Paleo Life Coaching As A Career

I want to help people for a living and of course I think paleo coaching is a way to make the most impact in regular people's lives. What I'm not sure about is steps to take. I basically want to be like my version of The Paleo Chef, Mary. She's pretty much my idol. Preparing meals, cooking, and coaching. Crushing life. I want to give people a reason to listen to me though. People seem to like pieces of paper as "proof" that you can do something for them and as a reason to trust what you tell them.


What are some schools, programs, certifications that are appropriate for this type of career? Is it even necessary to or mandatory to have something on paper that says you're certified paleo life coach? Are there programs for this specifically? Or would it be more like becoming a holistic nutrition therapist/coach and then building off of that? I guess you can say I'm looking for guidance.


 


I'm 23 years old and I'm ready to start my life. No more wasting time in regular college going nowhere, doing nothing to help anyone. I want to go out into the world and help people, make a difference in someone's life. I still live with my parents in the ghetto and I refuse to be a part of this type of existance any longer. I just don't know exactly where to start other than continuously educate myself each day since I can do that for free. As far as taking action and making moves? It's confusing. Any advice would be appreciated.


Comments

  • Star ChaserStar Chaser Powered by Shred

    The first thing I look at when I decide whether to accept someone as a health guru is whether they look healthy or not. As another example, I accept Dave as a cognition guru because he barely ever drops words or uses pause words. It comes very apparent when you match him up with an "average joe" in an interview (much like myself). I use pause words all the time.


    Get really, really good at walking the talk and people will naturally want to know what the hell you're doing.


    I am a Video Game composer under the pseudonym Star Chaser.

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  • edited June 2014

    Write up what you want to sell and how you want to sell it.


     


    Do you want just one on one consults, do you want to run classes, do you want to do packages like a 6 week health reboot?


     


    Write up some idea's on how to sell and market your product, work out why people will want to buy your product and what kind of people to target and what people are willing to pay.


     


    Youtube videos and social media are great marketing tools, share ideas and collaborate with others.


     


    Then maybe stock products and on sell them, like you might wholesale buy stuff from upgraded self then on sell it at retail price.


     


    One awesome thing about being a health coach is you don't need a place of business you can store stock in your house and just be mobile and go to peoples houses clean up their house and give them advice, take them to markets and teach them how to get the right foods, work out deals with like a wholefoods shop that you take clients to, could be like a 10% discount for them and wholesale pricing for your personal items seeing you bring them business.


  • StevoStevo Upgrade in Progress

    Buy a Paleo Cafe franchise and start selling healthy food: http://paleo-cafe.com.au/


  • Thank you all for the advice. I'm not looking into buying a paleo cafe franchise.. I want it more to be a one on one coaching deal. I also don't really want to sell products, only services. Thank you though, this is really helpful :)


    It seems like first order of business is marketing the way I want to be seen by potential clients. So basically, kick ass at life first and then people will wonder how I do it. Collab with others who also kick ass, and spread it.


  • If you only care about helping people, then you might wanna consider landing a job with an existing paleo consultancy. If your skills arent client-ready, you could consider stalking the consultancy until they give you some assistant job. That way you get a foot in the door. As long as you keep studying on your own you should be able to become client-ready pretty fast. The hard part is getting the foot in.


     


    If you wanna get rich too, then the best way is to create a scalble product. Services are notoriously difficult to scale. Books scale, 1-1 skype consultations dont. But since you prefer the human connection and want to do 1-1 consultations you probably need to build a personal brand of sorts if you want to start your own business. At least if you wanna attract clients from the know.


     


    But you might be able to target fat people, just looking for a weight coach. They dont know what paleo is and dont care if youre not as well read as the old gurus because they dont even know they exist. And being able to help a fat person with no knowledge at all about food/paleo/bp is the same as helping a well read biohacker in this forum. Making people healthy and happy is your goal.


     


    So my guess would be to get an assistant job or try to target fat people at local gyms or something (maybe give a cut to the gym owner for any clients) or just write your ass off in this forum until people start believing youre a pro and want to pay you. Or learn internet marketing, start a blog and see if that works.


