Building Muscle

I am going to be hypothetical (but clearly its about me), how would someone who is 40 go about retaining and perhaps even adding more bulk/muscle mass while on the bulletproof diet? What supplements would you add?


Stress and sleep are pretty locked in so I am happy with that. As is the heavy lifting, low cardio workouts which I follow.


I feel that having gone paleo and then bulletproof I have been losing a lot of weight and therefore muscle mass i.e. i look skinny rather than ripped


 


Thank you for any help


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  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited September 2014

    if it was me, i would add two things;


     


    1. a good quality Creatine powder (creapure seems like a good one & is used by a number of brands).


     


    2. a high intensity interval training (hiit) session once every 7 to 10 days. ramp your heart rate up to it's max during the intervals (get a chest strap heart monitor if you don't own one already). you can pick the hiit type, ie. if your are 'looking after' your knees, avoid sprints. just as long as you can get your heart up to its max within the interval (esp in the later intervals). & warm up first.


     


    edit: a bit more context to my points above. 


    point 1. was aimed towards the 'building muscle' supplement query.


     


    point 2. was not aimed towards the 'building muscle' query. more just for overall health for the rest of your life. tho a google will show that it does seem to boost hgh (hormone growth factor). & is a more anabolic than catabolic exercise, which is mentioned in an article here; All Bodybuilders Should Be Doing High Intensity Interval Training


    fake it till you make it



  • if it was me, i would add two things;


     


    1. a good quality Creatine powder (creapure seems like a good one & is used by a number of brands).


     


    2. a high intensity interval training (hiit) session once every 7 to 10 days. ramp your heart rate up to it's max during the intervals (get a chest strap heart monitor if you don't own one already). you can pick the hiit type, ie. if your are 'looking after' your knees, avoid sprints. just as long as you can get your heart up to its max within the interval (esp in the later intervals).





    If you're talking about body by science then you mean High intensity training.  Interval training is for sprints.  


    Body by science is an alright way to build some muscle but if you mean to acquire a substantial amount of muscle or to move a lot of weight you'll have to train for those things specifically.  I think body by science is good for overall well being and fitness but it's not going to make you a body builder or a powerlifter or even someone in between.  

  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited September 2014


    If you're talking about body by science then you mean High intensity training.  Interval training is for sprints.  




     


    Nope, not talking about body by science or hit. taking about hiit, which does not have to be sprints. tabata is a form of hiit. personally i use a standing bike. 


    fake it till you make it

  • DManDMan Master of Arts ✭✭✭

    I do a BBS workout and some extra hit on a bike...


    I recommend reading the book. And eat a bulletproof diet. BBS is meant to make the best out of your genes for all ages and genders.


     


    Here is a good overview.


    https://www.bulletproofexec.com/bulletproof-body/


    May you be well, may you be happy, may you be healthy, may you be loved.

    How much to eat:
    advanced | How to train: bulletproof training | HRV: HRV FOR TRAINING HRV BASICS What Affects HRV | Brain  & Memory dual n back training advanced training

     

     

  • Muscle building requires more carbs than once a week unless you are only working out once a week then it's ok. I like Mike Mentzer style High intensity workouts for breaks of around 12 weeks where you only workout every 96 hrs or longer between workouts on bulletproof diet. But for bulking I enjoy Jim Stoppani's Size and Strength and upping the carbs daily to 250 grams for me at 190 pounds, protein 200 grams and 125 grams of Fat. I ear bulletproof on bulking cycles but I add pre workout whey 25 gram and post workout 50 gram whey with 30 gram of dextrose(potatoe source not corn). However I am not a fan of whey or dextrose except phases where I try to add more muscle. I have learned nutrition is 10 times more important than any workout routine and sleep and relaxation are 10 times more important than nutrition and being happy with my body today is 10 times more important than anything.


  • Nope, not talking about body by science or hit. taking about hiit, which does not have to be sprints. tabata is a form of hiit. personally i use a standing bike. 





