Nutritional Benefits Of Herbs In The Bp Diet.

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  • NickatNickat
    edited January 2015

    Oh, this is so interesting! I'd love to see a full infographic and contribute to it. Herbs and spices are so crucial, I think, and I appreciate the diligence on quality.

    There are so many ways to organize--from what part of the world/medical system (Chinese, Ayurveda, Amazonian, Native American, European), what part of the plant (or insect) is used, what season of the year, and what qualities it has, just for starters.


    Nickat--appreciated your thoughts on dandelion, and wanted to add that another neat thing with dandelion is you can use every part of the plant depending on the season/life cycle. Dandelion greens are also cleansing to the liver in early spring--"spring cleaning." You can make wine and vinegar from the flowers. And the root, yes, a long slow tea, but I make tinctures from the root for more concentrated liver medicine, sometimes in combination with some ginger. Burdock's another good companion.



    Excellent to see you on board with The Sirocco Plan ela. That's the thing about creating a full infographic of this nature...it opens up a wealth of information by those in the know and actually practice what they preach.


    All that needs to be done is to adopt Dave's BP findings and back up the research with unbiased medical papers on the examples used.


    May we suggest that anyone reading or wanting to participate in the contribution of this infographic do so by submitting their ideas (here in this thread) in the same format as used by Dave to begin with.

    A short description as to the thoughts behind it etc... Maybe then when we have a collection of data and as a collective, we agreement a strategy to formulate the actual infographic(s).

    All welcome.

  • I strongly agree about superiority of oil infused herbs. Before we start designing infographic We need to create an outline of facts we want to include. First we should start by collecting data. Please include reason why you think a particular herb is important enough that we should include it, because we wont be able to include all of them;also links or names of studies are very appreciated. I think that format below would be good for organising facts about each plant.


     


    Herb\Plant Name:


    Role: Detox\ImmuneRegulation\Testosterone\Cardiovascular\Muscle etc. By role I mean a category in which the herb works


    Effect: Stops Gallbladder stone formation\ Lowers triglicerids count etc. Basiccally Include ALL of the effects the plant has


    Form: Tincture\Oil extract\ Capsuled Powder\ Capsuled Extract\ Tea etc. Form in which herb can be used; best absorption in bold


    Dosing: X ml of tincture 2 times a day etc. Simply recommended dosage.


    Warnings: Do not use while pregnat etc. All side effects, Interactions need to be extensively researched


    Other: Include all commentary you want, especially notable facts and best brands (if available)


     


     




     


    There are so many ways to organize--from what part of the world/medical system (Chinese, Ayurveda, Amazonian, Native American, European), what part of the plant (or insect) is used, what season of the year, and what qualities it has, just for starters.


     




    Nice to see interest! I think that organising it by effect types would be best, because effect the herb has matters the most.


  • CycloneCyclone rich in satisfats
    edited January 2015

    Does piperine have similar effects to the compound in grapefruit juice? Something in grapefruit juice binds to and enzyme in your intestinal tract known as CYP3A4 which slows down your body's ability to process foreign compounds.


     


    I don't think I'd mess with this (particularly on a daily basis). Considering the abundance of toxins in our world, are you sure you want to reduce your bodies ability to deal with them on a daily basis?


    This study makes it look like it just increases absorption of drugs, but what does that mean in layman's terms? Sounds like increased gut permeability which is usually a bad thing.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20492299

  • NickatNickat
    edited January 2015


    Does piperine have similar effects to the compound in grapefruit juice? Something in grapefruit juice binds to and enzyme in your intestinal tract known as CYP3A4 which slows down your body's ability to process foreign compounds.


     


    I don't think I'd mess with this (particularly on a daily basis). Considering the abundance of toxins in our world, are you sure you want to reduce your bodies ability to deal with them on a daily basis?


    This study makes it look like it just increases absorption of drugs, but what does that mean in layman's terms? Sounds like increased gut permeability which is usually a bad thing.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20492299




     


     


     


     


    A single glass of grapefruit juice has the potential to augment the oral bioavailability and to enhance the beneficial or adverse effects of a broad range of medications, even by juice consumed hours beforehand. Grapefruit juice acts by inhibiting presystemic drug metabolism mediated by CYP3A isoforms in the small bowel. 


