Light Hacking - A Complete Guide 2.0

Stefan fGStefan fG
edited November 2014 in General Discussion

HOW TO USE THIS THREAD:



Hi, I am right now in the process of researching and bulletproofing my home: regarding everything light and sleep... (and collagen formation, rejuvination, mitochondria, cyrcadian rythm, winder blues, energy, tissue healing, muscle pain relief, relaxation... you name it)


 


Since names, frequencies, ideas, products, concepts and knowledge have been thrown around losely in the various BP podcasts, forum posts, threads, youtube videos, all around the internet and on marketing sites of various companies .... - I wanted to - and am in the process of..getting order into the chaos for myself and creating a big-picture-frame that makes sense of all the given information and sciene that is out there; and will at the end provide a pragmatic frame of mind and blueprint on how to go about light hacking for optimal performance in your own home.


 


Since my knowledge is not "complete" at this point I wan't this thread to be HALF GUIDE (for total newbies) and HALF: my questions//your/our answers // a work in progress.


This can be difficult - hence, I appreciate your help. (Please shamelessely correct me on anything, provide sources, add content and knowledge.)


 


 


LIGHT what (we) I know



Living in nature makes this thread obsolete. Getting sunshine everyday and living in a hut without artificial lighting and not having and indoor job makes this thread obsolete. Meaning: Everything we scientifically found out and preach about light in a biohacking sense is backengineered from the sun and its full spectrum and the effects the different wavelenghts of this full spectrum have on the human physiology.


What is light? Light is a particle and a wave(length) at the same time. "Light" is the (tiny) range of frequencies / wavelenths the human eye is able to decode / "see" out of all the wavelengthes that we know of and that the sun emits / exist in the universe.


Illustrated here: http://www.pion.cz/_sites/pion/upload/images/a14cf10a5583d19f7cfdebd63cf64382_electromagnetic-spectrum.png



 


 


FUNCTION of light



In short ;)..The sun emits energy in form of photons. Photons are waves and particles at the same time. (http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=photons) Photons hit seaweed... [evolution..] ... Green plants emerge. Photons hit Chlorophyl ->Photosynthesis happens (http://sactree.com/assets/images/photosynthesis.jpg) Oxygen is produced, life becomes possible.


 


Hormones:


-Production of Vitamin D in your skin.


 



 


Evolution seems to have outsourced the energy hungy but majorly important process for our cell physiology of the vitamin D production to the energy of the sun and its collision with our skin since it (evolution) thought we're out in the sun anyways all the time. Then western modern civilization came and that did not work anymore. You should supplement.


Vitamin D is produced by the invisible fraction of the full spectrum, called UV-B. (UV = Ultraviolet, a wavelength between 10 and 400nm)


 


-Regulation of the cyrcadian rythm / (day and night rythm)


The presence of sunlight/certain wavelength ranges within the full spectrum trigger your body to wake up, excrete/spike cortisol, become energetic and stop the prodcution of melatonin.


The decreasing presence of sunlight and then the absence of sunlight causes you to start the production of melatonin, a powerful antioxidant, and makes you sleepy and wind down for the night and a restful and good night of deep sleep.


 


 


-Other cool stuff:


Healing with light and/or lasers.


Infrared lamps for healing muscle pain.


Cold red light for collagen formation.


Blue light as an anti fungal.


Blue light as an NO-releasing agent in tissue for more blood flow and healing.



 


 


THE PROBLEM



The main problem, and hence the reason for biohacking light, is simply put, that we spend way too little time in natural sunlight given our northern western hemisphere lifestyle.


Other problems arise through


-BAD lighting in buildings that are far from optimal for performance and concentration i.e. flickering fluorescent lights


 


"the wrong light at the wrong time" or "Melatonin seems to be pretty damn important functioning as your inner clock its disturbance is linked to illness, i.e. cancer"


This problem can be divided into two sub problems:


1. Not enough of the right / necessary wavelenth at the wrong time


 


This refers mainly to the lack of full spectrum, and most importantly as it seems blue light, in the morning / throughout the day and therefore in too much melatonin throughout the day and can and does result in "winter blues", a lack of energy, or insomnia, through the disturbance of the rythm the sunrise-sunset-circle would naturally dictate.


 


2. Too much of the right light at the wrong time:


This refers mainly to light that is too bright and has too much of the "energizing" wavelength, again especially blue light, at the WRONG time... i.e. nighttime, before you go to bed, or even when you switch on the light to urinate at night or when there are artificial lightsources in your bedroom or shine into it.


Again, the player is melatonin:


http://ceri.com/j27mel-1.gif


Blue light interferes with the production of melatonin, which is a hormon produced in your pineal gland


http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-mpmudzHHjrk/TsFfSiYx6EI/AAAAAAAADcI/N0rqWSuS-uU/s1600/the%2Bpineal%2Bgland%2Band%2Bthe%2Bthird%2B3%2Beye%2Bet%2Bon%2Bearth.jpg


and can be seen as the tact giver of your inner clock.