    But it's cardio centric training with sprint like exercises?  


    You're not going to build the much muscle with sprints alone.  


    You need to do hypertrophy training and eat lots of food.  

  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited September 2014


    But it's cardio centric training with sprint like exercises?  


    You're not going to build the much muscle with sprints alone.  


    You need to do hypertrophy training and eat lots of food.  




     


    I thought my mention of hiit without any context may confuse...i've edited my answer above to add the context.


    fake it till you make it

  • I take it you mean something like this:


    http://lifehacker.com/5989669/researchers-claim-to-discover-the-single-most-efficient-exercise-regimen


     


    Good news: It's a great workout, it scales up very well (ie, if you start out only able to max your speed at 12mph, and then months later are able to go full speed at 24mph, then it will still work efficiantly), is great for cardio-pulminary...


     


    Bad news: Like most cardio, you won't put on signifigant amounts of muscle from it.


     


    If you are interested in getting more muscle, then you have to do heavy lifting and lots of food. (Bodybuilders have what they call "GOMAD Protocal" Gallon Of Milk A Day.)


     


    That said, throwing a couple of HIIT days into your routine (I'd really be hesitent to put them on the same days as your weightlifting... give your muscles some time to recover!). Something like Day 1: Weightlifting, Day 2: HIIT, Day 3: light/rest; or something similar to that, would be the best.


  • edited September 2014

    Some recommendations for mass and strength training


     


    8 + 8 week program


     


    Protein


    1-5-2.0 g/kg bodyweight and day


     


    Post workout first 8 weeks


    30g Whey for lean strength gains


    30 whey + 60g carbs for mass and bulk


     


    Set and reps first 8 weeks


    3 set (basic double joint movements)


    8 reps 


     


    Post workout second 8 weeks


    30g Whey, 50g carbs, 5g creatine


     


     


    Set and reps second 8 weeks


    3-4 set (basic double joint movements)


    8-4 reps. Progressive. Start with whatever weight you can lift 8 reps during 3 sets. Then increase the weights every week (or the level of difficulty of you do calistenics). On the last week the weight should be so heavy you can only do 4 reps. 


     


    After 16 weeks you will be superstrong. Probably 30% stronger than today, depending on your initial strength. This progam has more focus on athletic strength (since that is my expertise) but for mass and bulk you might want to add about 2-4 reps on this setup and one more set as well. 


     


    You might do the same exercise 1-2 times a week. You have to feel if 2 times is too much. Total number of reps per week for each exercise normally can vary between 20-60. Below or over than you will probably have less gains. 


    Which Factors are Most Important for Strength Development? Find out on this episode with Black Belt Nutrition on Super Human Radio 

    The 5 Best & Worst Supplements - A free insider report from Black Belt Nutrition

    3 Steps to become a master Bio-Hacker - Part 1

     

  • I am over 40 and have gained over 15 lbs of muscle in recent years.  I did it by a split routine 4 times a week which is very intense and lifting heavy weight 8 times for all muscle groups.  I take carnitine, tsp creatine, 1tsp glutamine, 2tsp bcaa, 1 scoop nz whey 15 min before and ditto after.  I do this at the tail end of my intermittent fast and also have a cup of rice and my lunch.  My diet is very bulletproof.


    I can say that I had to try body weight exercise and in the 3 weeks I was doing them I lost about 10 lbs of muscle so I cannot recommend that...


  • edited September 2014

    In one month I dropped from 30% body fat to 27%.  I worked out twice a week - one session of HIIT and weights and the other was more weight focused.  I took Super Cissus and PAAG per Tim Ferriss's recommendations in 4 Hour Body.  I think one or both made a real difference.  I was really surprised.  I can see a difference.  I'm less flabby.  




  • You can't lift weights and hiit in the same day?, looks like you might need to work on that, maybe you might need to work on your nutrition and recovery regimens.




    That isn't what I said.


    You *can* do weights and HIIT on the same day. But it's generally a bad idea.


