Emwave 2 Questions From Newbie

I've had this for a while now and haven't quite figured out how to optimally use it.  Here are some questions I have that I hope you all can help me out with:


 


1. If I am also practicing meditation, should I do this on top of it as a separate session, or is it good enough as a substitute for traditional meditation?  


 


I'm doing ok sitting with my eyes closed and breathing and what not.  When I tried to do my normal meditation practice while hooked up to the Emwave I noticed that I wasn't going into coherence at all... AND my breathing rate was much shallower and faster than what the Emwave was telling me to do.


 


2. What type of breathing do you engage in when Emwaving?  Belly breathing?  Chest breathing?  Belly + Chest breathing?  I've noticed that some times when I belly breathe and I'm sitting up right, I can't get enough air in to breath at the same pace as the emwave, and it's only when I add in some chest breathing... or I start lying down/reclining that I can get enough air to synchronize my breathing with the emwave.


 


3. Do you stare at the machine or computer monitor the entire time?  Or do you go eyes closed for a bit and just go with the flow?


 


Thanks!


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Comments

  • edited June 2014

    I personally believe it's a substitute for traditional meditation and likely much more effective since it's guiding you into a state of high coherence. 


     


    I've found chest breathing much more effective than belling breathing. I imagine that I'm breathing air in through the center of my chest / sternum area. I believe the instructions that came with the device suggested this type of breathing. 


     


    I stare at the emwave the entire time. I focus on the lights completely and ignore all distractions around me. I've found that even looking up at the computer screen for a couple seconds is enough to knock me out of high coherence (on the high setting). I will relax my eyes so they're almost closed and maybe even allow them to unfocus. Basically I try to be relaxed as possible. 

    My personal blog : healthbydiet.net

  • I think that being too relaxed hurts your scores.  I used to do all of my sessions on my bed in the lotus position with nobody distracting me.  Strangely, when I started doing sessions in more public places (i.e. in my office or in my car) I was able to sustain higher scores for longer.  No idea why this is other than that the coherence score is a function of parasympathetic and sympathetic balance - not a total transformation to the parasympathetic nervous system - so being on your toes a little bit about who is watching might be contributing to my higher scores.


  • What do your scores typically look like? Also, at what difficulty setting do you emwave?




    I think that being too relaxed hurts your scores.  I used to do all of my sessions on my bed in the lotus position with nobody distracting me.  Strangely, when I started doing sessions in more public places (i.e. in my office or in my car) I was able to sustain higher scores for longer.  No idea why this is other than that the coherence score is a function of parasympathetic and sympathetic balance - not a total transformation to the parasympathetic nervous system - so being on your toes a little bit about who is watching might be contributing to my higher scores.



  • Highest level - I average 5-7 coherence, usually 40-70% in green zone and 500-1000 points.


     




    What do your scores typically look like? Also, at what difficulty setting do you emwave?



  • Impressive. I think you may even have Dave beat with those scores. 


     


     




    Highest level - I average 5-7 coherence, usually 40-70% in green zone and 500-1000 points.



    My personal blog : healthbydiet.net

  • My scores pale in comparison to the thread that was going on last year.  My challenge is sustaining those levels for more than 5 minutes and finding time to do more than 5-10 minutes a day.  I will say that I keep pretty good data about what impacts my coherence scores.


     


    Dave can seem to acheive these scores while driving.  He also takes forskolin which, even at 1mg, likely sent my scores into the toilet.


     




    Impressive. I think you may even have Dave beat with those scores. 



  • Have you guys noticed changes in your everyday lives with your regular practice?


     


    I'm starting to notice an improved ability to see my thoughts as they're happening throughout the day with my normal meditation practice.


    Check out my blogs 

     

    www.bjjcaveman.com

     

    www.theketorash.com

  • Any idea what the title of the thread was? I'd love to read it. 


     


     




    My scores pale in comparison to the thread that was going on last year.  My challenge is sustaining those levels for more than 5 minutes and finding time to do more than 5-10 minutes a day.  I will say that I keep pretty good data about what impacts my coherence scores.


     


    Dave can seem to acheive these scores while driving.  He also takes forskolin which, even at 1mg, likely sent my scores into the toilet.



    My personal blog : healthbydiet.net

  • romansbromansb BulletResistant

    Personally find that if I do it while laying down I'll consistently fall asleep ha. Generally use it at the same time as meditation as a feedback system for it.


