Glass Bottle Mineral Water Vs Filtered Tap

riggykriggyk
edited October 2014 in General Discussion

What's the true BP option? -- What is more economically feasible?


 


What are ya'll doing? -- I've been buying boat loads of Gersolsteiner and other kinds of glassed waters but the economist in me is thinking a $300 RO filter would pay for itself very quickly, but that begs the question: of which is healthier? 


Comments

  • SkeletorSkeletor The Conqueror Worm ✭✭✭

    I drink a lot of Gerolsteiner as well. It does get a little pricy, but it's high quality stuff. Worth the cost, IMO.


     


    It you're interested in getting a reverse osmosis filter and saving some money in the long run though, John Brisson has recommended this model. IIRC it purifies the water and then adds the minerals back in afterward. I intend to pick this thing up whenever I manage to buy a house of my own. You can also enhance the mineral content of RO water by adding in your own trace minerals. If you're willing to do some research, you could use something like this to make your water just as good as Gerolsteiner in the way of mineral content. Perhaps better, even. And then, if you prefer sparkling water, you could even pick up a SodaStream system and make your own carbonated mineral water.


    "I know how to despise mere cool intelligence. What I want is intelligence matched by pure, physical existence, like a statue." --Yukio Mishima

     

    Let's be friends on MyFitnessPal!



  • I drink a lot of Gerolsteiner as well. It does get a little pricy, but it's high quality stuff. Worth the cost, IMO.


     


    It you're interested in getting a reverse osmosis filter and saving some money in the long run though, John Brisson has recommended this model. IIRC it purifies the water and then adds the minerals back in afterward. I intend to pick this thing up whenever I manage to buy a house of my own. You can also enhance the mineral content of RO water by adding in your own trace minerals. If you're willing to do some research, you could use something like this to make your water just as good as Gerolsteiner in the way of mineral content. Perhaps better, even. And then, if you prefer sparkling water, you could even pick up a SodaStream system and make your own carbonated mineral water.




     


    Thanks for this. -- So realistically can a RO filter like the one above purify water to spring/bottled/mineral type quality? -- Not thinking minerals but thinking in terms of getting rid of flouride type chemical treatments and public water source toxins.

  • SkeletorSkeletor The Conqueror Worm ✭✭✭

    I imagine (though I'm not 100% certain) that a filter like this one would result in water of greater purity than a natural spring. Natural springs can become polluted with any number of things. If this filter works well, then it stands to reason that you'd be getting far lower levels of toxins, since the water will be thoroughly filtered. I don't know what Gerolsteiner or San Pellegrino's process is like, of course. But yes, any reverse osmosis filter should be able to yank fluoride, chemicals and more from tap water.


    "I know how to despise mere cool intelligence. What I want is intelligence matched by pure, physical existence, like a statue." --Yukio Mishima

     

    Let's be friends on MyFitnessPal!



  • I imagine (though I'm not 100% certain) that a filter like this one would result in water of greater purity than a natural spring. Natural springs can become polluted with any number of things. If this filter works well, then it stands to reason that you'd be getting far lower levels of toxins, since the water will be thoroughly filtered. I don't know what Gerolsteiner or San Pellegrino's process is like, of course. But yes, any reverse osmosis filter should be able to yank fluoride, chemicals and more from tap water.




     


    Gotcha. -- Seems this is the way to go.


     


    Is it odd to ask for a water filter for Christmas? haha!

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