer or those without. The nrf2 measurement levels indicated this. The study was said to note that although 15% reduction of this oxidised stress could be reduced by

    Green tea extract alone, it was only when combined with the Capsicum powder, that it could further reduce oxidised stress levels up to 50%.


    re:http://www.researchgate.net/publication/258632775_Oxidative_stress_reduced_by_a_green_tea_concentrate_and_capsicum_combination_synergistic_effects




     


    I've got to say this research makes my spidey-sense tingle. 


     


    Since we can't access the full text, we can't assess their methods. How many participants were in the study? Was the "green tea extract alone" the same green tea extract tested alongside capsicum extract?


     


    So instead, I dug into the authors. The two Morrés (D. James and Dorothy) are the co-founders of the company listed as the research sponsor in the article, Mor-NuCo. That company, in turn, owns the trademark for the green tea / capsicum product listed, Capsol-T. The other product, TeaFense may simply be another trademarked name for the same ingredients. They make very similar claims on their websites. TeaFense is trademarked by a Delaware LLC based in Missouri, which sells to the animal husbandry industry. (I can't link to US gov't trademark search results, but you can search Capsol-T and TeaFense at this link which I think will work: http://tmsearch.uspto.gov/


     


    The authors have some other articles. 


     


    In one 2014 study, they found healthy adults with no symptoms of cancer, used their proprietary "ONCOblot" system (also owned by Mor-NuCo) to show that some of them did have cancer, fed them some Capsol-T for 3-6 months, then used the same proprietary ONCOblot" system to show that they no longer had cancer. Note that they dosed the participants every 4 hours, and on Capsol-T's website they say that if you don't dose every 4 hours, the cancer can come back. That's why they sell a more expensive version with a time release that "allows the patient to sleep for up to 8 hours." 


     


    In a 2006 study, the authors found that a grape extract "provided by the California Table Grape Commission" mixed with green tea was "nearly as effective as the standard" green tea with capsicum. 


     




    Looking further into TeaFense (the product referred) you will note that their product is ten times greater than Green tea extract and one hundred times stronger than EGCG.


    re:http://www.newproductsplus.net/teafense.html


    Maybe we should take account and see if either the 'Green tea extract' or 'Capsicum' will further ''enhance'' other supplementations we take. e.g. Upgradedâ„¢ Glutathione Force ?




     


    Those numbers (one hundred times stronger) and the question of enhancing other supplements really require us to understand the mechanism of action with capsicum. The best we get from the authors is back in 2003, before they founded Mor-NuCo. In the 2003 study, we see that:


     



    These studies were guided by assays of the putative catechin-vanilloid target protein tNOX, a cell surface growth-related enzymatic activity specific to cancer. The activity of the protein target was inhibited by the tea catechins and the Capsicum vanilloids. As with growth, the tea and Capsicum preparations evaluated were synergistic in their inhibition of the target enzymatic activity.



     


    So, perhaps we are fine with just Upgraded Vanilla? But really I'd want more in-depth research – as full text – to have an informed opinion. 


     




    The Capsicum thought to be used is Long pepper (Piper longum) http://www.nutricargo.com/pepper-long-41-powdered-extract?language=en&currency=GBP




     


    That link says it comes from a flowering vine in the Piperaceae family, but from what I can tell Capsicum is a plant in the family Solanaceae (aka nightshade.) 


     


     


    Ok, so what do I really think? I think the Morrés were academics who got lucky or followed some other research and found that the vanilloids in capsicum extract seem to interact synergistically with the catechins in green tea extract on certain measures, and ended up forming a few companies to sell this and other stuff. Nothing wrong with that. But nothing wrong with us being aware of their motivations. And, I would argue, selling a more expensive product so your patients can sleep through the night is shady. I don't buy that the vanilloids in capsicum are better than other vanilloids, and I don't buy that there aren't other extracts just as powerful... like grape extract, paid for by the California Table Grape Commission. Need full-text and a clear mechanism of action for this to be actionable research. 


     


    As for the two antioxidant links... I need to learn more. 


  • NickatNickat
    edited October 2014
    Vanilloids are just awesome. The herbal upgraded vanilla really packs a few punches in all the right places. It's so easy to leave it there but as you rightly say there are plenty of alternative sources that deserve explanation and uses. How they interact with our body and with other supplementations is also a deserving topic. Thanks for your insight.
  • NickatNickat
    edited November 2014

    There has been some talk about Black Pepper on the forum and it`s benefits in one form or another.

    The way in which it fights inflammation, helps with absorption of other supplements by up to 2000% etc....


    You may wish to brush up on BioPerine (http://www.raysahelian.com/bioperine.html)


    Watch:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=5N3iLhjLF5s#t=7


    See how TNF expression plays an important role and how bioperine combined with cloves, ginger, rosemary and turmeric maybe worthwhile for you.
    http://youtu.be/iXnMi6RE0B4


    Dave says that Black Pepper is not Bulletproof but maybe the piperine extract is. We`d like to think so.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    With regards to bulletproofnovice excellent post below:


     


    'Most of the studies on this herb are using turmeric extracts that contain mostly curcumin itself, with dosages usually exceeding 1 gram per day. It would be very difficult to reach these levels just using the turmeric spice in your foods'. 


     


    Maybe go for:


    500mg curcumin extract


    10mg Bioperine pill (95% no need to go higher)


     


    Taken twice daily and a small dose of cold raw milk kefir mixed with raw honey. GI tract goodness.


     


    What's your take on isolated curcumin? Better or should we still use whole turmeric?


  • edited November 2014

    Turmeric has many active components, with curcumin being the most active.  I take the Thorne Meriva phytosome version and also cook with turmeric. Dr. Weil recommends taking turmeric and curcumin with black pepper for better absorption.  I briefly looked at supplements and some of the non phytosome versions  generally include black pepper or piperine.


