Actual Bulletproof Atheltic Performance Call Out

edited November 2014 in Physical Performance

Is there anyone on the forums or anyone who strictly follows the bulletproof diet that is a high level athletic performer?  


I can't seem to find anyone on the forums who is particularly strong, no active power lifters I can see, no bodybuilders natural or otherwise seem to grace these forums or adhere the diet.  


Katolotus and maybe Jason Miller seem to be the only ones getting it done.  If you are as well please let me know so we can trade ideas and protocols.   



If their are we need to represent for our peoples. 


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Comments

  • SkeletorSkeletor The Conqueror Worm ✭✭✭

    Lol, nah, I'm pretty sure Jason Miller's full of crap. Probably gets winded just trying to get off of the couch, am I right? :P


     


    Hasn't Dave interviewed (and maybe sponsored?) an MMA fighter? I don't remember what podcast it was, though...


    "I know how to despise mere cool intelligence. What I want is intelligence matched by pure, physical existence, like a statue." --Yukio Mishima

     

    Let's be friends on MyFitnessPal!

  • Depends on what you mean by follow the bulletproof diet STRICTLY.... I have won many half marathons, marathons, half ironman... I have been sponsored by New Balance, Now Foods, Saucony..... I am currently training for my first ultra which I hope to win and powerlifting meet which I hope to win..... I eat ALL Bulletproof but I don't do IF and I don't do the Bulletproof Coffee... I eat a sweet potato everyday, various nuts, raw cheese, and cottage cheese... but I also work out 25-30 hours a week... today was my first full REST day in about 2months because I ran 27 miles yesterday.....




  • Maybe?




     


    It's on a >400lb dead lift meausrement unless you're Katolotus at <%0.5 BF


    jks tho

     



  • Thats why I like being short (5'6"), It makes it more challenging, though if I try to get much heavier than 200lbs it'll affect my gymnastics.

    Powerlifts- 350 squat, 380 dead, 285 bench

    Weightlifting- 185 snatch, 245 clean, 235 c&j





    Where are the gymnastics vids?



  • Is there anyone on the forums or anyone who strictly follows the bulletproof diet that is a high level athletic performer?  


    I can't seem to find anyone on the forums who is particularly strong, no active power lifters I can see, no bodybuilders natural or otherwise seem to grace these forums or adhere the diet.  


    Katolotus and maybe Jason Miller seem to be the only ones getting it done.  If you are as well please let me know so we can trade ideas and protocols.   



    If their are we need to represent for our peoples. 




     


    Well Dave is an advocate of Body by Science, with minimal exercise, and states that many people overtrain.(I tend to agree, just from personal experience but everyone is different)


     


    I found I couldn't afford too train intensely too often, the next day I was too tired as my body spent time repairing itself to do work properly, so have to settle for 40 mins moderate exercise 2/3 a week with stretches every morning. I found carbs absolutely necessary when training and I'd posit that most bodybuilders feel this way also, so  the whole no carb thing may push them away from this forum. And lots of body builders knew about the cholesterol myth and ate plenty of steak,bacon and eggs long before the BP diet came about, but they don't have white labcoats so nobody cared.

  • OP isn't soliciting Dave's opinion on high level physical training (that's been clear from the start), he's asking if one can perform physically at a high level while following most if not all Bulletproof precepts.


     


    I think a more informative line of questioning would be: are there any Bulletproof rules that have to be thrown out in order to train and perform at a high level, and why?


     


    For me, the biggest issue is the battle between food quality and quantity. When you're expending a lot of energy and stimulating renewal, you needs lots of raw material. Following BP strictly doesn't leave a lot of culinary variety. Either your wallet burns out in order to maintain quality or your taste buds do. Keep in mind that your typical athlete has a job and other responsibilities, so they don't have time to develop a world class menu and cook it every day... don't forget the time training that makes them an athlete.