 


 


THE SOLUTION or BIOHACKING LIGHT



first,... there always is the lowhanging fruit:


The simple name of the game therefore is: Regulate and control your environment in a way so that you come as close as possible to emulating the natural cycle of the sun. In short: As long as you are inside throughout the day and in the evening, you want to try to expose your body to the same wavelengthes of visible light that the sun naturally would provide you with, given you were outside in order to increase sleep quality, better mood, prompt regeneration and have deep uninterrupted sleep.


 


 


KNOWLEDGE or WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW making sense of "spectrum" and different available lighting options



Okay,..


visible light is the range between 400nm (violet) and 700nm (red), again: http://www.pion.cz/_sites/pion/upload/images/a14cf10a5583d19f7cfdebd63cf64382_electromagnetic-spectrum.png


 


Now the mission is to get as close to natural sunlight as possible during the day... and to protect us from melatoin-production-disrupting blue light in the evening or at night when it is time for sleep.


 


The lighting options are incandescent (banned!), LEDs, Halogens, Fluorescent lamps and full spectrum lights.


 


In regard to the spectrum, not all light is created equally. Here is a great graphic that shows what lighting options give off what kind of light:


spectral_responses2.png



The melatonin disrupting part light is all light up to 510nm. Since even the tiniest amount of exposure can dis or interrupt melatonin production you want to avoid all standard artificial light like the pest at night.


 


 


 


TOOLS


 


Blue light in the morning:



The infamous Phillips GoLite blue http://www.amazon.com/Philips-Golite-Energy-Rechargeable-Light/dp/B00M3SGD4Y/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1414012105&sr=8-8&keywords=phillips+go+lite+blue


This is supposed to "set" your cyrcadian rythm, energize you and help with insomnia.


You are supposed to have it next to you for 5-10minutes in the morning.


 


It will usually be BELOW your eyes when used as recommended.


Now if you are really picky it MIGHT make a difference from where it shines into your eyes since in nature, the blue sky is above us. I personally really like the feeling it gives you in the morning and I try to put it above me on my mirror in my bathroom to get blue light from where it is "meant to come from".


 


 


Daylight lamps for better mood and often recommended against depression (+excercise) and seasonal affective disorder



Now, - I am not sure about it - but I think I have read that the therapeutical measurable effect, at the end,... 'mereley' comes from the blue light within the spectrum these lamps emit. So it might be that it might not really matter if you go with one of these or with pure blue light.


 


http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_1_9?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=day%20light%20therapy%20lamp&sprefix=day+light%2Caps%2C294



 


 


Standard Lighting in your home or Lighting During The Day



I am right now in the process of installing two 58 W T8 True-Light Fluorescent Light Bulbs in my appartment which is 35q² or ~360 square feet, and was advised to do so by a light specialist.


 


These are more and more used in hospitals, for therapeutic reasons, in medical practices, schools, kindergartens, private homes, etc.!


 


http://naturlicht.de/leuchtmittel/leuchtstoffroehren/58-w-true-light-leuchtstoffroehre.php


 


The name of the game here is: Full Spectrum light bulbs/fluorescent light bulbs.


 


Benefits:


-Better seing, more contrast


-Truer colors


-More focus


-Better concentration


-More alert


-better mood


-UV-A and UV-B exposure for Vitamin D/mood/blood flow


 


For the european market:


http://www.true-light.eu/ENG/


 


and the closest to resmble this in the US seems to be:


 


http://products.mercola.com/light-bulbs/


or


http://www.naturallighting.com/cart/store.php?sc_page=48


 


This kind of light closely resembles the spectrum of the sun at around noon and therefore does contain UV-A and UV-B which is desirable.


 


This kind of light should be on in the morning or during the day. It is not "comfortable" or "cosy" so you should have more reddish light in the evening to wind down and get ready for sleep



 


 


Blue Blocking Glasses or What the heck is Dave wearing?



So, what is all the buzz with Daves orange glasses? Are they blue blocking glasses? Why would I want to consider a pair of blue blocking glasses and which ones to get?


 


1. Daves infamous orange glasses are Irlen custom made glasses:


http://ilovebuttercoffee.com/dave-asprey-orange-glasses/


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XzEzB7eOO_k


and therefore not specifically designed for pure blue light blocking.


 


But why even consider blue-light-blocking-glasses? The idea behind blue blocking glasses is to block out the wavelength that appear "blue" for the human eye, since as we now know, blue light is not just blue but will also inhibit your pineal gland from producing melatonin, the powerful antioxidant that makes you sleepy and promotes healthy, rejuvinating sleep.


 


Usage is simple: The idea is to wear them 1-2 hours before you plan to go to bed.


 


Recommended by Dave and very cheap:


http://www.amazon.com/Uvex-S1933X-Eyewear-SCT-Orange-Anti-Fog/dp/B000USRG90/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1415127948&sr=8-2&keywords=blue+blocking+glasses


 


Much more expensive (and I am still trying to figure out why)


https://www.lowbluelights.com/products.asp?PageIndex=6


Glasses from lowbluelights.com, an entire company solving the problem of blue light.


