I'm Sure This Topic Has Been Done To Death But..importance Of Distance Training.....

...In regards to combat sports such as boxing and muay thai. I know it seems like its an everyday part of the sports/culture of the fight game but is that because its always has been or is it because there's really a value in distance training? I went to my first amateur muay thai event this weekend and it seemed to me like some of the fighters gassed after the first major flurry of strikes. I'm sure they did a ton of conditioning/road work as part of their training but at the surface it seems to me that distance running doesn't have much application when its only three, two minute rounds going on. 

Do you guys feel like more explosive, higher intensity interval training is a better supplement to actual fight training than the typical "road work" type distance training. It would seem things like sprints, kettle bell swings, burpees, running hills would have more carry over into fighting than straight distance running. I'm also willing to bet that there is some value to taxing the aerobic system via distance running but is too much emphasis placed on such? I mean just training muay thai/boxing in and of itself is aerobically challenging enough.


What do you guys think? I know if you want to get better at any sport, you do that sport. But what do you guys feel is the best way to supplement actual practicing of the sport with?


Comments

  • Getting stronger using barbell lifts.


     


    You can make a sub-maximal movement easier, by making it more sub-maximal.


     


    If you are pedaling a bicycle and each pedal stroke is 5% of your total strength, and you can squat 100lbs. Do squats until you can squat 200 lbs, now the equivalent pedal stroke is 2.5% of your total strength. 


     


    #1 get stronger


     


    #2 practice the sport at the same intensity you will be competing at. Why run for 2 hours at 150BPM heart rate, in an aerobic state, when you will be fighting for 3 minutes at near maximal heart rates, in an anaerobic state?


     


    #3 Maybe some interval training - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-intensity_interval_training#Tabata_regimen


  • Agree with the above, and add in a bit of supplimental training. Things that will get you moving and adjusted to being more off-balance. Barefoot running, yoga, dance, obsticle courses... things to reinforce the joints in non-directional movements, things to help the balance and strengthen support muscles...


  • from my experience, the best way to get better at something is to do the closest thing to that thing that you can. usually that just means doing the thing more, or at least trying your best to recreate the exact conditions that you will be performing in. Body By Science has a pretty good chapter about this that talks about the difference between skill training and physical conditioning. 


  • Look at CrossFit WOD's designed to replicate the intensity of these kinds of sports.


    Make up your own, that has "rounds" that reflect the demands of the event.


     


    I like full squat cleans that end in thrusters. 


  • Distance training definitely plays it's part in boxing but more at a professional level. As an amateur I did more of a cross training style workout twice a week with sprints once a week and a long run once a week on top of my boxing training. Now as a professional I do long runs a lot more, you need your legs conditioned for longer fights and it's something you only get from longer runs. I do two longer road runs, usually 10-15km (7-10 mile) with two lots of interval sprints plus my boxing training. 




  • I wonder if working towards fight time domains by skipping for 5 rounds of 5:00 on and 1:00 off or boxing of 12 rounds of 3:00 on and 1:00 off would serve well.




     


    I've always wondered why we don't hear about fighters "hyperclocking," e.g. training 5 rounds of 6:00 with 0:45 rests. The idea being that that come fight time, 5 minute rounds with a minute break would feel like a walk in the park (while getting mugged, I guess, it's still a fight.) 

  • RekaReka ✭✭✭

    What do you guys think of the Randy Couture barbell complex? (six exercises without putting it down, eight reps each, this is one cycle, one minute rest and repeat it five times for six total cycles) I love it.


    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

  • Training on a physiological level, and training on a psychological level, are two different things. There's a reasonable probability that some of those 'gassed-out' fighters were physiologically prepared, but psychologically under-prepared.




  • Seems like skipping rope would more closely mimic fighting/boxing movement patterns than running would, plus less damage, no? I wonder if working towards fight time domains by skipping for 5 rounds of 5:00 on and 1:00 off or boxing of 12 rounds of 3:00 on and 1:00 off would serve well.




    I usually skip 2-3 times a week. Usually it's 15-20 minutes straight, some days our coach gets us to 45-60 minutes of continous skipping. Skipping is too easy of an exercise for a professional boxer to be resting 1 minute per every 3 mins of work. MMA is different, but boxers do a lot of sparring and bag work which replicates the timing of a fight, exercises like skipping and roadwork are just for base conditioning. 



  • Training on a physiological level, and training on a psychological level, are two different things. There's a reasonable probability that some of those 'gassed-out' fighters were physiologically prepared, but psychologically under-prepared.




     


    I think this is true, especially with it being an amateur show. The reason you'll see someone like James Toney go 12 rounds when he is +30lb overweight is because he can stay relaxed and doesnt waste energy through nerves. I've seen crossfitters gas out in 3x90 second round amateur fights. 

  • The movement is inefficient. Practice should be economical with movement. Most fighting styles are using strength (for speed and power) instead of gravity. The postures require energy to move in and out of rather than being natural and stable movements. Typical movements require a shift of weight before and then balance after and this uses up a lot of resources. Think about the way you drink. Chances are you tense your shoulder(s) and your elbow sticks out. This is not economical movement.


     


    Many martial artists rise and fall through out the fight, which is expensive. Feints are also expensive, indecisive movement means that a strike requires energy to be reserved in order to retract it, it is more economical to continue moving onwards rather than retract a failed attack.


     


    Speed, strength and endurance have limits. You can always become more efficient. The thing that I appreciate about long runs is that when the body tires the inefficient mistakes it makes become exaggerated and easier to rectify.


  • RekaReka ✭✭✭
    edited January 2015

    I just got hooked on descending pyramid burpees. You start with a certain number, let's say 15. Rest20-30 seconds, do 14, rest the same, do 13 and go down to 1. Just warm up your wrists a lot before starting (I didn't :( ).


     


    Edit: And my favourite part of this setup is that you know that each subsequent set will be a bit easier than the one(s) you already completed, I find that motivating especially as I get tired.


    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

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