     


    Good luck!

  • Hi Keira!


     


    OK a few notes:


     


    1. Find a "hungry" niche and market to them.


     


    Don't try and re-invent the wheel and do something new (at first, anyway. You can do that later). Look for people who have businesses and websites that are already doing what you want to do or at least are doing something very similar.


     


    This way, you know there are people who are willing to pay for services that you are thinking of offering. And that is rule #1. Find a market of buyers for products and services that you are going to offer. If there are already people doing this and customers are buying from them, you won't be wasting your time creating or doing something that you're not sure if people are going to want or buy. Don't guess. KNOW. And don't ever go on "feelings." Find out beforehand if there's people willing to pay you before you start.


     


    Hence the term "hungry," you want to find those who really, really want what you have to offer.


     


    And the more competition, the better, as this is a sign there's a big "pool" or universe of people willing to press cash in your hand, so to speak, for what your business offers.  Again, make sure you find those who are offering something exactly the same or VERY close to what you plan to.


     


    2. Create a USP or Unique Selling Proposition.


     


    To separate yourself from the competition, what is about you or your products or services that makes you different or better than the others? This could be price (high or low, there's markets for elite coaching as well as those who want only affordable options), results-based, some guarantee you offer, speed, quality, customer service, and the list goes on...


     


    Of course, you can have more than one, but there should be one over-riding, "what sets me apart" appeal that makes customers want to choose you over the others. Sometimes, this can be a "small" thing, don't discount any ideas you may have in this regard, and other times it may be something more promiment like pricing, quality, etc.


     


    (Note on pricing. Don't always try to be the low price leader. It's a race to the bottom. Someone will almost always come along and try and beat you on price, then you lower yours, then another does the same, and everybody is seeing how fast you can get to the bottom. You can set and profit from a low price if you want to target those who need affordable prices, but set it and leave it. Compete on other aspects).


     


    3. If you don't have any credentials or major life accomplishements in your niche, then use the power of demonstration.


     


    Write about what you know, even if you're learning along the way, and let people read and see first hand what you'd be doing and how you'd be helping them. You can establish credibility this way. If I may, I'll use John Brisson, one of the posters on here, as an example. To my knowledge, he doesn't have any formal degree (yet, I think he's in college) but by writing about his knowledge and sharing it, he's come to be regarded as an expert. And he is, the man knows what he's talking about.


     


    Do the same. Use case studies if you need to. Write an example of how you would coach/heal/etc someone if they wanted to achieve "x" goal. Let your readers see how you would achieve something for someone. Then write another example for another goal or category or topic.


     


    Set up a blog/website. You can get this done for $5 on Fiverr.com or other related websites. Start sharing what you already know and what you learn. You don't need to tell them your new and still learning. Just share. Demonstrate what you know. There will be some who want to know more and out of those, some who may need/want coaching from you.


     


    4. You can monetize it with offers for your personal coaching and/or affiliate links to additional products or services that you recommend. You don't need to do anything else. They click the link, a certain percentage of those that click-through may buy, and you get a percentage of the sales. The companies you choose to promote handle all of the orders, fulfillment, shipping, customer service, etc.


     


    And you collect the checks/PayPal payments/however you choose to get paid. All for recommending them. Make sure it's quality stuff though, your readers won't stay with you long if you're pointing them to sorry items for the sake of a buck.


     


    And your main income may be from the coaching if you can build that up. So this gives you a couple of income sources.


     


    4. It's about traffic and conversion.


     


    "Traffic" is slang for visitors coming to your website. Or people walking in the door if it's a brick and mortar business. And conversion is what percentage of those visitors "convert" to customers, or what percentage buys something from you.


     


    So if you have 100 visitors to your site, and 3 of them clicked an affiliate link and went and bought something you recommended, that's a 3% conversion rate. These are metrics you need to keep track of.