     


    Once in a while I drink turmeric milk, but always mean to do it  more. It is an Ayurvedic remedy.  You could use milk of your choice.


     


    http://www.giirvaani.net/warm-turmeric-milk-health-benefits.html


     


    Health Benefits of Turmeric Milk


    1. As turmeric has anti-microbial it can effectively treat various respiratory problems like asthma, bronchitis, lung congestion and sinus. This healthy drink ican easily treat bacterial infections and viral infections.
    2.  
    3. Turmeric milk is good for the stomach and helps in the digestion process. It can be used to treat diarrhea and indigestion but for this you need to use low fat milk. High fat milk can aggravate the symptoms of diarrhea. 
    4.  
    5. Turmeric milk can also give you healthy and glowing slin. This heathy drink works as soothing mask or lotion to reduce redness of the skin or patches, which are very common skin problems.
    6.  
    7. The antiviral and antibacterial properties of turmeric make hot turmeric milk one of the best home remedies to treat cold and cough. This simple drink can be used to soothe an aching throat or feverishness. A sip of this hot turmeric milk will treat the symptoms of common cold and cough within a day or two.
    8.  
    9. It is a known fact that milk being rich in calcium is good to get strong and healthy bones. Plus, turmeric also has bone-strengthening properties that can help to strengthening bones.
    10.  
    11. Due to turmeric’s high antioxidant content, the combination of milk and turmeric is commonly recommended to fight free radicals that cause damage to skin cells and make your skin lose elasticity.
    12.  
    13. Turmeric milk benefits the health as it stops the growth of breast, skin, lung, prostate, and colon cancer due to its anti-inflammatory properties.
    14.  
    15. Turmeric milk has amino acid, tryptophan which helps you get a peaceful and deep sleep. Those who have sleep problems must drink a glass of hot turmeric milk daily half an hour before going to bed.
    16.  
    17. The anti-inflammatory property of turmeric is very useful to treating arthritis pain. Turmeric milk provides relief from arthritis pain and also improves flexibility of the joints and muscles.
    18.  
    19. Blood impurities can lead to sever health problems and turmeric milk is a great remedy to purify blood naturally. It revitalizes and boosts blood circulation in the body. This healthy drink also thins the blood which cleanses the lymphatic system and blood vessels from impurities.

     


    Recipe of Hot Turmeric Milk


    Hot turmeric milk can be easily prepared at home.


     


    1. Heat one glass of milk on the stove.
    2. When the milk starts boiling, add one teaspoon of turmeric powder.
    3. Stir slowly to dissolve any lumps. The milk will take on a rich, mustard color.
    4. Remove from heat and then add one tablespoon of honey to enhance its flavor.
    5. Allow the solution to cool for a few minutes.
    6. Drink it while it is still warm.

     


    Note: Hot turmeric milk is generally considered to be safe; however it can cause nausea and stomach upset in some individuals.


     


    TURMERIC JUICE: (BALINESE JAMU KUNYIT)


     


    Here's what you'll need to get started: 


    • 5-7 inches turmeric 
    • 5-7 tamarind
    • 2 lemons
    • raw honey
    • water
    • blender
    • strainer
    • bowl
    • mason jar(s) or other glass jar with lid

    1. Peel turmeric. Your fingers will turn yellow. Don’t worry! All-natural dish soap gets it right out. If your cutting board or countertop get stained, slather on dish soap and rub it in. Let it soak in for 5 min or longer, then scrub with water and sponge. The turmeric stain will vanish!

     

    2. Crack and open tamarind. Make sure you get all the inner roots off, too. We’re only going to use the inner fruit.

     

    3. Fill a big pot with water, put peeled tumeric in and let it boil for at least 20 minutes until the water becomes a rich and vibrant marigold color.

     

    4. While the tumeric water is boiling, get a pan and pour 1 inch of water in with the peeled tamarind. Move the fruit around with a wooden utensil, mix it in with the water so it can melt and dissolve into a jam like texture. More water shouldn’t be needed, but if it’s lookin’ a bit dry, pour water in as needed.

     

    By this time, you should be able to see the little seeds coming out. When the texture looks soft, turn heat off and let it cool down.

     

    5. Go back to the tumeric water. By now, the color should look ready. Pour a little bit of cold water to lower the temperature. Take the turmeric water and pour it into the blender with the tumeric. We boiled it so the root could soften and have more flavor, now it’s ready to buzz in the blender for even more flavor and richness! Blend, blend, blend. The color now should look like an extra extra fiery marigold.

     

    6. Go back to the tamarind in the pan. Pour substance into the strainer that is placed on top of a small bowl to catch the tamarind. Swish the jam like substance around in the strainer with the wooden utensil-- we only want to use the soft bits of the fruit. No seeds, no seed peels.

     

    7. Pour the tamarind that has been caught in the bowl into the blender with the tumeric water. Buzz it around again.

     

    8. We’re almost done. Squeeze your lemons into the blender. Now take the blender and pour your yummy juice into your mason jar(s). Add honey to taste, close with lid, shake it up to mix.

     

    9. Store in fridge up to 3-4 days and drink daily! 

     


     

     


    FROM DR. WEIL:


     


    In addition to its use as a culinary spice, turmeric has been used traditionally in India as a disinfectant and treatment for laryngitis, bronchitis, and diabetes. Turmeric is derived from the rhizomes (underground stems) of the plant Curcuma longa, a member of the ginger family. It is responsible for the yellow color of Indian curry and American mustard. Curcumin, which has powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, is the most active constituent of turmeric.