    Selected threads from the BP forum (Use your own signature to highlight threads that you think are important or significant)

  • If you are a high level athlete, just eat enough carbs in proportion training volume.  A diet that is high in nutrients, low in allergens/toxins and anti-inflammatory is going to promote recovery and performance.


     


    I am a bjj guy, get my cardio done on a road bike, and have been using kettlebells (simple and sinister with the 32kg bell, working on getting to the 48kg) the last few months.  Last friday I hit the weight room and worked up to a 435x5 deadlift.  If I spent more time in the gym I could pull 500 in 3 months no problem, but that's not my goal.  Felt strong with plenty of gas in the tank, but I never train to failure.  I always eat carbs after workouts.


     


    2000-4000 calories a day.  Bulletproof coffee 50% of the time, always with protein.  Sometimes breakfast is bulletproof coffee, with collagen, eggs and bacon for 1,000 cals.  I eat 3-6 raw egg yolks a day mixed into meals bi bim bap style.  During the week I am pretty much 90-100% green zone.  Weekends I usually have a few drinks with friends and eat out at restaurants but don't really over do it.


     


    Definitely no elite athlete, but I am stronger than most people, and feel the bulletproof diet helps me make food choices that support my goals.  Also has helped me notice the effect of food.  A lot of my soft tissue injuries from years of weight lifting, bjj, crashing on bikes, running, and generally being an idiot are clearing up.  My skin looks better than ever and I pass for 18-22.  Tried to buy beer at a football game a few weeks back and they didn't believe I was 28, had to call the supervisor over.


     


    I think where people run into problems is they either they don't eat enough food, don't eat enough carbs or exercise too much.  There is a sweet spot where those variables overlap.


  • I don't consider myself an elite athlete or anything, but I do notice that even super in-shape folks who come to my capoeira classes always get pretty worn out just doing our warm up exercises. I eat green zone foods about 95% of the time and never dip into the red zone as far as I know. Eating BP helps me reliably be ready to teach/play/train without having sluggish days. I've probably gone easier on myself than necessary since goin BP with all the talk of overtraining, but still kickin ass.
  • This is my first post. I follow the BP diet and was an elite athlete. I still lift fairly heavy and do CrossFit 5x/week to stay in shape. I'm not generally self promotional - but as you are wanting to know about elite athletes - I am a 2x Olympian (2000 & 2004) and still capable of lifting moderately heavy weight (42 years old, 6'1", 245 lbs, 10% body fat, squat 500#, deadlift 600#). My entire athletic life I've been continuously eating (and continuously hungry) generally following "The Zone" diet. The greatest part for me of going BulletProof is that I am no longer hungry every minute of every day. The hardest part for me in the transition was actually consuming enough fat. When I started I felt I was starving - just because I had reduced my carbs and I thought I was eating more fat, but it just wasn't enough. I personally love that I no longer have to eat so frequently. Where I'm not bulletproof is post-workout recovery. I use a post workout recovery supplement product that I've used my entire career that is a 3:1 carb to protein ratio. I struggle most in the evenings - my old habits of continually eating kick in - and I want to eat more. Maybe I need to follow my own advice and eat more fat with dinner, or maybe due to my size, maybe I should eat another meal, I'm not sure.  


     


    But my goals are different than most people posting for performance.  Truth-be-told, lifting heavy or building, gaining, or even maintaining muscle is no longer important to me. I do maintain this muscle mass, but that's not my objective.  My goal is to be healthy, heal my joints, and hopefully live for a long time!  (How many big, muscular, old people do you know.... :(


     


    I look forward to being part of the BP community.


  • I'm a hobbyist natural bodybuilder now focusing on powerlifting.  My numbers are similar to Jason's (approx 380 squat, 345 dead, 260 bench), but am increasing those daily, it seems to me... currently following Westside Barbell training.

    My bodybuilding self-tracking logs is at http://jguimondbb.tumblr.com/ (be forewarned: wearing a speedo in the videos, because my body so bootylicious, baby)... get ready for my jelly.


  • RekaReka ✭✭✭


    (be forewarned: wearing a speedo in the videos




     


    If you accept an advice: don't wear them in the future. You will attract even more visitors.