     


    Traffic and conversion. Millions of visitors aren't worth anything (profit-wise) if you have zero percent conversion. And vice-versa, a high conversion rate isn't worth much if you're only getting a little bit of traffic.


     


    Traffic can be generated a huge number of ways. I prefer paid. As a general rule, you tend to get higher quality visitors. Not always, though. You can generate traffic through links on online forums like this, Facebook, Twitter, etc. Through search engines (ranking higher in them, and the like)


     


    Or you can pay for banner ads on blogs that have similar interests to what your site is about. You can do PPC (pay per click) with companies like Google, Yahoo/Bing, Facebook, etc.


     


    There's solo email ads or sponsorships, where you pay people who already have a large list of email names to send out an email on your behalf, or get "space" advertising in there, where your website links appears somewhere in the email. (in a sense, renting email "space" from them).


     


    And, of course, there's conversion.


     


    Entire books have been (and will be, I'm sure) written on each one of these.


     


    It's a big universe of knowledge with all of this stuff. There's tons and tons to know and use and benefit from.


     


    Don't make it too complicated though. Just start somewhere.


     


    Start a blog. Show what you know.


     


    Offer a service people pay you for.


     


    Do some things to get traffic.


     


    In every blog post, put a call to action.


     


    That's a statement that asks/compels the reader to take an action you want.


    (and throw in a benefit along with the "ask")


     


    "Sign up for my coaching and let me work with you one-on-one to lose at least 15 lbs of fat in the next 28 days" etc.


     


    Or


     


    "click here and discover what I used to rapidly (and safely) lower my cholesterol in just 4 weeks"


     


    You get the idea.


     


    All the best to you!

  • ClassicClassic
    edited June 2014

    If you wanna get rich too, then the best way is to create a scalble product. Services are notoriously difficult to scale. Books scale, 1-1 skype consultations dont. But since you prefer the human connection and want to do 1-1 consultations you probably need to build a personal brand of sorts if you want to start your own business. At least if you wanna attract clients from the know.

     


     


     


    Yes, exactly! 


     


    The question is do you want to trade for hours for dollars?


     


    Services will keep you there. And that's fine, if that's what you want. You can make a very good living charging a lot (as long as you're providing equivalent value) and stay booked up with clients.


     


    or you can offer something that you can sell over and over and over again to multitudes of people, be it ten thousands of people or ten million. This can be information products (think ebooks, etc) or physical products sold online.


     


    Or as mentioned earlier, go the affilate route. Let others handle all the selling, etc and you can send them traffic and get paid when the people you refer buy something. You can definitely scale this up as well.


  • John BrissonJohn Brisson The Legend Formerly Known as Ron Swanson ✭✭✭
    edited June 2014

    Its a hard life and trust me without money to back you up for marketing at the beginning it will be awhile before you can make a living at it.


     


    I've been doing it for two years, as something I can do to pass the time when I was taking care of my ill son, and help other people with the knowledge I had.


     


    I still technically can't make a living off of what I'm doing now, I dream that one day I will be able to. I'm not doing this to become rich, I just want to do what I love and support my family just like everyone else in this world.


     


    Its the people that I have helped, and will help in the future that keep me going.


     


    If you go into this thinking you will make money, its the wrong profession. If you go into it, just wanting to improve peoples lives, then its the right place.


    My book Fix Your Gut, is offered on Amazon for $9.99.

     

    I also offer coaching:  http://fixyourgut.com/health-coaching-information/

     

    Please join or like the Fix your Gut Facebook. Also please add me on twitter @FixYourGutJB.

     

    http://www.fixyourgut.com

     

  • I think people overrate this aspect but that is life and it is unavoidable.  Personally, I'd want to make sure that the person overcame something similar to what I'm going through and isn't just some salesman du jour.  Ergo - I would never take weight loss advice from somebody who has been healthy and skinny their entire life - I'm more likely to spit in their face.  I want them to have been a fat fuck for a long time so I know that they tried a lot of things before curing themselves.


     


    I'd actually be more inclined to take advice from somebody who is fat than somebody who has never been fat.