     


     


     

    Population studies have shown that elderly villagers in India appear to have the lowest rate of Alzheimer's disease in the world, and researchers have speculated that the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin may be partly responsible. (Alzheimer's begins as an inflammatory process in the brain, and Indians eat turmeric with almost every meal). So far, however, I've seen no evidence of benefit from curcumin supplementation in Alzheimer's patients.


     


     


    Other studies of turmeric and curcumin have shown the following benefits:


    • Turmeric extract worked as well as a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug for treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee in a study published in the August 2009 issue of the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine.
    • Laboratory studies suggest that curcumin acts as a weak phytoestrogen and seems to have cancer protective effects.
    • Lab studies have also shown that curcumin induces programmed death of colon cancer cells, and clinical trials are investigating the use of curcumin in treatment of colon cancer.
    • Curcumin suppresses microinflammation in the GI tract associated with inflammatory bowel disease.

     


     


    I frequently recommend turmeric supplements, and I believe whole turmeric is more effective than isolated curcumin for inflammatory disorders, including arthritis, tendonitis, and autoimmune conditionsTake 400 to 600 milligrams of turmeric extracts (available in tablets or capsules) three times per day or as directed on the product label. Look for products standardized for 95% curcuminoids. Neither curcumin nor turmeric taken orally is well absorbed unless taken with black pepper or piperine, a constituent of black pepper responsible for its pungency. When shopping for supplements, make sure that the one you choose contains black pepper extract or piperine. (If you're cooking with turmeric, be sure to add some black pepper to the food.). Be patient when taking turmeric supplements: the full benefits may not be apparent for eight weeks.


     


     


    Don't use turmeric if you have gallstones or bile duct dysfunction. Pregnant women shouldn't use it without their doctors' approval. In rare cases, extended use can cause stomach upset or heartburn. (Note that piperine can slow the elimination of some prescription drugs including phenytoin [Dilantin], propranolol [Inderal], and theophylline. Some evidence also suggests that curcumin can interfere with a chemotherapy agent used to treat breast cancer, so if you're being treated for this disease, be sure to discuss the advisability of taking curcumin with your physician.


  • Star ChaserStar Chaser Powered by Shred

    Turmeric has many active components, with curcumin being the most active.  I take the Thorne Meriva phytosome version and also cook with turmeric. Dr. Weil recommends taking turmeric and curcumin with black pepper for better absorption.  I briefly looked at supplements and some of the non phytosome versions  generally include black pepper or piperine.

     

    Once in a while I drink turmeric milk, but always mean to do it  more. It is an Ayurvedic remedy.  You could use milk of your choice.

     
    http://www.giirvaani.net/warm-turmeric-milk-health-benefits.html

     
    Health Benefits of Turmeric Milk

    • As turmeric has anti-microbial it can effectively treat various respiratory problems like asthma, bronchitis, lung congestion and sinus. This healthy drink ican easily treat bacterial infections and viral infections.
    •  
    • Turmeric milk is good for the stomach and helps in the digestion process. It can be used to treat diarrhea and indigestion but for this you need to use low fat milk. High fat milk can aggravate the symptoms of diarrhea. 
    •  
    • Turmeric milk can also give you healthy and glowing slin. This heathy drink works as soothing mask or lotion to reduce redness of the skin or patches, which are very common skin problems.
    •  
    • The antiviral and antibacterial properties of turmeric make hot turmeric milk one of the best home remedies to treat cold and cough. This simple drink can be used to soothe an aching throat or feverishness. A sip of this hot turmeric milk will treat the symptoms of common cold and cough within a day or two.
    •  
    • It is a known fact that milk being rich in calcium is good to get strong and healthy bones. Plus, turmeric also has bone-strengthening properties that can help to strengthening bones.
    •  
    • Due to turmeric’s high antioxidant content, the combination of milk and turmeric is commonly recommended to fight free radicals that cause damage to skin cells and make your skin lose elasticity.
    •  
    • Turmeric milk benefits the health as it stops the growth of breast, skin, lung, prostate, and colon cancer due to its anti-inflammatory properties.
    •  
    • Turmeric milk has amino acid, tryptophan which helps you get a peaceful and deep sleep. Those who have sleep problems must drink a glass of hot turmeric milk daily half an hour before going to bed.
    •  
    • The anti-inflammatory property of turmeric is very useful to treating arthritis pain. Turmeric milk provides relief from arthritis pain and also improves flexibility of the joints and muscles.
    •  
    • Blood impurities can lead to sever health problems and turmeric milk is a great remedy to purify blood naturally. It revitalizes and boosts blood circulation in the body. This healthy drink also thins the blood which cleanses the lymphatic system and blood vessels from impurities.
     
    Recipe of Hot Turmeric Milk
    Hot turmeric milk can be easily prepared at home.

     
    • Heat one glass of milk on the stove.
    • When the milk starts boiling, add one teaspoon of turmeric powder.
    • Stir slowly to dissolve any lumps. The milk will take on a rich, mustard color.
    • Remove from heat and then add one tablespoon of honey to enhance its flavor.
    • Allow the solution to cool for a few minutes.
    • Drink it while it is still warm.
     
    Note: Hot turmeric milk is generally considered to be safe; however it can cause nausea and stomach upset in some individuals.

     
    TURMERIC JUICE: (BALINESE JAMU KUNYIT)
    http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-6780/A-Recipe-for-Turmeric-Juice-A-Powerful-Healing-Beverage.html

     


    Here's what you'll need to get started: 

    • 5-7 inches turmeric 
    • 5-7 tamarind
    • 2 lemons
    • raw honey
    • water
    • blender
    • strainer
    • bowl
    • mason jar(s) or other glass jar with lid

    1. Peel turmeric. Your fingers will turn yellow. Don’t worry! All-natural dish soap gets it right out. If your cutting board or countertop get stained, slather on dish soap and rub it in. Let it soak in for 5 min or longer, then scrub with water and sponge. The turmeric stain will vanish!