 


You might also have heard of Gunnars (http://www.gunnars.com/)


According to an eMail they have sent me, the amber version of their glasses blocks about 65% of all blue light.


Therfore it is important to note that these glasses are NOT specifically for blocking blue light.


These are glasses for heavy-screen-users. I personally rock a pair of the Intercept Smoke for when I am spending a large amount of time in front of a screen, like right now.


These glasses are designed for making it easier for your eyes since the light emitted by most screens can have negative effects on you. (learn more here: http://www.gunnars.com/how-they-work/



 


 


Lighting At Night




Subsequently, if it is a good idea to block blue light via glasses 1-2 hours before you want to go to bed, - it probably also is a good idea to not be exposed to blue light during the night (in case nature calls for example)..

 


Already introduced, https://www.lowbluelights.com/about.asp, an entire company dedicated to optimal lighting at night in order to not disrupt melatonin production. (Backed up by science)


 


Dave sells their night light:


https://www.bulletproof.com/low-blue-nightlight


 


So it is probably a good idea to either use either these lights, blue blocking glasses, or orange tinted light bulbs for when you plan to stay up late/read before bed/want to wind down for the night or have to get up at night to pee.



 


 


Hack Your Screen



This one is easy.


Simply get: https://justgetflux.com/


A program designed to color your screen and block out harsh blue light, according to your position on earth and the natural cycle of the sun.


If jailbroken, also available for iPhone etc. as far as I know.



 


Things I plan to cover are:


 


-Collagen formation light


-mitochondria production enhancing light


-infrared light


Comments

  • DManDMan Master of Arts ✭✭✭

    would be great if you could discuss light colors and mood during daytime. as well. More in detail. Not just blue and red....there are some studies for that. I know that from uni but I forgot most of it.


    May you be well, may you be happy, may you be healthy, may you be loved.

    How much to eat:
    advanced | How to train: bulletproof training | HRV: HRV FOR TRAINING HRV BASICS What Affects HRV | Brain  & Memory dual n back training advanced training

     

     

  • Interesting compilation of info here. Thanks! Indoor lighting is a huge interest of mine right now, and when I move I plan on having some amazing lighting in my room. I vaguely remember a study where the nadir for melatonin suppression was 463nm, and as you pointed out, it can continue onward up till a little after 500nm. So, there are people like Jack Kruse who recommend darkness at night, even going as far as sitting around in complete darkness and just using orange or red colored flashlights for reading... but I don't think that's necessary at all. In fact, I think one can use appropriate lighting - largely red, infrared, orange, etc - all day up until bedtime, then sleep in darkness.


     


    See: Red Light Increases Alertness During "Post-Lunch Dip" (note that there wasn't melatonin suppression, despite increased alertness)


     



    Effects of Exposure to Intermittent versus Continuous Red Light on Human Circadian Rhythms, Melatonin Suppression, and Pupillary Constriction (this study shows that exposure to continuous red light didn't reduce melatonin levels, though in 2 participants it caused circadian phase shifts, which I suspect was a good thing considering the participants were sleep deprived; also, the light was essentially shone directly at their face and eyes, which no one would be doing at home, thus it'd probably have even less of an effect on sleep/melatonin in our homes when the light is many feet away/above our heads/etc)

     



    The Effects of Red and Blue Lights on Circadian Variations in Cortisol, Alpha Amylase, and Melatonin (again, shows red light doesn't suppress melatonin)

    There is also a study on basketball players where 30 minutes of full body exposure to red light in the late evening increased melatonin levels, improved sleep, and enhanced their overall performance when compared to a control.


     


    Dr. Peat often recommends 130 volt, clear incandescent bulbs, but ran at 110-120 volts to maximize the red light spectrum, and minimize the blue, and to use them all day up until sleep. One of the more knowledgeable members of a forum actually tested a variety of sources of light using a spectrometer and some other tech to analyze the wavelengths of light, and found that Dr. Peat's recommendation was actually sound (he did this after reading an article in a Russian newspaper about researchers using 130 volt incandescent bulbs ran at 110-120 volts in patients' homes all day to enhance recovery after anesthesia and surgery). So, I think with some hacking and tracking, one could take advantage of indoor light for improved cognition all day/night, without decreasing endogenous melatonin production (or potentially increasing it).


     


    I was wondering, as opposed to using a spectrometer, couldn't we use a diffraction grating to assess the colors being emitted by a light source?


    http://equilibriohm.wordpress.com/

    http://biohacksblog.com/

    Natural ability without education has more often raised a man to glory and virtue than education without natural ability. - Marcus Aurelius 

  • Interesting this thread came up.  I just went on the forum to ask about a red lighting device that Ben greenfield uses at night before sleep to enhance mitochondrial function, etc. So I was delighted to find this thread. 