     


     




    The first thing I look at when I decide whether to accept someone as a health guru is whether they look healthy or not. As another example, I accept Dave as a cognition guru because he barely ever drops words or uses pause words. It comes very apparent when you match him up with an "average joe" in an interview (much like myself). I use pause words all the time.


    Get really, really good at walking the talk and people will naturally want to know what the hell you're doing.



  • StevoStevo Upgrade in Progress
  • edited July 2014

    Wow, this is all great stuff. Thank you everyone! You've given me a lot to think about.


     


    I think what the other person was saying is exactly what you mean, that they have overcome either weight loss or a disease/disorder of some kind through the same advice they give you and they now look and are healthier than they were before because of it, so it shows that they have merit. I personally have never been what most consider "fat", but I have had a gut my entire life. I looked at pictures of me as a child and as an adolescent and wow, my gut was quite round. It was *never* flat until now. It was clear that there was a problem with my gut health, and I also developed anxiety and depression, various other issues like "mysterious" stomach pains, bloating, acne, TMJ, pretty bad respiratory issues that have still been unexplained by doctors (this clears up when I'm eating well, and comes back any time I go outside of paleo/bulletproof, for instance if I were to eat something with sugar or too many of the wrong carbs). I lost all the weight I wanted to lose within 2 weeks of going paleo, I feel like everyone has a story like that. But more importantly in a situation like mine, ALL the other problems I had on a day-to-day basis also cleared up with paleo/bulletproof. It's not always weight loss stories alone that can appeal to clients, they could come to you with a myriad of health issues, even behavioral or sneaky ones that they would never connect to being caused by food. :)


     




    I think people overrate this aspect but that is life and it is unavoidable.  Personally, I'd want to make sure that the person overcame something similar to what I'm going through and isn't just some salesman du jour.  Ergo - I would never take weight loss advice from somebody who has been healthy and skinny their entire life - I'm more likely to spit in their face.  I want them to have been a fat fuck for a long time so I know that they tried a lot of things before curing themselves.


     


    I'd actually be more inclined to take advice from somebody who is fat than somebody who has never been fat.



  • Solid advice. I often try to lecture family members on the benefits of Paleo/BP, but they're not inclined to listen to my diet advice because I, myself, am not all that healthy.



    The first thing I look at when I decide whether to accept someone as a health guru is whether they look healthy or not. As another example, I accept Dave as a cognition guru because he barely ever drops words or uses pause words. It comes very apparent when you match him up with an "average joe" in an interview (much like myself). I use pause words all the time.


    Get really, really good at walking the talk and people will naturally want to know what the hell you're doing.

  • I think Rachael Ray started out by giving group cooking classes. 


  • Being a personal trainer probably won't make you rich but if you just want to help people and enjoy your job, I think this is a great way to go. 


     


    If I was in your position, I'd first test the waters by helping/coaching friends and people you already know. That way you'll see if you really like doing it or just having the fantasy of being a personal trainer. If that goes well, start charging money... most of the new clients for personal trainers are referral based anyway.


     


    I wish you good luck!


  • Why/how was 'regular' college wasting your time, how was it that you couldn't use it to help people? Go back to school, why not? 


     


    I bet someone with your career goals could get a lot of mileage out of a BA in business and a minor in biology. Or the other way around major in biology and minor business, take a couple of graphic design courses and programming to be capable of making your own website?


     


    I agree that a lot, if not everything could be learned online, but I think more realistically hands-on experience with an instructor in a classroom is crucial. 


    Make, [then,] thyself to grow to the same stature as the Greatness which transcends all measure; leap forth from every body; transcend all Time; become Eternity; and [thus] shalt thou know God. Conceiving nothing is impossible unto thyself, think thyself deathless and able to know all,—all arts, all sciences, the way of every life.  – Corpus Hermeticum XI “The Mind of Hermes”

  • Its a hard life and trust me without money to back you up for marketing at the beginning it will be awhile before you can make a living at it.

     

    I've been doing it for two years, as something I can do to pass the time when I was taking care of my ill son, and help other people with the knowledge I had.