    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.



  • I don't consider myself an elite athlete or anything, but I do notice that even super in-shape folks who come to my capoeira classes always get pretty worn out just doing our warm up exercises. I eat green zone foods about 95% of the time and never dip into the red zone as far as I know. Eating BP helps me reliably be ready to teach/play/train without having sluggish days. I've probably gone easier on myself than necessary since goin BP with all the talk of overtraining, but still kickin ass.




     


    Don't underestimate yourself!  I see you talk about capoeira a lot so I know it's a passion of yours, and as much as you do it, that's hard shit man.  When I worked out 5 days a week and was ripped I was like 6'3, 175 or so.. and started BJJ I quickly learned that no, I was not "in shape".  I always wanted to do capoeira and be good at it, but I never had enough room anywhere to do it and I didn't have a big mirror to practice in front of.  I think it's really cool you're so fired up about that because I admire the art a great deal.

  • You won't find anyone particularly strong doing body by science or any other "hack" exercise program. To get strong you have to lift heavy weights, often enough and with enough intensity to force continued adaptation, all of the people here trying to hack their exercise either don't understand that, or don't care.


     


    I personally was unable to recover with minimal amount of carbs, and it's hard consuming enough calories with daily interval fasting. So the changes I made were eat more often, eat more carbs, and obviously don't follow the exercise advice, I prefer to train, not exercise. My goal this coming year is to squat 500.




  • Don't underestimate yourself!  I see you talk about capoeira a lot so I know it's a passion of yours, and as much as you do it, that's hard shit man.  When I worked out 5 days a week and was ripped I was like 6'3, 175 or so.. and started BJJ I quickly learned that no, I was not "in shape".  I always wanted to do capoeira and be good at it, but I never had enough room anywhere to do it and I didn't have a big mirror to practice in front of.  I think it's really cool you're so fired up about that because I admire the art a great deal.




     


    You can get a lot of training done with a small amount of room, or outside, or in a gym or community center. It's ideal to have enough space to throw some kicks but other than that, small spaces actually force you to be more aware of your surroundings. Sometimes we play in a pretty small circle. And mirrors are totally unnecessary. They can be somewhat useful, and in some ways can be a hindrance actually, but definitely not necessary. What is necessary is a good teacher and a lot of motivation.



  • To get strong you have to lift heavy weights, often enough and with enough intensity to force continued adaptation, all of the people here trying to hack their exercise either don't understand that, or don't care.




     


    Hopefully I'm not taking this too far out of context, but i gotta say i disagree with at least the first part of this sentence. I totally respect the ability and passion some folks have to pick up heavy things, and understand that lifting weights has a ton of great benefits, but I still think that if your definition of strength is limited to that then you have a narrow perspective on strength. There are insanely strong people (and animals!) out there who have never lifted a weight in their lives. There are people who lift super heavy weights all the time who can't do basic movements that should come naturally to humans, which i see as weakness. If you can shoulder press 5 gazillion pounds but can't do 2 handstand pushups, how strong are you really? I do agree with the 2nd part of your sentence, that to make the greatest adaptations you have to apply a stimulus with some frequency, but I think that adapting to picking up barbells is only one type of stimulus/adaptation, not the end all be all of "strength". I think that people should be able to get the vast majority of their movement "nutrients" through their daily living and just doing what they need to do and/or enjoy doing, the same way we should be able to get most of our nutrients from our food, and I see "exercise" as a supplement, which we can get by without but compliments and enhances our real food/movement nutrition. BBS is not something i'm passionate about, I enjoy it in a way but its like the vitamin k/d/a that I take with the grass fed butter that is capoeira/yoga/hiking/etc. If lifting things is your passion, awesome, but i just don't think that it makes sense to tell folks that "if you aren't picking up barbells, you're not strong". To me that's like telling people that if they aren't spending $500 a month on supplements that they're deficient in nutrients no matter how healthy they're eating. 

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