     


    This is the link to the red light that Ben uses -http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002MGVPHM/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B002MGVPHM&linkCode=as2&tag=bengree-20


     


    I would love people's thoughts about it. I had assumed red/near infrared was the most effective for  penetrating the deepest, yet Ben's device doesn't' look like it is one of those. It looks lieka  regular bulb, but not sure...There are no real specifications, which makes me nervous.


     


    I'm wondering what people would recommend in terms of the best lighting for overall healing (not wound healing) and mitochondrial function. 


     


    Also am wondering what the best color light is to promote relaxation during the day when one is stressed and unable;e to physically relax. 




  •  


    Dr. Peat often recommends 130 volt, clear incandescent bulbs, but ran at 110-120 volts to maximize the red light spectrum, and minimize the blue, and to use them all day up until sleep. One of the more knowledgeable members of a forum actually tested a variety of sources of light using a spectrometer and some other tech to analyze the wavelengths of light, and found that Dr. Peat's recommendation was actually sound (he did this after reading an article in a Russian newspaper about researchers using 130 volt incandescent bulbs ran at 110-120 volts in patients' homes all day to enhance recovery after anesthesia and surgery). So, I think with some hacking and tracking, one could take advantage of indoor light for improved cognition all day/night, without decreasing endogenous melatonin production (or potentially increasing it).


     


    I was wondering, as opposed to using a spectrometer, couldn't we use a diffraction grating to assess the colors being emitted by a light




    I keep hearing "full spectrum lights" for indoor lighting. What should i be looking for if i want to buy some bulbs for daytime use in the home? 130v clear incandesent that seems pretty easy to get a hold of and cheap but is that the best option? Should i not diffuse the light through lamp shades or light fixture covers?

  • Hey, it's been a while. It is, to say the least, pretty overwhelming to cut through the BS out there and find solid information and good products.


    I'll try my best to answer your questions/help you further on your way..




    would be great if you could discuss light colors and mood during daytime. as well. More in detail. Not just blue and red....there are some studies for that. I know that from uni but I forgot most of it.




    Well, in my opinion this, again, is a back to basics... or back to nature question. You will be in the best possible mood during daytime in light, that most closely resembles the full spectrum of the sun  AND also probably has light in the non-visible wavelength fraction -> which would be UV-A and UV-B. (OR obviously if you directly are in natural sunlight)


    Important to notice here is that your modd probably is not entirely just influenced by the visible part of light but also by the many (and probably more than we yet know of) HORMONAL changes that are initiated by UV-A/UV-B.


    More on my findings for this kind of light on the bottom of this thread! (and in version 2.0 of this guide, which is still to come)


     




    Interesting compilation of info here. Thanks! Indoor lighting is a huge interest of mine right now, and when I move I plan on having some amazing lighting in my room. I vaguely remember a study where the nadir for melatonin suppression was 463nm, and as you pointed out, it can continue onward up till a little after 500nm. So, there are people like Jack Kruse who recommend darkness at night, even going as far as sitting around in complete darkness and just using orange or red colored flashlights for reading... but I don't think that's necessary at all. In fact, I think one can use appropriate lighting - largely red, infrared, orange, etc - all day up until bedtime, then sleep in darkness.


     


    See: Red Light Increases Alertness During "Post-Lunch Dip" (note that there wasn't melatonin suppression, despite increased alertness)


     


    Effects of Exposure to Intermittent versus Continuous Red Light on Human Circadian Rhythms, Melatonin Suppression, and Pupillary Constriction (this study shows that exposure to continuous red light didn't reduce melatonin levels, though in 2 participants it caused circadian phase shifts, which I suspect was a good thing considering the participants were sleep deprived; also, the light was essentially shone directly at their face and eyes, which no one would be doing at home, thus it'd probably have even less of an effect on sleep/melatonin in our homes when the light is many feet away/above our heads/etc)

     


    The Effects of Red and Blue Lights on Circadian Variations in Cortisol, Alpha Amylase, and Melatonin (again, shows red light doesn't suppress melatonin)

    There is also a study on basketball players where 30 minutes of full body exposure to red light in the late evening increased melatonin levels, improved sleep, and enhanced their overall performance when compared to a control.


     


    Dr. Peat often recommends 130 volt, clear incandescent bulbs, but ran at 110-120 volts to maximize the red light spectrum, and minimize the blue, and to use them all day up until sleep. One of the more knowledgeable members of a forum actually tested a variety of sources of light using a spectrometer and some other tech to analyze the wavelengths of light, and found that Dr. Peat's recommendation was actually sound (he did this after reading an article in a Russian newspaper about researchers using 130 volt incandescent bulbs ran at 110-120 volts in patients' homes all day to enhance recovery after anesthesia and surgery). So, I think with some hacking and tracking, one could take advantage of indoor light for improved cognition all day/night, without decreasing endogenous melatonin production (or potentially increasing it).


     


    I was wondering, as opposed to using a spectrometer, couldn't we use a diffraction grating to assess the colors being emitted by a light source?




    To your first part:


    This probably totally depends on your circumstances and for example WHEN you are going to bed.