     


    Here's some other threads on the EmWave 2:


     


    http://forum.bulletproofexec.com/index.php?/topic/335-emwave-on-highest/


     


    http://forum.bulletproofexec.com/index.php?/topic/4335-actual-success-with-emwave2/


    Where I post my research:
    buildingabetterhuman.com


    "Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication" -Leonardo Da Vinci

  • SystemSystem mod
    edited June 2014

    I have a question for y'all that has been on my mind for a while.


     


    Is HRV similar to weightlifting in that you eventually get better at it over time, even if you don't make tweaks to your technique? Or is it like a golf in that you won't see any progress in your performance if you don't make changes in your swing?


     


    Here are the HRV techniques by which I abide (I use the emwave2):


    • I keep my eyes on the blinking lights the whole time.
    • My breathing is consistent with the lights. When they go up, I breath in; when they go down, I breath out. 
    • I try to imagine myself breathing in and out through my heart area, although it's been difficult for me to do.
    • I reminisce over good memories.

     


     


    In another thread, a HRV certified trainer, AlanStrydom, said that the following in a similar thread: "you begin to build your resilient muscle... much like when you go to the gym for the first time you don't pick up the heaviest weight, but gradually train yourself to do so over time." The full context is here (post #27): http://forum.bulletproofexec.com/index.php?/topic/5041-top-scores-inner-balance-coherence/page-2#entry39626 If I'm understanding him correctly, he's saying that, so long as you're patient, you will see improvements.


     


    Thanks to HealthByDiet's advice, I've been able to improve my scores drastically. While I'm kicking ass on level 2 (medium), I can't seem to have any success on level 3. If what AlanStrydom maintains is true, I should just keep adhering to my techniques and my scores should eventually improve, right?


  • I was just thinking about this today while I was doing my session.  I liken it to shooting free throws - there is a muscle memory that you eventually realize from the combination of the practice and the feedback.  Additional practice eventually enables one to access that muscle memory for longer and longer.  As you raise the difficulty level, it is like raising the rim - where there are new nuances that one needs to develop in order to consistently have high scores at the higher levels.  These include not just practice and feedback but also a good sense of how much stress one is taking on in their life


     




    I have a question for y'all that has been on my mind for a while.


     


    Is HRV similar to weightlifting in that you eventually get better at it over time, even if you don't make tweaks to your technique? Or is it like a golf in that you won't see any progress in your performance if you don't make changes in your swing?


     


    In another thread, a HRV certified trainer, AlanStrydom, said that the following: "you begin to build your resilient muscle... much like when you go to the gym for the first time you don't pick up the heaviest weight, but gradually train yourself to do so over time."


     


    Thanks to HealthByDiet's advice, I've been able to improve my scores drastically. While I'm kicking ass on level 2 (medium), I can't seem to have any success on level 3. If what AlanStrydom maintains is true, I should just keep adhering to my techniques and my scores should eventually improve, right?



  • Being too relaxed is definitely a negative. I had the pleasure of being taught emwave by emwave people when my agency was doing a project for them.


     


    They explained to us that coherence does not happen when you are deeply in the sympathetic nervous system, or when you are deeply in the parasympathetic nervous system. Meaning, it does not occur when you are too relaxed, or too anxious. Instead, it happens when you are between the two. What's cool is that this is quantifiable - being in a harmonious place between the 2 extremes means you are around .1 (hz?) on their "spectrum".


     


    I try to go for feeling "calm and alert".

  • Oh! I also got to do a training up at their institute with one of their full time trainers. She told me about her personal practice -  she uses the the emwave 2 while meditating on a cushion.


     


    She puts it under her leg with the audio on, so she can faintly hear the sounds to indicate if she is in green or not. So she has a traditional-looking sitting mediation practice, but with this auditory assistance, letting her know she was in the zone. 


     


    Not sure what she was doing mentally of course. There is so much variety in ways to meditate! 

  • That makes sense. One of my best emwave results came when I was sitting in a parked car in a parking lot, scared and paranoid that people would think I'm a weirdo. While I was calm, I was also alert.



    Being too relaxed is definitely a negative. I had the pleasure of being taught emwave by emwave people when my agency was doing a project for them.


    They explained to us that coherence does not happen when you are deeply in the sympathetic nervous system, or when you are deeply in the parasympathetic nervous system. Meaning, it does not occur when you are too relaxed, or too anxious. Instead, it happens when you are between the two. What's cool is that this is quantifiable - being in a harmonious place between the 2 extremes means you are around .1 (hz?) on their "spectrum".


    I try to go for feeling "calm and alert".

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