     

    2. Crack and open tamarind. Make sure you get all the inner roots off, too. We’re only going to use the inner fruit.

     

    3. Fill a big pot with water, put peeled tumeric in and let it boil for at least 20 minutes until the water becomes a rich and vibrant marigold color.

     

    4. While the tumeric water is boiling, get a pan and pour 1 inch of water in with the peeled tamarind. Move the fruit around with a wooden utensil, mix it in with the water so it can melt and dissolve into a jam like texture. More water shouldn’t be needed, but if it’s lookin’ a bit dry, pour water in as needed.

     

    By this time, you should be able to see the little seeds coming out. When the texture looks soft, turn heat off and let it cool down.

     

    5. Go back to the tumeric water. By now, the color should look ready. Pour a little bit of cold water to lower the temperature. Take the turmeric water and pour it into the blender with the tumeric. We boiled it so the root could soften and have more flavor, now it’s ready to buzz in the blender for even more flavor and richness! Blend, blend, blend. The color now should look like an extra extra fiery marigold.

     

    6. Go back to the tamarind in the pan. Pour substance into the strainer that is placed on top of a small bowl to catch the tamarind. Swish the jam like substance around in the strainer with the wooden utensil-- we only want to use the soft bits of the fruit. No seeds, no seed peels.

     

    7. Pour the tamarind that has been caught in the bowl into the blender with the tumeric water. Buzz it around again.

     

    8. We’re almost done. Squeeze your lemons into the blender. Now take the blender and pour your yummy juice into your mason jar(s). Add honey to taste, close with lid, shake it up to mix.

     

    9. Store in fridge up to 3-4 days and drink daily! 

     


     

     
    FROM DR. WEIL:

     

    In addition to its use as a culinary spice, turmeric has been used traditionally in India as a disinfectant and treatment for laryngitis, bronchitis, and diabetes. Turmeric is derived from the rhizomes (underground stems) of the plant Curcuma longa, a member of the ginger family. It is responsible for the yellow color of Indian curry and American mustard. Curcumin, which has powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, is the most active constituent of turmeric.

     

     

     

    Population studies have shown that elderly villagers in India appear to have the lowest rate of Alzheimer's disease in the world, and researchers have speculated that the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin may be partly responsible. (Alzheimer's begins as an inflammatory process in the brain, and Indians eat turmeric with almost every meal). So far, however, I've seen no evidence of benefit from curcumin supplementation in Alzheimer's patients.

     

     

    Other studies of turmeric and curcumin have shown the following benefits:
    • Turmeric extract worked as well as a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug for treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee in a study published in the August 2009 issue of the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine.
    • Laboratory studies suggest that curcumin acts as a weak phytoestrogen and seems to have cancer protective effects.
    • Lab studies have also shown that curcumin induces programmed death of colon cancer cells, and clinical trials are investigating the use of curcumin in treatment of colon cancer.
    • Curcumin suppresses microinflammation in the GI tract associated with inflammatory bowel disease.
     

     

    I frequently recommend turmeric supplements, and I believe whole turmeric is more effective than isolated curcumin for inflammatory disorders, including arthritis, tendonitis, and autoimmune conditionsTake 400 to 600 milligrams of turmeric extracts (available in tablets or capsules) three times per day or as directed on the product label. Look for products standardized for 95% curcuminoids. Neither curcumin nor turmeric taken orally is well absorbed unless taken with black pepper or piperine, a constituent of black pepper responsible for its pungency. When shopping for supplements, make sure that the one you choose contains black pepper extract or piperine. (If you're cooking with turmeric, be sure to add some black pepper to the food.). Be patient when taking turmeric supplements: the full benefits may not be apparent for eight weeks.

     

     

    Don't use turmeric if you have gallstones or bile duct dysfunction. Pregnant women shouldn't use it without their doctors' approval. In rare cases, extended use can cause stomach upset or heartburn. (Note that piperine can slow the elimination of some prescription drugs including phenytoin [Dilantin], propranolol [Inderal], and theophylline. Some evidence also suggests that curcumin can interfere with a chemotherapy agent used to treat breast cancer, so if you're being treated for this disease, be sure to discuss the advisability of taking curcumin with your physician.












    Great info on turmeric, thanks! I'd like to add that with regards to IBD specifically, the dose used in studies is 3,500mg and was shown to be just as effective as anti inflamatory IBD drugs.


    Second topic: ashwaghanda


    I've been using it with great success by itself at night but have recently tried stacking it with rhodiola instead. I really like the effects and use it on Saturdays as a caffeine off-day.


    Sensoril is supose to be taken on an empty stomach and the rhodiola with food. Do you guys take the ashwaghanda before breakfast and weight 20-30 min and then take the rhodiola or take the rhodiola with breakfast immediately and then take the ashwaghanda 1-2 hours after? Option 3 is going cowboy style and taking both rhodiola and ashwaghanda with breakfast which is what I have been doing.

    I am a Video Game composer under the pseudonym Star Chaser.

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    Thanks to the internet, health experts, and my unending curiosity, I have overcome: excessive sweating (adrenal fatigue), anxiety and panic attacks, extremely high estrogen levels (man boobs), chronic brain fog (yeast overgrowth), depression, and am currently battling SIBO (took it from being so bloated it felt like my stomach skin was going to rip, slept 2 hours per night for a week because of upset stomach and being chronically fatigued to very mild, manageable but still annoying symptoms) and currently battling sleep deprivation/insomnia probably due to the SIBO/Leaky Gut and resulting histamine intolerance.

