Microwaving Grass Fed Beef?

I am a college student who has access to grass fed beef. Unfortunatley, the dorms only allow microwaves as a method of cooking. I have researched the dangers on microwaves and know that Dave is against it, but I have not found any solid studies on microwaves being dangerous. My question is, should I microwave my grass fed beef, or will microwaving it destroy the benifits? Also, what research has Dave talked about the microwave being harmful?


 


 


Comments

  • Danno RedDanno Red Practical Man

    Microwave water in a pyrex measuring cup and put meat in small pieces in that...some of the good stuff comes out but dang, runaway heating is bound to create nasty things in the microwave by just tossing a pile of meat on a plate and giving it a zap. If you do take this approach, skim off the fat that floats in the water and spoon it back onto the meat. Or you could ziplock bag the meat (plastic is frowned upon too though!) and bring water to a near boil, put the bag in til the water cools, remove the bag, reheat the water and replace the bag in the water until you've reached the desired doneness. Sous vide dorm-room style!


  • ACH85ACH85 ✭✭
    edited June 2014

    In college I stashed an electric griddle in my dorm room and made pancakes on my desk. I was not caught. Maybe a crock pot and slow cooking?


     


    You do have a bit of a moral obligation to prevent a fire, so don't do something stupid like hide a plugged in crock pot under your bed. You need to leave it out and away from flammable stuff while you're cooking. Set it up right and you can go to class and come back to cooked food. 


     


    If you are worried about the delicious smells of cooking wafting out under your door and into the hallway: get a fan, cut cardboard such that it completely blocks your open window except for a circle the same size as the fan blades, and have the fan blowing out through this hole. You will have created a low pressure zone in your dorm room, and therefore air will be sucked from the hallway under your door and out the window. With a stiff breeze from the hallway into your room, any scents in your room cannot get into the hall. You can test this by holding a lighter in front of the crack under the door, there will be a significant breeze and the flame will blow back and burn your thumb. Once you have this as a proof of concept, you can charge less-enterprising stoners to create this exhaust system for their rooms, and use the money to support your grass-fed beef habit. Toweling the door is for chumps. 


  • Danno RedDanno Red Practical Man

    OK, if we're opening this up to cheating solutions (cheating decreases HRV unless you're trained) get a little dipper mini crockpot. SUPER small and easy to hide...can cook a single serving.




    In college I stashed an electric griddle in my dorm room and made pancakes on my desk. I was not caught. Maybe a crock pot and slow cooking?


     


    You do have a bit of a moral obligation to prevent a fire, so don't do something stupid like hide a plugged in crock pot under your bed. You need to leave it out and away from flammable stuff while you're cooking. Set it up right and you can go to class and come back to cooked food. 


     


    If you are worried about the delicious smells of cooking wafting out under your door and into the hallway: get a fan, cut cardboard such that it completely blocks your open window except for a circle the same size as the fan blades, and have the fan blowing out through this hole. You will have created a low pressure zone in your dorm room, and therefore air will be sucked from the hallway under your door and out the window. With a stiff breeze from the hallway into your room, any scents in your room cannot get into the hall. You can test this by holding a lighter in front of the crack under the door, there will be a significant breeze and the flame will blow back and burn your thumb. Once you have this as a proof of concept, you can charge less-enterprising stoners to create this exhaust system for their rooms, and use the money to support your grass-fed beef habit. Toweling the door is for chumps. 



  • edited June 2014
    Haha I appreciate the ideas guys, but I am on a moral obligation and I intend to stay true to that. Here's the thing, I tested putting beef in the microwave, and besides a few "rubbery" parts (probably just from uneven heating) it tasted and looked the same as cooking it on the stove top! I even felt good after eating it! I would just like to see solid evidence on the microwaves danger, because so far I haven't seen any ill health effects from it. Thanks for the replies I thoroughly appreciate it :D
  • ACH85ACH85 ✭✭

    Damn, I think I broke at least one rule every day I was at college, just not the academic ones. 


     


    The concept is that the microwaves damage the proteins in food. Some of them may switch from L to R oriented proteins which are less/not bioavailable and potentially harmful. Also that it's bad to be around it as it's in use because some microwaves escape and hit you. There are a few threads around here, but to be honest I haven't seen the type of evidence that will make me avoid microwaves at all costs. I do think it would be better to use the microwave to heat water, then the hot water to heat the meat. 


     


    Grilling is higher on the infographic than microwaving. At my college we were allowed to grill outside, either with one or two permanent grills or with our own grill if it was on pavement. You might check the rules on that. Is there anything that says you can't use the hot plates in the science labs for cooking? What if you did an independent study on cooking methods and academic performance or something? 


  • edited June 2014
    So if I heated the water in the dish that I usually put the beef in (a big covered dish) and then put the meat in after and let it steam, that would be better? That would absolutly be an easy option. Ill have to try that out! I could probably do some more research to see if slow cookers are allowed, so I will post when I get that answer. Also, an independent study would definitly be something to look into. My major is communications, but nutrition and the bulletproof concept really caught my attention. Maybe I will minor in nutrition! haha
  • If you do the nutrition thing, be aware that what they teach you is going to be very very different from what you see here.

    Men are undoubtedly more in danger from prosperity than adversity.  For when matters go smoothly, they flatter themselves, and are intoxicated by their success.  ~John Calvin

     

     

  • ACH85ACH85 ✭✭

    "Steaming" generally means the meat doesn't touch the water. I think Dan's first post was saying to put the meat directly in the now-hot microwaved water for cooking. In podcast 130 Dave talks about making a veggie soup and putting meat in there, and letting the heat of the soup cook the meat into a stew kind of thing. I *think* proteins are the biggest problem in a microwave, so perhaps you could blend up a veggie soup, get that piping hot in the microwave, and then add meat and let it cook in the soup for a bit before eating it. I've done that successfully with eggs poaching in the soup. 


     




    So if I heated the water in the dish that I usually put the beef in (a big covered dish) and then put the meat in after and let it steam, that would be better? 



  • Good news! I contacted the school website and she said anything without a open hot plate is fine (toaster ovens, hot plate coffee makers, ect) what is something that can cook beef without a hot plate?
  • sous vide You can make one with a temp controller and a crock pot. Search Amazon for sous vide. You will need a vacuum sealer as well. No stray odors either.


    We are here to help others. What the others are here for, I have no idea.

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