    This is your natural melatonin production timing in "nature":


    j27mel-1.gif


     


    Now, it is important to understand that the science is pretty clear: Blue light, even small doses,... WILL disturb melatonin production and this is researched to play a role in chronic diseases, cancer, "and stuff".


    So Jack Kruse or whoever has a valid point, especially if you are planning to stay up late. It totally depends on your definition of what you mean by "at night".


     


    You say "but I don't think that's necessary at all. In fact, I think one can use appropriate lighting - largely red, infrared, orange, etc - all day up until bedtime, then sleep in darkness."


    I say: One SHOULD use appropriate lighting all day. BUT appropriate lighting is not red/infrared/orange like and incandescent light bulb:


    incandescent_spectrum_graph.jpg


     


    But should resemble daylight, which is:


    img3-C43H22.png


     


    What you, I guess, confuse is the notion of "just using a flashlight" / or complete darkness and "appropriate lighting" in the sense of "a little" or "a lot".


    IF you can find reddish "appropriate/a lot" light WITHOUT any blue wavelength: go ahead - but you won't. Hence, the recommendation of for example: Jack Kruse.


     


    You say "The Effects of Red and Blue Lights on Circadian Variations in Cortisol, Alpha Amylase, and Melatonin (again, shows red light doesn't suppress melatonin)"


    I say: You use the word "again" - as if opposing me... that doesnt make sense in that context because red light doesn't suppress melatonin... blue light does. BUT in "normal" light that "appears" red(ish), there will always be parts that are STILL BLUE and will suppress melatonin production (AT NIGHT... which is the only time you should care about this)


     


    Regarding your last part and Dr. Peat - I think that would be devestating. DURING THE DAY you should NOT limit blue light!!! You should OPTIMALLY have pure sunlight all day, and if that doesnt work, like for most western hemisphere people, you should get light, again, that is closest to natural daylight and hence, has a lot of blue in it.


    During the day you WANT to suppress melatonin in order to feel energized and awake.


     


    In this discussion "Volt" doesn't really matter that much. It is more about Kelvin, Lumen, the Spectrum and the resemblance of light to the sun.


    There is a way to make the spectrum visible as you suggested:


    http://www.viva-lite.co.uk/spectral-glasses.html


     




    Interesting this thread came up.  I just went on the forum to ask about a red lighting device that Ben greenfield uses at night before sleep to enhance mitochondrial function, etc. So I was delighted to find this thread. 


     


    This is the link to the red light that Ben uses -http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002MGVPHM/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B002MGVPHM&linkCode=as2&tag=bengree-20


     


    I would love people's thoughts about it. I had assumed red/near infrared was the most effective for  penetrating the deepest, yet Ben's device doesn't' look like it is one of those. It looks lieka  regular bulb, but not sure...There are no real specifications, which makes me nervous.


     


    I'm wondering what people would recommend in terms of the best lighting for overall healing (not wound healing) and mitochondrial function. 


     


    Also am wondering what the best color light is to promote relaxation during the day when one is stressed and unable;e to physically relax. 




    I am a little bit confused about your confusion :)


    I don't see your problem, since the lamp says: "Infrared Heat Lamp" ?!?!... and yes: it is the most effective for penetrating deep and helps healing/relaxing your muscles.


    The only thing with the lamp of the amazon link is, that it seems to be pretty expensive, and that is most likely due to the extravagant construction.


    Phillipps has very cheap infrared lights that will do the same!


    ---


    In the latest Podcast of Dave about light (#160 with Leanne Venier) they also discuss light for mitochondrial "enhancement"/making more of them and if I recall correctly it is light at ~850nm or so that Dave mentioned. I plan on researching this further and making sense of it.


    ---


    As to your last question I think we will have to differentiate.


    ...What do you want to relax? Your mind or your body?


    My answer might surprise you ;) - but I think the best light for relaxation during the day is... NO light. Darkness, closed eyes and maybe breathing exercises will promote the most alpha waves in your brain, hence relaxation.


     


    For physical relaxation... light... probably yeah: warm infrared light. But also probably a hot/warm bath and closed eyes.


     


    I don't think there is some "wonderlight" that, just by looking at it,... produces relaxation of any kind.


     




    I keep hearing "full spectrum lights" for indoor lighting. What should i be looking for if i want to buy some bulbs for daytime use in the home? 130v clear incandesent that seems pretty easy to get a hold of and cheap but is that the best option? Should i not diffuse the light through lamp shades or light fixture covers?




    This is a BIIIIIIIIG topic on which I am currently working and getting things sorted. Will answer/try to answer/update the guide in the next few days.


     


    Cheers




  • Hey, it's been a while. It is, to say the least, pretty overwhelming to cut through the BS out there and find solid information and good products.


    I'll try my best to answer your questions/help you further on your way..