     


    It seems similar in interaction with some medicines  : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1873672/


  • As far as I'm concerned piperin works by enhancing bloodflow in intestines, allowing faster nutrient absorption; it also increases stomach acid acidity. Its also strong PDE4 inhibitor, I wonder if it would make good addition to CILTEP?


    As for Infographic development: I'm currently working on adaptogenics. Decided to write about Schisandra, Rhodiola, Eleutherococcus, Uncaria (Cat's claw/ AC11) and panax ginseng.


     I think that five herbs for each category are enough. What do You think? I may expand after plotting basic design, don't really know how much I informations I can put...

  • NickatNickat
    edited January 2015


    As far as I'm concerned piperin works by enhancing bloodflow in intestines, allowing faster nutrient absorption; it also increases stomach acid acidity. Its also strong PDE4 inhibitor, I wonder if it would make good addition to CILTEP?


    As for Infographic development: I'm currently working on adaptogenics. Decided to write about Schisandra, Rhodiola, Eleutherococcus, Uncaria (Cat's claw/ AC11) and panax ginseng.


     I think that five herbs for each category are enough. What do You think? I may expand after plotting basic design, don't really know how much I informations I can put...




     


    Sounds great.


     


    For adaptogenics we thought these would be a good start:


     


    Rhodiola rosea, Ginseng (In particular Eleutherococcus senticosus as this is the Siberian species that is strongest), Gynostemma Pentaphyllum and Schisandra. Looks like we are almost on the same page here.


     

    We posted a little about Panax Ginseng here: http://forum.bulletproofexec.com/index.php?/topic/14090-anybody-here-have-any-type-2-diabetes-insights/page-2#entry111190


     


    The other herbs we broke down into categories of: Flower, Seeds, Stem, Leaves, Bark, Resin and Root. We left out fruit as a category to save confusion right now but don`t see why this shouldn't be added later.


    So along those lines we thought the following would be BP:


     


    Seeds/Beans


     


    Vanilla seeds


    Rosehip seeds


    Cocoa bean


    Piperine (extract from Black Pepper)


    Cloves seed      


    Cardamom seed 


    Milk Thistle Daisy (Silybum marianum) seeds *


                     


    *Silibinin or silybin (both extracts from Silybum marianum seeds that make up traditional milk thistle mixture)


     


    Flowers


     


    Linden flowers


    Chamomile flowers


    Dandelion flowers


    Carthamus flower


     


    Leaves


     


    Peppermint leaves 


    Holy Basil leaves 


    Oregano leaves 


    Stevia (extracted from leaves}


    Linden leaves


    Cilantro or Coriander leaves


    Green tea (Extract EGCG)


    Red bush tea 


    Ginkgo Biloba (Extract from the leaves of the Ginkgo tree)     


     


    Tree Bark (whole and not ground)


     


    Ceylon Cinnamon bark  


    Slippery Elm bark


    Linden bark


     


    Root or underground stem (rhizomes)


     


    Dandelion root


    Liquorice root  


    Marshmallow root


    Ginger root   


    Turmeric (Curcumin extract from turmeric) 


    Ashwaganda root


    Astragulus root 


     


    Resin from Tree


     


    Mastic gum


     


    As you can see we particularly think it important to add herb extracts as we believe that they are beneficial in another form (BP and controlled in dosage).  Adaptogenics herbs regulate up or down, so dosage less of a problem.


    As far as dosage in general, we think herbs are there to tweak our diet and not treat an illness or health condition on their own. 


    You're right about putting the info down on each, but hey, anyone interested can look them up (dosage,interactions etc..) and conclude the value of using them or not. Must say the case study data available are unfortunately sketchy by scientific standards on quite a few. Maybe N=1 and reviews here on the thread will come in time and help us all out (positive or not). Time will tell. Help needed guys and gals.


  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭

    ...don't forget stinging nettle, that can be added under leaves And root


    fake it till you make it

  • Does anyone know if Chinese medicinal herbs in loose tea or powdered drink form ( like Jing City, which I've heard great things about) are generally susceptible to molds, fungus, or other toxins thus making them not Bulletproof? I'd love to add herbalism to this lifestyle and loose teas and powders are highly recommended by "herbal" guys I've talked with.

    Thanks!
  • NickatNickat
    edited January 2015


    Does anyone know if Chinese medicinal herbs in loose tea or powdered drink form ( like Jing City, which I've heard great things about) are generally susceptible to molds, fungus, or other toxins thus making them not Bulletproof? I'd love to add herbalism to this lifestyle and loose teas and powders are highly recommended by "herbal" guys I've talked with.

