Does Bone Broth Have Glutamate?

Have started to drink bone broth but recently read that it had a  lot of glutamate  in it. This concerns me. Am wondering what people think? 


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  • DManDMan Master of Arts ✭✭✭

    Would be interested in the source since I have bonebroth too...


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  • I would also like to know if bone broth has glutamate.


    Here is a recipe for egg drop soup using organic chicken bone broth. I used coconut aminos instead of soy sauce, added a Vit extra sesame oil, and didn't add onion. Tasted great. Next time I think I will add a little sliced green onion.


    http://www.foodrenegade.com/egg-drop-soup/
  • From what I've read it's about your personal sensitivity to it. --  Me, I had bone broth once.... let it stew for almost 24 hours with grass fed bones, skimmed out the fat, and had the absolute worst histamine response I've ever had to any food. -- I literally thought I had the insta-flu.


     


    Good way to hedge your bets is to just go with Dave's Collagen!


  • Correct me if I'm wrong, but bone broth contains amino acids and peptides from the collagen that is found in the bone and cartilage matrix. Collagen is somewhat similar i composition to gelatin, if not practically the same, at least in terms of amino acid compositions. Collagen and gelatin contain glutamic acid, not glutamine...and glutamic acid is the precursor to glutamate. So Dave's collagen doesn't seem to be better if the goal is to avoid glutamic acid. If, of course, glutamic acid from real food is an issue anyway. 


     


    Source: http://www.gelatin.co.za/gltn1.html 


  • So this is depressing. If I have elevated glutamate levels, this would suggest that I should stay away from Dave's collagen as well, am I correct? Does glutamic acid from food correlate with glutamate levels and neuroexcitotoxicity? 




  • Correct me if I'm wrong, but bone broth contains amino acids and peptides from the collagen that is found in the bone and cartilage matrix. Collagen is somewhat similar i composition to gelatin, if not practically the same, at least in terms of amino acid compositions. Collagen and gelatin contain glutamic acid, not glutamine...and glutamic acid is the precursor to glutamate. So Dave's collagen doesn't seem to be better if the goal is to avoid glutamic acid. If, of course, glutamic acid from real food is an issue anyway. 


     


    Source: http://www.gelatin.co.za/gltn1.html 




     


    First, glutamate and glutamic acid is the same thing. In neutral or basic pH it is glutamate and in acidic conditions (pH<5) it is glutamic acid. 


     


    Second, ther is no glutamine in gelatine because it is hydrolysed to glutamic acid in the analysis. The same for all proteins. Look at your whey, there should be all 20 aminos in it. But you only find 18. This is due to the fact that only glutamic acids is reported, not glutamine since it converts to glutamic acid in the analysis (the same is true for aspargine and aspartic acid). There are glutamine and glutamic acid in virtually all proteins but you will not find the rations on the label since it is difficult to analyse (cost to much for a food or supplement product). 


     


    When you ingest hole proteins with 20+ amino acids there is generally no problems with any of the amino acids. It's when you take one or a few of them that the unbalanced ratios might be problematic. This is true for most amino acids. 

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  • Star ChaserStar Chaser Powered by Shred
    edited October 2014
    Are you making it yourself? The problem occurs when you cook it at too high of a temperature. If you cook it at barely a simmer you should be fine

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  • First, glutamate and glutamic acid is the same thing. In neutral or basic pH it is glutamate and in acidic conditions (pH<5) it is glutamic acid. 


     


    Second, ther is no glutamine in gelatine because it is hydrolysed to glutamic acid in the analysis. The same for all proteins. Look at your whey, there should be all 20 aminos in it. But you only find 18. This is due to the fact that only glutamic acids is reported, not glutamine since it converts to glutamic acid in the analysis (the same is true for aspargine and aspartic acid). There are glutamine and glutamic acid in virtually all proteins but you will not find the rations on the label since it is difficult to analyse (cost to much for a food or supplement product). 


     


    When you ingest hole proteins with 20+ amino acids there is generally no problems with any of the amino acids. It's when you take one or a few of them that the unbalanced ratios might be problematic. This is true for most amino acids. 




     


    I appreciate the clarification. Thanks!

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