    Well, in my opinion this, again, is a back to basics... or back to nature question. You will be in the best possible mood during daytime in light, that most closely resembles the full spectrum of the sun  AND also probably has light in the non-visible wavelength fraction -> which would be UV-A and UV-B. (OR obviously if you directly are in natural sunlight)


    Important to notice here is that your modd probably is not entirely just influenced by the visible part of light but also by the many (and probably more than we yet know of) HORMONAL changes that are initiated by UV-A/UV-B.


    More on my findings for this kind of light on the bottom of this thread! (and in version 2.0 of this guide, which is still to come)


     


    To your first part:


    This probably totally depends on your circumstances and for example WHEN you are going to bed.


    This is your natural melatonin production timing in "nature":


    j27mel-1.gif


     


    Now, it is important to understand that the science is pretty clear: Blue light, even small doses,... WILL disturb melatonin production and this is researched to play a role in chronic diseases, cancer, "and stuff".


    So Jack Kruse or whoever has a valid point, especially if you are planning to stay up late. It totally depends on your definition of what you mean by "at night".


     


    You say "but I don't think that's necessary at all. In fact, I think one can use appropriate lighting - largely red, infrared, orange, etc - all day up until bedtime, then sleep in darkness."


    I say: One SHOULD use appropriate lighting all day. BUT appropriate lighting is not red/infrared/orange like and incandescent light bulb:


    incandescent_spectrum_graph.jpg


     


    But should resemble daylight, which is:


    img3-C43H22.png


     


    What you, I guess, confuse is the notion of "just using a flashlight" / or complete darkness and "appropriate lighting" in the sense of "a little" or "a lot".


    IF you can find reddish "appropriate/a lot" light WITHOUT any blue wavelength: go ahead - but you won't. Hence, the recommendation of for example: Jack Kruse.


     


    You say "The Effects of Red and Blue Lights on Circadian Variations in Cortisol, Alpha Amylase, and Melatonin (again, shows red light doesn't suppress melatonin)"


    I say: You use the word "again" - as if opposing me... that doesnt make sense in that context because red light doesn't suppress melatonin... blue light does. BUT in "normal" light that "appears" red(ish), there will always be parts that are STILL BLUE and will suppress melatonin production (AT NIGHT... which is the only time you should care about this)


     


    Regarding your last part and Dr. Peat - I think that would be devestating. DURING THE DAY you should NOT limit blue light!!! You should OPTIMALLY have pure sunlight all day, and if that doesnt work, like for most western hemisphere people, you should get light, again, that is closest to natural daylight and hence, has a lot of blue in it.


    During the day you WANT to suppress melatonin in order to feel energized and awake.


     


    In this discussion "Volt" doesn't really matter that much. It is more about Kelvin, Lumen, the Spectrum and the resemblance of light to the sun.


    There is a way to make the spectrum visible as you suggested:


    http://www.viva-lite.co.uk/spectral-glasses.html


     


    I am a little bit confused about your confusion :)


    I don't see your problem, since the lamp says: "Infrared Heat Lamp" ?!?!... and yes: it is the most effective for penetrating deep and helps healing/relaxing your muscles.


    The only thing with the lamp of the amazon link is, that it seems to be pretty expensive, and that is most likely due to the extravagant construction.


    Phillipps has very cheap infrared lights that will do the same!


    ---


    In the latest Podcast of Dave about light (#160 with Leanne Venier) they also discuss light for mitochondrial "enhancement"/making more of them and if I recall correctly it is light at ~850nm or so that Dave mentioned. I plan on researching this further and making sense of it.


    ---


    As to your last question I think we will have to differentiate.


    ...What do you want to relax? Your mind or your body?


    My answer might surprise you ;) - but I think the best light for relaxation during the day is... NO light. Darkness, closed eyes and maybe breathing exercises will promote the most alpha waves in your brain, hence relaxation.


     


    For physical relaxation... light... probably yeah: warm infrared light. But also probably a hot/warm bath and closed eyes.


     


    I don't think there is some "wonderlight" that, just by looking at it,... produces relaxation of any kind.


     


    This is a BIIIIIIIIG topic on which I am currently working and getting things sorted. Will answer/try to answer/update the guide in the next few days.


     


    Cheers




     


    I'm running short on time, so I'll try to address things quickly.


     


    (1): Nothing I was saying was opposing anything you said, nor do I believe I made it seem so, and that was not my intention.


     


    (2): Mimicking sunlight is optimal if you think that being exposed to UV rays and white and blue light all day is optimal. I have yet to see ANY evidence that is the case. I've seen evidence that light promotes mitochondrial functioning, and that living in well lit areas leads to less all cause mortality and things like that, but none of the research has proven (or even come close to proving) that it's all these aspects of sunlight that is beneficial. Here is a blog I wrote on the topic awhile back. As I indicate in it, there are clear benefits to exposure to UV light, but dosing is key, and more is not only not better, it is harmful.