  • NickatNickat
    edited December 2014

    Will probably start taking a 450mg capsule of CurcuminX4000 (http://www.burstingwithhealth.co.uk/acatalog/CurcuminX4000.html#aGHN_2fCURCUMIN) containing 200mg of highly effective Curcumin Phytosome, which delivers the equivalent benefits of 4000mg of an ordinary Curcumin 95% powdered capsules. Break open and served in said turmeric recipe above. As an added boost will add an all  natural blend of eight cetylated fatty acids found in bovine tallow oil in the form of Celadrin capsules (http://www.celadrinforjoints.co.uk/)


     


    As for the ashwaghanda, really like the benefits that this is said to have with healing adrenals. Just 500mg a day first thing in the morning with added vitamin C mixed in pink himalayan salty water and of course magnesium at night sounds as though it might rock. Already taking the C (2000mg) and magnesium glycinate (400mg) (play around with magnesium oil and liked that too although somewhat sticky on the body).  Looking forward to taking this new additional adaptogen herb.


     


    Rhodiola is something we will have to save for later as we evaluate slowly for now.


     


    Quick plug again: astragalus is awesome on a cold day if you are trying to keep warm on these winter days outside. Shameless.


     


    Lastly has anyone tried a decent Kava Tea?


     


    There has been so many conflicting reports about how serious liver damage etc....has been caused by Kava, even in short term use. We'd like this one resolved by users that have ever tried it.


    We think Dave talked about the kava tea as a great sleep hack somewhere. Just not sure exactly what dose or form he drank though. The dosage in most tea bags are so low that you`d need about 20 tea bags to get anything near the plant extracts of 70% kavalactones. Although week in concentration some kavalactones do have MAO-B inhibitors: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1353802099000437


    Most benefits of taking kava are said to be best activated after taking for 2 to 3 months though (not the sleep hack we hope).


    Somewhere it was mentioned that the Kava was mixed with acetone or ethanol (liver damaging) when used as an alcohol type drink. That might explain the liver damage stories but not sure.


    Kava by itself does have an anti anxiety effect anyway and has been used as a remedy for tension and restlessness http://link.springer.com/article/10.2165/00023210-200216110-00002


    In the US it is legal in most forms but in Canada, France and the Netherlands it is supposed to be banned. In the UK and Australia it is restricted but not banned.


    Maybe this is only for the root extract powders and not the herbal tea bags. Maybe some kind individuals can update us all on those facts.


     


    Okay we think Dave had this Kava tea:https://www.yogiproducts.com/teas/kava-stress-relief/


    It`s a blend of cinnamon, carob pod and Sarsaparilla. Strangely Sarsaparilla is another root herb and often used to treat liver/kidney problems (detox).


  • Do dried herbs need to be refrigerated? We keep a draw full of beautifully organized dry herbs. I'm concerned that if I put them in the fridge, they would just get lost... 


  • NickatNickat
    edited December 2014


    Do dried herbs need to be refrigerated? We keep a draw full of beautifully organized dry herbs. I'm concerned that if I put them in the fridge, they would just get lost... 




     


    Refrigerators do have a slight humid environment which could alter the flavour of your herbs and spices.


    Not recommend ;-( but as long as they are stored in an air tight containers maybe you could try freezing them.


    If you keep them for long periods at room temperature and in the dark like a draw they should keep for sometime. If they are powdered forms be more concerned then leaf or stem cuts.


    Contamination, light and humidity can be problems which is why larger quantities are often freezer stored.


  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited December 2014

    the mention of Sarsaparilla made me just do a bit of quick googling,


    i think i may append a sarsaparilla supp to my next iherb order, just for the hellavit, & see if i notice anything,


     


    here are the two iherb options i am looking at, any comments appreciated, does one look better than the other (why),


    1. Nature's Way, Sarsaparilla, Root, 100 Capsules


    2. Nature's Herbs, Sarsaparilla Root, 100 Capsules


     


    thx


    fake it till you make it

  • elaela
    edited December 2014

    Love this discussion! I enjoy astragalus, and since I feel the cold to an extreme I'll definitely bump up my consumption of it.


     


    Herbs in food (it's a really fine line, especially when you consider things like arugula/wild mustard/mustard --when is it a weed and when an herb? Algae--food or supplement?) and as medicine/supplement--so foundational. Dosage is a huge deal, especially when you get into making tinctures or using capsules.


    Wrt the sarsaparilla, I'd strongly suggest getting some cut/sifted root and make it into tea rather than buying capsules. I love that stuff. Subtle effect, but I feel like my digestive tract has been 'straightened  out' after sarsaparilla tea (which I often combine in a tea with sassafras and holy basil).


     


    Ashwagandha: it makes me climb the walls! I read somewhere that it acts on the GABA pathways in a certain way such that it causes anxiety for some but is anxiolytic in others. Sorry I don't understand that better. A naturopath also told me that ashwagandha is more specific for males. But I've tried it several times, in different formulations, and it doesn't work in my body.


     


    What about ginseng? I love to combine ginseng with reishi and chaga.


     


    I do love rhodiola--instant calm. Relora is pretty good too. Oh, and passiflora (passionflower), lemon balm, linden--all of them just as infusions. Really soothing, help with sleep.


    Kava infusion, even cold infusion, is instantly calming...until it rips your guts to shreds (that was my experience, anyway) -- I just couldn't continue using it.


     


    Chamomile tea helps with digestion and sleep, and can knock out a headache, but it has hormone-balancing effects too.


     


    Turmeric: you know that it's good to have black pepper together with it? And both of them plus chlorella (and cilantro?) even better.


     


    Ginger is wonderful. Cloves too, parasite killers and all. Slippery elm saves my life.


    I'm with Dave on not favoring garlic and onions. Simply don't tolerate them well, and have clearly observed cognitive impairment when I've experimented eating them, not to mention the gastric distress.