     

    I still technically can't make a living off of what I'm doing now, I dream that one day I will be able to. I'm not doing this to become rich, I just want to do what I love and support my family just like everyone else in this world.

     

    Its the people that I have helped, and will help in the future that keep me going.

     

    If you go into this thinking you will make money, its the wrong profession. If you go into it, just wanting to improve peoples lives, then its the right place.




    Wow John, what a post!

    Freelance Wordpress developer and wannabe powerlifter
    carlaiau.com

     
  • @Bull I'm pretty sure hands on experience and classroom setting are usually mutually exclusive things.  Second most of the really good programming books can be had for free and the cost of tutor for the sticking points is 1% the cost of most college courses.  Also building a website is way easy, in most cities they've got free monthly meetups that'll get you up and running in an afternoon.  If its not your strength, it is better outsourced. 


     


     


    @ Keira


    Its much easier to write the book first and get the customer's later.  however without the customers how will you gauge the quality of your book.  Its a tricky catch 22. 


     


    Overall, as a career and thinking like a business person.  The paleo thing is probably a fad.  Albeit, a terribly effective one whose premise was an excellent starting point.  Tactically, You could probably make a living out of it for a few years.  However, you'd be constantly looking for the next big thing, because fads are like rockets and if they don't make it into space they come crashing down and you have to jump onto another rocket. 


     


    If I were to make some proscriptions, It would be to change your environment first and foremost.  The costs of being in a bad neighborhood are far reaching and subtle.  small things may be cheaper but the big things end up costing you tremendously in wealth and willpower.  Second, find the right people.  People you really, admire.  They do right by you 100% of the time.   You wanna be a paleo life coach, find THE BEST PALEO LIFE COACH ever and get with them, write them, bounce ideas off, and become credible in their eyes by inspiring them to do things a little different.  Seek their mentorship, or seek the people who mentored them, and keep the dialogue going.  Assume they're busy and its your responsibility to remind them.  Postitioning is 90% of the battle.  I went to the top school in the state for swimming.  I had never swam before.  Swimming wasn't a long term thing for me, it was just something fun to do.  However, by the end of that I was 5th in Florida for my race, in the top division.  Never would have happened if I went to any other school.  My sister went to the school next to mine.  It was a middle division school.  People half assed their work all the time.  Sis would train with me and was the Best in her team as a sophmore.  She was pretty good, by most standards but wrecked all her peers, just because her environment was different.  Train and work with Champions in your field. 


     


    In the meantime stack paper as high as you can and do not spend it on new shiny's.  It is much easier to be a capitalist, with capital.


     


    Like you said seek knowledge, but more than knowledge seek truth.  Test what you read and learn.  Knowledge is free, the truth always has a cost.   


     


    That's enough about that.  Its time for your customers.  You need to figure out who they really are.  Then design and cater your services and the scope of those services to them and their needs.  smaller scope generally is better starting out.   Really have a sit down and define it in real terms.  I'm going to show up where every day and do what exactly. 


     


    step 1 Kick ass at life


    step 2 ???


    step 3 profit


     


    step 2 is really like 30+ steps and it really helps to get a guide.


  • I love your attitude! And you're right, you can help people right now without wasting years and spending a fortune at college to do so!


     


    I wouldn't do it by yourself unless you had a mentor to help you. You could rationalise that mistakes help you learn but you're really less likely to impact people's lives for a long time that way. And that's what you're aiming for right? They say how much you earn is directly related to how much value you've created for other people.


     


    I watched a webinar where Cynthia Pasquella introduced people to her nutritional coaching course. The way she spoke about creating value for others, helping them with your knowledge right away and making money really resonated with me -- she had a great mindset about business as well as helping people and doing them together. You need both in any business. Bulletproof is built around those principles too.


     


    The course teaches you to start your own coaching business. They certify you with their nutritional course. They walk you through everything and work closely with you to develop your own personal area.