     


    (3) There are very large errors in your argument. You understand that there are a multitude of variables that impact the color of light emitted from a source, correct? For instance, simply covering a bulb (or surrounding it) with a colored filter promotes more light in that color to be emitted, through a process known as transmittance. In fact, passing halogen light through a source of water increases various wavelengths of light so much, it's used clinically in a therapy known as water filtered infrared-a radiation. Sunlight's color spectrum varies widelyyy. It depends on time of day, latitude/longitude, altitude of where you live, etc. Live in Mexico at high altitude and get out in the early morning and late evening, and, well, there is a ton more red and infrared light.


     


    (4): I'm hopeful you realize that 130 volt incandescent bulbs run at 110-120 volts has more red light than a regular ol' incandescent bulb, correct? See these two posts: Red light experiment (120V vs. 130V) and Red Light Therapy - Continued. I'm getting a spectrometer and a diffraction grating to assess the quality of light from bulbs. "Regarding your last part and Dr. Peat - I think that would be devestating. DURING THE DAY you should NOT limit blue light!!!" Where is your evidence for this? I see none whatsoever. I disagree - I don't want much blue light during the day at all, and I want red light all day. Red light is 'regulatory'; it can increase your alertness, or help you sleep, as evidenced by the studies I posted above. It can increase your alertness (without altering melatonin) and it can, interestingly, rid people of insomnia. So, red light during the day will keep one nice and alert, and probably rather jovial. You may have missed my point in my comment above. Scott at Heelspurs came to the conclusion that "Our ancestors have been exposed to 0.01 to 0.03 W/cm^2 of sunlight in the red to near-infrared range for up to 6 hours a day, giving an average daily dosage in the hundreds of J/cm^2 for very large areas of skin. "


     


    I speak to people who use 130 volt clear incandescent bulbs exclusively (run at 110-120 volts) and have had nothing but benefits. They in fact use it for 16-18 hours a day. They use it on animals, infants, children, etc. For injuries, for thyroid health, etc. The electricity at my current apartment is too poor to use the dozens of 150-250 watt, 130 volt clear incandecent bulbs I'd like to use, but I've switched out the bulbs in my living room to bulbs as close to this, and, well, lo and behold I've had nothing but benefits. In fact, my fiance who is completely unaware of the research on red light-cytochrome c oxidase always describes how relaxing it is to come and sit in the living room under the very bright lights. There are many people who recommend incandescent lights, and they haven't even looked into all the information (using 130 volt bulbs at 110-120 volts, using filters, etc). Some of which are:


     


    - Dietrich Klinghardt, MD, PhD


    - Steven Fowkes, PhD


    - Lloyd Burrell


    - Ray Peat, PhD


    - John Kellogg, MD


    - Basically everyone who is certified in Bau Biology (which I plan on getting some certifications in after undergrad)


     


    Have you read Dr. Kellog's book "Light Therapeutics"? It has a ton of references, and tons of anecdotes and personal experiences on using none other than incandescent light bulbs. Here is a file with a bunch of quotes from the book. Here are some good ones:


     


    "Schamberg, of Philadelphia, found that an ordinary 16-candle power incandescent light with a reflector, although comparatively poor in actinic rays, will produce enough light to pass through the skin, subcutaneous tissue, muscles and mucous membrane, and affect a photographic plate in the mouth in thirty seconds, while in another test a light very rich in chemical rays (a mercury


    vapor light) was not able to produce any effect in five minutes.


    Musck found that red, orange and yellow rays passed through his hand and affected a photographic plate in five seconds, while the blue, violet and ultra-violet rays from the same source produced no effect in ten minutes."


     


    "In addition to its power to relieve high blood-pressure and pain, its thermic properties have a stimulant effect on metabolism, and its efficacy in increasing the hemoglobin-carrying power of the red cells renders the incandescent light valuable in a variety of conditions.“


     


    "Holm uses also a full bath with incandescent and arc lights representing 5,000 candle-power and a local light bath for the part affected, which can be applied in the bed, but the combined bath described above has the most powerful effect on the metabolism, although it requires a normal heart and resistant nerves.”


     


    I recommend you get his book. Someone sent me a download for it. I may be able to find it and upload it if anyone wishes (may take some time, though). There's a bunch of other things I want to mention, too, but will when I have more time. Anyhow, it's time to abandon the b.s. 'evolutionary' ideas on what is optimal for us. For one, we never stopped evolving. I don't want to be a paleo person. After years of chronic illness, a goal in mind would be to become a star child-like being, not reverting back to what some random researcher believes is what we were thousands or hundreds of thousands of years ago. Secondly, we are in a different environment nowadays, with new toxins, less nutrients, etc. Thirdly, here is so much debate on diet and evolution it's not even funny. Nathaniel J. Dominy, Katharine Milton, PhD, and their colleagues are much more well researched than the likes of Cunnane and Crawford, and guess what? They don't think things like fish and meat and a cold wet environment built our brain. Quite the contrary, actually. This throws the paleo(religion)sphere upside down. My point is that evolutionary based arguments are bunk. We have no idea what we were like long ago, and even if we did that doesn't even mean it was optimal. It just means it 'just was'. I'm not saying you are basing your ideas on evolutionary grounds, but it seems as though you are, at least partly.

