Bulletproof Diet And Intermittent Fasting - My 1.5 Year Results

edited September 2014 in The Bulletproof Diet

Hi! I posted a thorough update detailing my progress/results with the Bulletproof Diet over the past year and a half - http://www.quantifiedbob.com/2014/09/bulletproof-diet-intermittent-fasting-1-5-year-results/

 

It's a rather long read, so here's a tl;dr version:


 


bloodwork-18months-1024x313.png


  • The Bulletproof diet has worked! (for me, at least). But it’s less of a “diet”, and more of a lifestyle.
  • To follow the diet long-term, some individual refinements need to be made (such as cutting back intermittent fasting, increasing carbs or adding a “refuel” day, or avoiding certain foods until pre-existing gut/autoimmune issues have been addressed).
  • Out of range markers such as high LDL cholesterol were not due to the diet – rather, the diet “exposed” other pre-existing issues such as under active thyroid and adrenals, gut issues, and chronic infections. 

If you are interested in learning more about uncovering gut, thyroid, and autoimmune issues, you might want to check out the full-length version :)

 

Feel free to ask any questions, and any feedback/comments are much appreciated!


Comments

  • Fascinating. I'm impressed by your ability to stick with it for that long and to chart your progress in such a detailed way. Thank you for sharing!


  • Awesome article!  I'm really interested in the gut test.  Was this something ordered through Just in Health? When in the process did you get it checked?  Are you planning to test it again soon?


    "faber est suae quisque fortunae"

     

    @IanSzalinski @EvokeFoods



  • Awesome article!  I'm really interested in the gut test.  Was this something ordered through Just in Health? When in the process did you get it checked?  Are you planning to test it again soon?




     


    Yes, your doctor can obtain the GI Effects test kit from Genova Diagnostics (formerly Metametrix) and have it sent to you (or in my case, my doctor has the kits already). You collect your samples at home, complete a form with your payment/insurance info, and return everything in a provided FedEx envelope. You then get your results in about a week.


     


    In my case, I waited several months before doing the tests, mainly because there was no indication of gut issues until after we got the results from my first round of bloodwork and were trying to figure out why some of my numbers were out of optimal range.


     


    I had also submitted a sample to uBiome last fall, but just recently found out they were never to process the sample :(

  • That is some great info. The correlation of H. Pylori/infections and imflammation is interesting.


  • I'm sure this has been answered on the forum before, but.. How did you get this testing done and how much did it roughly cost?


  • Thanks for linking to the full post, it was an excellent read. It seems like a major factor in your success was finding a functional medicine doc, or perhaps an especially good one. Is that characterization correct?


     


    If yes, would you recommend that to someone who is in reasonably good health? I've been toying with the idea of going in and just sort of saying "optimize me" and having someone else look at my data. Good investment? How hard was it to find the right functional medicine doc? 




  • Thanks for linking to the full post, it was an excellent read. It seems like a major factor in your success was finding a functional medicine doc, or perhaps an especially good one. Is that characterization correct?


     


    If yes, would you recommend that to someone who is in reasonably good health? I've been toying with the idea of going in and just sort of saying "optimize me" and having someone else look at my data. Good investment? How hard was it to find the right functional medicine doc? 




     


    I too always felt I was in "reasonably good health", as I never get sick. Because I never showed any outward symptoms, I had no reason to think otherwise. Having a good doctor is key - when you do a round of bloodwork and see something like your LDL going up 100+ points after switching to the BP diet, most doctors will freak!


     


    Finding the right functional doctor took a bit of work, as I had gone through several doctors over the past few years, starting with more traditional ones, then moving to a local functional medicine doctor who wasn't familiar enough with a BP/paleo-type diet/lifestyle, to finally one who follows a similar BP practices who had treated others with similar issues. We work together remotely, as we are in different parts of the country but we connect face-to-face a few times a year (i.e., I'll see him this weekend at the Bulletproof Conference).


     


    Also, not all doctors are data scientists - they are good at interpreting, say, your blood work but they aren't going to correlate those values with other datapoints in your life that you might be tracking - sleep quality, exercise, stress, etc. I think you need to work with both a good functional medicine doctor as well as a "quantified coach" who can sift through your data and sit alongside your doctor.  MyMee is the first company I can think of that provides this type of service.



  • I'm sure this has been answered on the forum before, but.. How did you get this testing done and how much did it roughly cost?




     


    Your doctor will order up the tests and you schedule an appointment with a local lab, such as LabCorp. Saliva and stool samples can be collected from the comfort of your home, then FedExed out.


     


    Periodic blood tests shoudn't cost much, if anything, especially if you have insurance. However, my tests have been rather comprehensive and frequent, and if you go by "list price", it adds up to thousands of dollars - however, the labs negotiate discounts with insurance providers, so a $3500 bill ends up costing out-of-pocket probably a tenth of the amount (assuming you have a good insurance plan). Otherwise, your doctor should have the ability to negotiate their own "cash" rates with labs (meaning you wouldn't submit to insurance but simply pay it all out-of-pocket) - many times, this will cost less than having your insurance company process it!

  • Thanks. I'm going to have to look into getting this done. Props to you for doing this and posting it as well.. Rest of website looks informational as well

  • We're all out of like votes for the day but you got ours. Very informative and documented. Excellent stuff.


    What additional supplements (if any) did you take?



  • We're all out of like votes for the day but you got ours. Very informative and documented. Excellent stuff.


    What additional supplements (if any) did you take?




     


    My main supplements have been:


     


    Vitamin C 


    Vitamin D (more in winter, less in summer)


    Desiccated Liver


    Collagen and Whey Protein


    Glutathione (2-3x/week, more if I travel)


    Cod Liver Oil (2-3x/week)


     


    But I've also used/tried many others less frequently (nootropics, activated charcoal, etc.)


     


    In my post I outlined the numerous herbal remedies I've been taking to address the various autoimmune/thyroid issues. Over time I will continue cyclin off of them.


     


    I used to take a lot more supplements, but I've been trying to get as many nutrients as possible from my food. As I continue getting bloodwork done and seeing where I'm "dialed in" on various markers I can continue to reduce what I'm taking.

  • NickatNickat
    edited September 2014

    ^^^ You make some really good points and observations in your post: http://www.quantifiedbob.com/2014/09/bulletproof-diet-intermittent-fasting-1-5-year-results/


     


    The one statement that resonates most with us is:  '' I really hate it when something is labelled as a “diet”, because people’s first reaction is that it’s all about losing weight when in fact it’s more of a lifestyle.''


     


    Congratulations on your lifestyle choice Bob. It really shows.


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