     


    Oh, gosh, and don't forget nettles! They're delicious, and they're just unbelievably nutritious. Strong tea, but freshly steamed like spinach, or made into pesto, or in a smoothie... I don't know whether to call it one of my favorite herbs or foods. Just not its sting.


     


    My very favorite spice is cardamom. I think some of that is my ethnic background (middle eastern) but it really is just divine to me. Soothing, too. And I'm not a coffee drinker, but if you give me that thick, muddy Levantine black coffee with lots of cardamom in it, I'll drink cup after cup.




  • the mention of Sarsaparilla made me just do a bit of quick googling,


    i think i may append a sarsaparilla supp to my next iherb order, just for the hellavit, & see if i notice anything,


     


    here are the two iherb options i am looking at, any comments appreciated, does one look better than the other (why),


    1. Nature's Way, Sarsaparilla, Root, 100 Capsules


    2. Nature's Herbs, Sarsaparilla Root, 100 Capsules


     


    thx




     


     


    Think the second looks better because it has the added Bioperine that will help with the absorption. It also lists more of the content too so it looks like you know what you're taking.


    Not sure if you'll notice too much or not but it will protective your liver against toxins so should be kinda interesting feedback if you do take it. Maybe pay attention to inflammation too.


    Remember that has been recommended to get cut/sifted root and make that into tea but if capsules are what your gonna do cool. Report back your findings.


     


     




    Love this discussion! I enjoy astragalus, and since I feel the cold to an extreme I'll definitely bump up my consumption of it.


     


    Herbs in food (it's a really fine line, especially when you consider things like arugula/wild mustard/mustard --when is it a weed and when an herb? Algae--food or supplement?) and as medicine/supplement--so foundational. Dosage is a huge deal, especially when you get into making tinctures or using capsules.


    Wrt the sarsaparilla, I'd strongly suggest getting some cut/sifted root and make it into tea rather than buying capsules. I love that stuff. Subtle effect, but I feel like my digestive tract has been 'straightened  out' after sarsaparilla tea (which I often combine in a tea with sassafras and holy basil).


     


    Ashwagandha: it makes me climb the walls! I read somewhere that it acts on the GABA pathways in a certain way such that it causes anxiety for some but is anxiolytic in others. Sorry I don't understand that better. A naturopath also told me that ashwagandha is more specific for males. But I've tried it several times, in different formulations, and it doesn't work in my body.


     


    What about ginseng? I love to combine ginseng with reishi and chaga.


     


    I do love rhodiola--instant calm. Relora is pretty good too. Oh, and passiflora (passionflower), lemon balm, linden--all of them just as infusions. Really soothing, help with sleep.


    Kava infusion, even cold infusion, is instantly calming...until it rips your guts to shreds (that was my experience, anyway) -- I just couldn't continue using it.


     


    Chamomile tea helps with digestion and sleep, and can knock out a headache, but it has hormone-balancing effects too.


     


    Turmeric: you know that it's good to have black pepper together with it? And both of them plus chlorella (and cilantro?) even better.


     


    Ginger is wonderful. Cloves too, parasite killers and all. Slippery elm saves my life.


    I'm with Dave on not favoring garlic and onions. Simply don't tolerate them well, and have clearly observed cognitive impairment when I've experimented eating them, not to mention the gastric distress.


     


    Oh, gosh, and don't forget nettles! They're delicious, and they're just unbelievably nutritious. Strong tea, but freshly steamed like spinach, or made into pesto, or in a smoothie... I don't know whether to call it one of my favorite herbs or foods. Just not its sting.


     


    My very favorite spice is cardamom. I think some of that is my ethnic background (middle eastern) but it really is just divine to me. Soothing, too. And I'm not a coffee drinker, but if you give me that thick, muddy Levantine black coffee with lots of cardamom in it, I'll drink cup after cup.




     


     


    Nice info Ela. Great input and personal insight. Thank you. The cardamom black coffee reminds Nic of his childhood in the middle east. He loves the herb and is crazy mad on the stuff.


    As for nettles he has been known to go pick the young fresh leaves and cook them like spinach too. They are a little like the Greek Horta served with a little butter and lemon. Yummy.


    Just a curious question about the medicinal effects that Sassafras gives you. Are you sure that is a good idea to take? Some bad reports on the stuff although it appears to be used often as a medicinal remedy.


  •  


    Nice info Ela. Great input and personal insight. Thank you. The cardamom black coffee reminds Nic of his childhood in the middle east. He loves the herb and is crazy mad on the stuff.


    As for nettles he has been known to go pick the young fresh leaves and cook them like spinach too. They are a little like the Greek Horta served with a little butter and lemon. Yummy.


    Just a curious question about the medicinal effects that Sassafras gives you. Are you sure that is a good idea to take? Some bad reports on the stuff although it appears to be used often as a medicinal remedy.



     


    Nice to see another middle-eastern cardamom-lover! I'm not Greek (Israeli) but have studied both Ancient and modern Greek very extensively (am a translator). When I lived in Alaska, I ate pretty much nothing but nettles in the springtime! Just like horta, just like spinach, (but I used coconut oil instead of butter because I can't stand butter).


     


    As far as sassafras--good point. I tend to use it more as a flavoring. For example, if I'm doing a liver-support decoction with dandelion/burdock/sarsaparilla/sassafras, I'll put a quarter to half as much sassafras as the others (interestingly, sassafras is about twice as expensive as the other three). And I don't use it every day--maybe once every ten days. And even more importantly, I don't use it in a capsule, only as cut/sifted root. I just wrote a blog post about making myself sick (trip) overdosing on a homemade tincture; once you tincture or encapsulate herbs, it's much easier to overdose. When you stick to tea/decoction, it's much easier to monitor how it's affecting you.


    Just my experience/opinions...