    http://equilibriohm.wordpress.com/

    http://biohacksblog.com/

    Natural ability without education has more often raised a man to glory and virtue than education without natural ability. - Marcus Aurelius 

  • DManDMan Master of Arts ✭✭✭

    Hey, I studied light design at the university of applied sciences and yes color theory is basics but imagine a room with a black wall and a room with an orange wall. my prof dr. roland greule who works for airbus, mercedes and emirates taught me the color affects mood a lot. There have been studies with adjustable LED lights and people who worked in an office were able to set color and brightness whenever they wanted. I recall from my memory and I was hoping you to talk about that in detail but I think green has been a color the liked to choose a loot between lunch and breakfast. green makes you happy. I for example mix my LED with blue and some green during the day. because it feels most pleasent to my eyes and it mixes well with the green trees outside of my window. ;) So I encourage you as a designer and artist to talk in depth about the basics most people don't know about yet. I've also seen studie on how a mixture between diffuse light and direct light feels most comfortable....


    May you be well, may you be happy, may you be healthy, may you be loved.

    How much to eat:
    advanced | How to train: bulletproof training | HRV: HRV FOR TRAINING HRV BASICS What Affects HRV | Brain  & Memory dual n back training advanced training

     

     

  • that first post seems very similar to that doctor that posted those images on the Irene podcast when Dave was interviewing her.   are you that doctor?


  • Hey,


     


    Updated everything to Version 2.0


     




    that first post seems very similar to that doctor that posted those images on the Irene podcast when Dave was interviewing her.   are you that doctor?




    No I am not, why? :)


  • Guys,


     


    You'll have to excuse me as I'm entirely too busy right now to filter through all the data here.. but is there an abridged version on the correct bulbs to use for:


     


    1) Winding down before bed to simulate sunset/stimulate melatonin?


    2) Waking up in the morning?


     


    Lastly, are the phone screen covers from lowbluelight.com sufficient to use over a cell phone towards night time or is it best to just avoid screens of any kind?


     


    I purchased a $1.99 orange light bulb to place in my bedroom light but is this sufficient? Is red preferred? I'd like to set this and forget this...


  • okay, so which brand of light bulbs to buy for home use? I need those for my table and floor lamps. Thanks


  • DManDMan Master of Arts ✭✭✭
    edited April 2015

    You want as Little Blue light in your eyes as Possible. So red would be good. Blue blocker glasses are best. Infrared Lamps May be of interest as well. At least for me they have a huuuge Effect. And uvb as well. This is probably Because i have a Problem with my mitochondria. I get much more effect from light than from pemfs.


    Jack Kruse has a very interesting theory about light, mitochondria and ms. Joe Mcohen Introduced me to that today when i Reported to him about the effect. For him pemf has A bigger Impact than lllt. So Try it for yourself and make Sure that there is Almost Zero Blue light, Not in the bulb and Not from tv or any other Screens in Order to get the Desired effect. In the Morning i do both uv and infrared. I might be a Little Extreme with it but i get noticeable benefits from it.


     


    Sorry for the spelling (german autocomplete from iPhone)...


    May you be well, may you be happy, may you be healthy, may you be loved.

    How much to eat:
    advanced | How to train: bulletproof training | HRV: HRV FOR TRAINING HRV BASICS What Affects HRV | Brain  & Memory dual n back training advanced training

     

     

  • edited March 2017

    What are you guys doing for non-LED night lights and also inside the fridge? That fluorescent bastard is brutal in there.

    I'm working on going all incandescent in my house and zero LED based on what Dr. Wunsch's work.

  • Benny - Most of this thread is beyond my full comprehension but I wear blue blocking glasses when I'm home in the evening. This addresses that horrible light in the fridge. I've been wearing something pretty close to these for about a year

    https://www.amazon.com/Uvex-S0360X-Ultra-spec-SCT-Orange-Anti-Fog/dp/B003OBZ64M/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1489262816&sr=8-5&keywords=blue+blocking+glasses

    but am going to purchase a pair of Swanwick's in about a week. The plastic lenses of the safety glasses are getting scratched and a little distorted. Since I wear them almost nightly, I'm investing in a more stylish and hopefully better made pair.

    I also went to home depot and switched out a bunch of LED / fluorescent lights for incandescent recently and I like the color of the light much more. I don't think I've noticed any biological effects, but it looks more pleasant.

  • Stefan - thanks so much for collating/synthesizing this thread = in simplest terms light is a cornerstone of our health, and a natural drug pathway ... amazing that we're not doing more about this. Best thing to do is to get outside in the morning (15-30 minutes at a minimum) and minimize exposure to artificial light at night. Another alternative is to bring natural light back inside, check-out www.sunlightinside.com for more information. I'm a scientist and engineer who is very active in this field, so please feel free to reach-out (konrad(AT)sunlightinside(DOT)com). We are still in the early days of understanding all the benefits of natural light, and other ways to hack/benefit from light = lots more to come on this exciting topic!

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