    Thanks!




     


     


     


    Is this a tasty herbal tea that delivers the exacting standards of the Bulletproof Process that includes being imported fresh in a loose leaf form from a single estate?


     


    Does it have to be grown at altitude and washed then dried in a particular way before packaging?


     


    Should it be non-fermented tea that has a little caffeine in it to reduce mold issues?


     


    Is the material used to carry it really safe?


     


    And the question list could go on… Sorry have no idea but...


     


    What we do say though is: A tea with beneficial properties that does have some science to back up the research in the form of proven scientific research goes a very long way in our book of knowledge. We both drink forms of Red Bush, Green Tea and a few other herbal teas without toxic problems of molds. We don`t suffer from brain fog but everyone is different.


    Check to see how fresh the leaves are and if the process of production is seriously monitored or not. Research the properties of the blend and the combination of herbs within it. What dosage are these blends and would they benefit you at all anyway as a good detox etc...?


     


    A little advice about powdered: Although Matcha Green Tea is powdered we think you should be extremely careful as to quality and age because it may possibly harbour more mycotoxins. This could be a problem regardless


    of blend. It`s a storage issue.


     


    Here`s a an article from Truth Calkins that talks about Jing City to get you started on your research:


     


    http://www.thelongevitynowconference.com/bonus/Truth_Jing_City.pdf


     


    May we also recommend you look at:


     


    http://www.dragonherbs.com/qualitycontrol.asp


     


    It is interesting to note that in the case of the adaptogenic grass leaved plant called Gynostemma Pentaphyllum, that is more desirable to have cultivated plants grown at a higher (than it`s normal lower) altitude. The water is purer (more natural water source) and the less bitter taste can be further eliminated. So in this case farmed herbs are more desirable than naturally grown ones. Amazingly this little cucumber family derived plant is said to have sweet scent that later tastes bitter but leaves a sweet aftertaste.


     


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23173881


     


    Anyone tried it?. 


  • NickatNickat
    edited May 2015

    Might be useful at a glance.

    http://calorielab.com/foods/herbs-and-spices/49


    tip: By adding cayenne and mct to your meal increases DIT by over 50%. That`s weight loss and preventive weight gain or regain. Just make sure you are not sensitive to either as food sources.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15507147
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23179202

    Add lemon to add fuel to your fire with some salt as mind blowing shot or make your own hot sauce.

    20150131_190802_zpssz21vovx.jpg


     


    It`s much better if you make a chili paste from fresh chillies instead of the powdered form (paste will be less concentrated so use much more liberally).


    If you like you can store your assembled ingredients in ice cubes in the fridge (bagged) and it should last over 4 months.


     


    Okay I know some of you that meditate don't like the use of garlic, but by adding raw garlic cloves to this mix adds flavour and health benefits: http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/health-benefits-raw-garlic-vs-cooked-garlic-6010.html Just don`t heat it up.


  • NickatNickat
    edited February 2015

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    Jesse is Europe’s #1 Superfood expert. And in this show he gives the top strategies to help you become superhuman through the type of superfoods you should eat.


     


    Thanks Dr.Jones some great stuff on adaptogens.

  • NickatNickat
    edited March 2015

    Top 7 herbs and spices and why they work so well for your body and mind.


     They are:


    1. Turmeric                      iStock_000011723204_Large-300x201.jpg
    2. Cayenne                      iStock_000014911622_Full-300x200.jpg
    3. Ginger                          iStock_000013398712_XXXLarge-300x200.jpg
    4. Cinnamon                        iStock_000015542076_Double-300x228.jpg     
  • NickatNickat
    edited March 2015
    1. Cloves                           iStock_000007420799_Large-300x206.jpg
    2. Sage                                      iStock_000015521476_XXXLarge-200x300.jpg
    3. Rosemary                    iStock_000016007521_Large-254x300.jpg

     


     


     


    Find out more:   https://www.bulletproofexec.com/best-anti-inflammatory-herbs-and-spices/


  • NickatNickat
    edited March 2015

    One of the simplest things you can do to increase your performance is to toss out opened, dried spices that are more than a few months old.


     


     


    DO IT NOW.... big-tick.jpg


    20150307_151607_zpshlwhdops.jpg


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