  • NickatNickat
    edited December 2014

    Had to look up Decoction: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decoction  :ph34r:


     


    Like the nettle weed, we see and avoid or tread down on beneath our feet; the Dandelion is a powerful free herb for us all. In this case though instead of the green leaves of nettles it is the root where we want to extract the goodness from.


     


    Dandelion root stimulates liver bile. It is this bile as an alkaline fluid that is so important to the function of the liver. It digests fats and other crucial nutrients such as fat-soluble vitamins. The important role of removing fat-soluble toxins through bile production can be attributed to the taraxcin in the dandelion root: A bitter compound that is said to stimulate digestion and produces HCL, help bile flow from both the liver and even the gallbladder. It’s also a source of choline that is another bile stimulant and contains inulin that is said to help balance blood sugar.


     


    Used as a detoxifier and eliminator the dandelion is both rich in nutrients and minerals.


     


    Further reading: http://www.raysahelian.com/dandelion.html


    How to make the tea: http://www.livestrong.com/article/16368-make-dandelion-root-tea/


     


    You can also buy capsules of the root powder or bitters that use the sesquiterpene lactones. 


  • After a long absence, I'm back!


     


    Anyway, for herbs I would suggest:


     


    - Turmeric - lots of anti-cancer properties. Most importantly, pretty well studied for the claims


     


    - Fenugreek - can improve testosterone; results vary, but it is definitely worth a try given the quality of studies showing positive results. ALSO (very important for BP dieters), fenugreek can naturally stimulate the insulin receptor for greater uptake rather than simple carbs. This is particularly useful for people using creatine or other supplements


     


    - Bacopa monnieri - lots of research and generally very useful for the brain. Probably one of the more well-researched Ayurvedic / Chinese medicines


  • edited January 2015

    I figured that with source of information about herbs I have acces to, I shouldn't stay quiet.


    Gynostemma Pentaphyllum:


    Asian adaptogenic herb with antimicrobial, immunostimullantory properties


    *Farmacological effects:


    Immunostimullantory (increases IgG, white blood cell count and phagocytosis,), Anti-inflammatory, lowering cholesterol and triglicerids levels, adaptogenic, lowering elevated blood pressure, anti-atherosclerotic, improve cognitive abilities and mental (cognitive), lipotropics, steatosis and cirrhosis inhibiting,  inhibiting formation of gallstones, Anti-cancer , Antimicrobial, Stops micotoxin production in intestines (source: Srichana D, Taengtip R, Kondo S.: Antimicrobial activity of Gynostemma pentaphyllum extracts against fungi producing aflatoxin and fumonisin and bacteria causing diarrheal disease (Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2011 May;42(3):704-10.)


    Other studies: Cheng TC, Lu JF, Wang JS, Lin LJ, Kuo HI, Chen BH.: Antiproliferation effect and apoptosis mechanism of prostate cancer cell PC-3 by flavonoids and saponins prepared from Gynostemma pentaphyllum (J Agric Food Chem. 2011 Oct 26;59(20):11319-29. Epub 2011 Sep 26.); Qin R, Zhang J, Li C, Zhang X, Xiong A, Huang F, Yin Z, Li K, Qin W, Chen M, Zhang S, Liang L, Zhang H, Nie H, Ye W.: Protective effects of gypenosides against fatty liver disease induced by high fat and cholesterol diet and alcohol in rats (Arch Pharm Res. 2012 Jul;35(7):1241-50. Epub 2012 Aug 3);Chen JC, Tsai CC, Chen LD, Chen HH, Wang WC.: Therapeutic effect of gypenoside on chronic liver injury and fibrosis induced by CCl4 in rats, opublikowane w Am J Chin Med. 2000;28(2);


     


    I think we should create bullet proof infographic describing most usefull herbs


  • NickatNickat
    edited February 2015

    Great idea. We see Dave has started a Spices and Flavouring infographics and are sure that this could be expanded upon.


    Nice collaborated project for those that read the thread maybe. Any takers?


     


    This is Dave`s take on some things already mentioned:


     


    07BulletproofDietSpicesFlavorings.jpg


     


    Buying Herbs & Spices

     

    •It’s not a good idea to keep a wide variety of herbs and spices unless you use

    them up frequently. Old spices sitting in cabinets are a *major* source of toxins

    in kitchens today.

     

    •Choose leaf-based herbs like oregano, thyme, sage, and parsley because these

    have a lower mycotoxin content.

     

    •The powdered spices like nutmeg and cloves are often contaminated with mold.

    Go for whole herbs when you can. Quality and freshness really matter here.

     

    •Black pepper is almost always moldy. Soy sauce is too.

     

    •Garlic and onion powders are often moldy and negatively effect cognitive performance.

    Better to use these as medicinal herbs or sparingly.

     

    •Never buy a spice mix or anything with spice extractives, flavors, etc.

     

    •Buy cayenne pepper in the vitamin aisle and break open a capsule to use in

    cooking. It’s perfectly fresh every time.

     

     

    Dave also says:

     


    Imported spices can often be contaminated with insect parts, animal hairs, various molds and other microscopic fragments.


    The FDA has rather loose regulations on this. The article notes that a two-ounce jar of paprika must have about 170 insect fragments to be considered bad. Yuck.


     


    The FDA is the regulatory authority in the US, and their policies oftentimes drive global food safety policies, especially when things like the CODEX treaty are used to enforce international compliance


     


    with lower food standards without congressional oversight.


     


    Look at the chart to see which imported spices have the most problems. It includes data on mold counts, insects, and other filth. Another great reason to grow your own herbs and spices!


     


    0A4887EC-F4C1-4144-A31A80D4488A7B56_land


    WARNING


     


    Although most herbs and spices do have health and antioxidant functions, health gut flora impact etc...


     


    It is is extremely important to source or grow your own to avoid spoilage issues.


    Spoilage can occur in the growing, production, distribution and storage stages of the herbs and spices in question.