     


    Okay, real basic biomechanics here... there are two basic componants of what we think of when we think of muscle (there is actually more, but we are going simple here...) sarcoplasm and myofibril. Myofibril are your 'lifting heavy things' strength. Sarcoplasm is a sheath that your myofibrils float in, and are where your glycosis reactions happen... your endurance/areobic energy. (It's a little sloppier then that... you do some glycosis reactions for just about everything, and your myofibril are involved in any movement...)


    Mechanically, when you do any kind of intensive activity, you break down and rebuild your muscle fibers. If you lift lots of heavy things, your myofibril will be rebuilt again and again, bigger and more reinforced. If you do lots of nonstop jogging, you will break down your sarcoplasm for energy. With me so far?


    When you are exercising, it is important to give your body enough time to rebuild these tissues... either one. This is why bodybuilders either split sections of the body, or alternate days. By combining both, you are not only putting extra stress on your muscles, but you are requiring a massive rebuilding of both tissues. As I said in my origional post, I'd be really hesitant to put that kind of stress on your body unless you are in very specific conditions (ie, away at Olympics Training Camp or the like, where you are getting massive amounts of nutrition, hydration, medical supervision, and physical supervision to make sure you are overusing).


     


    Which brings me to rebuilding. When you are trying to put on muscle, especially, you need lots of raw materials... protiens, amino acids, fats, minerals, some vitamins... and lots and lots of calories. Unless you are very, very careful, you are going to be hard pressed to get enough to recover fully, which means that you will suffer hydrotropy... or the shrinking of muscles.


     


    In short, sure you *can* do both. Just like you *can* spend all day rock climbing. But the stress on your body you reach a tipping point.. will your body have enough raw materials to rebuild the myofibril or the sarcoplasm? And what if you are currently fighting off an infection (something we are doing almost constantly, even if we aren't getting sick from it.) or trying to overcome from sleep deficiancy or stress or learning? That's more demands on your limited resources.


     


    Fortuneatly, you can split the days up... stress the myofibril one day, then stress the sarcoplasm the next. Less demand... heck, you can even adapt your diet to the different days, with more electrolites and water on your areobic days, more protiens on your anareobic ones.

  • so in summary:


     


    StJason: "here's a bunch of interesting and useful info about ways that you can maximize your recovery from different types of workouts, and reasoning behind why it might make more sense to do different types of workouts on different days instead of going balls to the wall in every way possible in one day"


     


    Jason Miller: "yeah, well, i am super awesome and you are just ignorant". 


     


    that about right?


  • RekaReka ✭✭✭
    edited September 2014

    I don't agree with the "you need tons of calories to put on muscle" part... I gained muscle (and fat) while trying to cut, on average 1500 kcal per day, below 100 g carbs on most days, and I'm a woman. (Yeah with this result that sounds like a fucked up cutting diet, I know.) It's highly individual how much nutrition one needs to put on muscle. Just look at hardgainer guys eating 3000 kcal with 500 g carbs and shrinking away. No way to say as a general rule of thumb how much nutrients per bodyweight one needs because people will get different, even opposing results.


    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.



  • I don't agree with the "you need tons of calories to put on muscle" part... I gained muscle (and fat) while trying to cut, on average 1500 kcal per day, below 100 g carbs on most days, and I'm a woman. (Yeah with this result that sounds like a fucked up cutting diet, I know.) It's highly individual how much nutrition one needs to put on muscle. Just look at hardgainer guys eating 3000 kcal with 500 g carbs and shrinking away. No way to say as a general rule of thumb how much nutrients per bodyweight one needs because people will get different, even opposing results.




     


    This is true. Composition of diet is more important then amount. You need lots of protien to get muscle, and if you are just eating fats and carbs, you are going to have trouble.


    That said.. it's a heckuva lot easier to put on bulk with 3000 cals a day then 1500. The fact that Reka did is applaudable and underlines the whole biohacking concept... most result for least input. Good job.

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