     


    I suggest emailing them and asking about their payment plans and scholarships. They were really open about this on the call. Chat to them and ask questions. Really dig in to what their students are achieving. Tell them you want to make sure the course is right for you and ask what qualities are causing some of their students to fail, and what qualities are causing some of their students to succeed. You'll get a lot asking these questions to any course and it'll give you a good understanding of the whole process :) 


     


    It's called Transformational Nutrition. And I have to stress again -- email these places! The same as you did by starting this thread :) They'll like it and you'll learn a lot.


  • Reading through all this has lead me to wanting to try something similar here in the UK. I'd love to create workout plans, meals and supplement regimes based on the Bulletproof model and help the majority of the public learn the most basic information for a healthy lifestyle that gets completely missed in all the schools/media. I had an idea to create a site containing workouts and nutritional tips for touring bands (I'm in one myself) but figured the demographic would be very small but could add this idea onto a broader choice of services. I don't have any qualifications in any field relating to this so would feel uneasy dictating something I have no actual background in but my own personal experiences, goals achieved and lessons learnt will hopefully strike a chord with possible clients.


  • Justin DJustin D Administrator Admin
    edited November 2014

    Coaching and consulting can be very lucrative. My highest per-hour earning from consulting has been $145/hour. Keep in mind, in the beginning you won't have 40 paid hours a week, and you often work an additional hour or two doing "R&D" for the client on top of the paid 1-hour face-to-face... this was typically the case for me from where I left off with my side-services. Also, you'll start a lot lower than that in the beginning...


     


    But, if you get established, it can be a great lifestyle. I know several life coaches (in various industries) that make $150 - $250/hour, for 30+ paid hours a week.


     


    The hard part is getting the momentum to start with.


     


    I would highly recommend any of the business courses, or even just the website, by Ramit Sethi (http://www.iwillteachyoutoberich.com).


     


    I've purchased several of his programs (Earn1K, Zero To Launch), and they really do work if you put in the time and do your homework.


     


    In Earn1K, he teaches you step-by-step how to launch a side business, using just ~5-15 hours a week, and achieving $1000/month after 6 months. His model is great for a service business like coaching/consulting. I followed his strategies and guides almost exactly, and sure enough, my ballroom dance instruction business was getting to ~$1000 month after 5 months... then Bulletproof called.


     


    He has a 'No bullshit' approach... he flat-out says everything that everyone else does wrong, from focusing excessively on marketing techniques, business cards, domain names, etc., and says it like it is. You DON'T have a business until you get THREE paying clients. But he teaches you how to get those three clients in 6 months, and after that, adding more clients, or raising rates, is EASY.


     


    If you want more feedback on his programs, I'm happy to give more. He's my goto business-advice guru. Every strategy and technique that he has recommended, that I actually implemented, worked EXACTLY as he said it would, with awesome results.


  • Thanks for that Justin. Would you say it's a good idea to get some level of health coaching diploma to aid in business interest? I can start a Level 3 online diploma course from Oxford University here in the uk for only 365GBP which is tremendously cheap. Should I even pursue this though? i'm sure most of the course will contradict what I've learnt from the BP diet. Maybe I should direct this attention to just the business side of things like you mentioned or could I benefit from doing both?



     


  • Just seeing if anyone else has started or currently runs their own health/life coach business since this was last looked at?


     


    I'm in the middle of the Health Coach diploma i spoke of above as i wanted to have some weight behind just saying i'm a health coach.


     


    My end plan is to not only do one on one coaching but break down the different areas into e-books and on-demand videos and let that sit as a passive income source. Any tips or advice in doing this?




  • Just seeing if anyone else has started or currently runs their own health/life coach business since this was last looked at?


     


    I'm in the middle of the Health Coach diploma i spoke of above as i wanted to have some weight behind just saying i'm a health coach.


     


    My end plan is to not only do one on one coaching but break down the different areas into e-books and on-demand videos and let that sit as a passive income source. Any tips or advice in doing this?




    Check out the Ben Greenfield podcast "how to become a health coach" It was linked earlier in the thread and  it addresses your questions above.

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