     


    Go clean, fresh and choose wisely when contributing to the infographics please.


    If you have too, add brands that are top quality. Ask yourself the question are herbs and spices protected because they are infused in a liquid (oil based perhaps) etc... before adding them.


    Personally we find it strange that breaking open a capsule of cayenne pepper would be better then any other herb or spice in a capsule if it was a top brand and quality?


    Maybe you`d like to draw up your own conclusions from that one.


     


    If you are allergic to any herb or spice or have a medical condition then these should be considered your own health problem and not those attributed with the herb or spice mentioned because of your condition.


     


    UPDATE



     


    The New York State attorney general’s office accused four national retailers on Monday of selling dietary supplements that were fraudulent and in many cases contaminated with unlisted ingredients.


    The authorities said they had run tests on popular store brands of herbal supplements at the retailers — Walmart, Walgreens, Target and GNC — which showed that roughly four out of five of the products contained none of the herbs listed on their labels. In many cases, the authorities said, the supplements contained little more than cheap fillers like rice and house plants, or substances that could be hazardous to people with food allergies.


     


    Here are the products that were analyzed by the attorney general, along with the test results that were described in cease-and-desist letters that the agency sent to the four retailers.


     


    From GNC, Herbal Plus brand:


     


    Gingko Biloba:


    • No gingko biloba found
    • Did detect allium (garlic), rice, spruce and asparagus

    St. John’s Wort


    • No St. John’s Wort found
    • Did detect allium (garlic), rice and dracaena (a tropical houseplant)

    Ginseng


    • No ginseng found
    • Did detect rice, dracaena, pine, wheat/grass and citrus

    Garlic


    • Contained garlic

    Echinacea


    • No echinacea found
    • Did detect rice in some samples

    Saw Palmetto


    • One sample contained the clear presence of palmetto
    • Other samples contained a variety of ingredients, including asparagus, rice and primrose

    From Target, Up & Up brand


     


    Gingko Biloba


    • No gingko biloba found
    • Found garlic, rice and mung/French bean

    St. John’s Wort


    • No St. John’s Wort found
    • Found garlic, rice and dracaena (houseplant)

    Garlic


    • Contained garlic
    • One test identified no DNA

    Echinacea


    • Most but not all tests detected Echinacea
    • One test identified rice

    Saw Palmetto


    • Most tests detected saw palmetto
    • Some tests found no plant DNA

    Valerian Root


    • No valerian root found
    • Found allium, bean, asparagus, pea family, rice, wild carrot and saw palmetto

    From Walgreens, Finest Nutrition brand


     


    Gingko Biloba


    • No gingko biloba found
    • Did detect rice

    St. John’s Wort


    • No St. John’s Wort found
    • Detected garlic, rice and dracaena

    Ginseng


    • No ginseng found
    • Detected garlic and rice

    Garlic


    • No garlic found
    • Detected palm, dracaena, wheat and rice

    Echinacea


    • No echinacea found
    • Identified garlic, rice and daisy

    Saw Palmetto


    • Contained saw palmetto

    From Walmart, Spring Valley brand


     


    Gingko Biloba


    • No gingko biloba found
    • Found rice, dracaena, mustard, wheat and radish

    St. John’s Wort


    • No St. John’s Wort found
    • Detected garlic, rice and cassava

    Ginseng


    • No ginseng found
    • Found rice, dracaena, pine, wheat/grass and citrus

    Garlic


    • One sample showed small amounts of garlic
    • Found rice, pine, palm, dracaena and wheat

    Echinacea


    • No echinacea or plant material found

    Saw Palmetto


    • Some samples contained small amounts of saw palmetto
    • Also found garlic and rice

     


    re: http://mobile.nytimes.com/blogs/well/2015/02/03/sidebar-whats-in-those-supplements/?ref=health&_r=1&referrer


  • edited January 2015

    I am definitely interested in helping with it. I think we should divide this infographic into categories (for example Adaptogens, Antioxidants, Detoxifiers, Testosterone increasing, Immunostimmulants, High Nutritional Value), and include (five?) best options for each category.


     


    Edit: Wow that infographic is great as weightloss supplement :wink:. Well in my country you can also buy whole (!) black "pepper" which has ingredients listed on it! It was actually made out of roasted mustard seeds with black dye and piperin... 




  • I am definitely interested in helping with it. I think we should divide this infographic into categories (for example Adaptogens, Antioxidants, Detoxifiers, Testosterone increasing, Immunostimmulants, High Nutritional Value), and include (five?) best options for each category.


     


    Edit: Wow that infographic is great as weightloss supplement :wink:. Well in my country you can also buy whole (!) black "pepper" which has ingredients listed on it! It was actually made out of roasted mustard seeds with black dye and piperin... 




     


     


    Go for it Sirocco, start creating your take on the advanced infographic and categories. Others will chip in too.


    That`s the thing really, although the BP diet is great, geographical location most certainly plays a very important hand in the decisions, cost and availability of almost everything Dave recommends.

  • Oh, this is so interesting! I'd love to see a full infographic and contribute to it. Herbs and spices are so crucial, I think, and I appreciate the diligence on quality.


    There are so many ways to organize--from what part of the world/medical system (Chinese, Ayurveda, Amazonian, Native American, European), what part of the plant (or insect) is used, what season of the year, and what qualities it has, just for starters.


     


    Nickat--appreciated your thoughts on dandelion, and wanted to add that another neat thing with dandelion is you can use every part of the plant depending on the season/life cycle. Dandelion greens are also cleansing to the liver in early spring--"spring cleaning." You can make wine and vinegar from the flowers. And the root, yes, a long slow tea, but I make tinctures from the root for more concentrated liver medicine, sometimes in combination with some ginger. Burdock's another good companion.


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