Delayed Quarter-Life Crisis - Changing Career

Hi Forum - 


 


I've been doing Public Relations successfully for six years. And I've out grown it in just about every possible way. It's time for a change. Trouble is - I have too many plausible options and I don't know where to start. 


 


I'll provide more details to my specific situation below - but for those who are in a hurry and have quick help to offer - here's what I'm looking for in a nut shell: Bulletproof approved


  • career resources
  • career coaching recommendations
  • career change books

If you have any recommendations to those points, please let me know. I'd be very grateful for the guidance. 


 


Now for the long version - 


I've known for months now that the consumer, product based PR is not my thing. I'm good at it (by good at it I mean that I've exceeded every milestone my clients set on 1/3 the budget) - but it's not fun, not interesting, and not worthwhile.


 


In my personal life, I found out that my family and I will be moving back to Austin, Texas in the first quarter of 2015. I'm excited about it - but not excited about the job hunt. And especially considering I'm looking make a change to some unknown career, I'm really not even sure what my long-term direction is to take a first step with the new job hunt.  


 


Last month, I did career aptitude testing at Johnson O Connor and I have many aptitudes in key areas. After speaking with them and doing my own homework, I've taken a list of 57 potential career paths and whittled them down to 6 or so options - and one very vague thing that isn't any definable career. 


 


Typically - I'm a very decisive person - almost too decisive. So my reticence and feeling of being overwhelmed by my choices is very unsettling and unfamiliar. While I'm trying to take a systematic approach to guiding myself - I'm in over my head. And I'm in no way ashamed to ask for help. 


 


Trouble is - good (reliable, practical, seasoned, executive-level) help is not that easy to find. That's where the Bulletproof Forum comes in. 


 


You all have answered every question I've ever posted and I get so much more than health advice from Dave and friends. I'm hoping that some of your collective wisdom can be shared to help me find my path. 


 


Thanks for those who read and respond! 


Cheers,


Cassieleigh


Comments

  • lav2klav2k Comic Creator

    The Four Hour Work Week by Tim Ferriss is pretty solid. 


  • SkeletorSkeletor The Conqueror Worm ✭✭✭


    The Four Hour Work Week by Tim Ferriss is pretty solid. 




    I would second this recommendation.

    "I know how to despise mere cool intelligence. What I want is intelligence matched by pure, physical existence, like a statue." --Yukio Mishima

     

    Let's be friends on MyFitnessPal!

  • Star ChaserStar Chaser Powered by Shred
    I never got anything from the four hour workweek and think it is the absolute opposite mindset you should have towards your career. That being said I seem to be in the minority. I'd be interested in hearing what the 6 options and vague idea is. Ideally you want to transition smoothly from one career to another, using the skills you've built all ready in your current job while nudging your way into your target job. For example if you were a lawyer and had a quarter life crisis and thought that a fiction writer is your true calling, you would start out writing about law while slowly transitioning to fiction.

    I am a Video Game composer under the pseudonym Star Chaser.

    twitch.tv/starchaservgm (streaming most saturday and sunday nights EST)

    Guitarist:

    https://youtu.be/8L0SkovqEf4

    Next cover is Die by the Sword by Dragonforce.

    Music/Health/Biohacking Blog and Podcast currently under construction.

    Thanks to the internet, health experts, and my unending curiosity, I have overcome: excessive sweating (adrenal fatigue), anxiety and panic attacks, extremely high estrogen levels (man boobs), chronic brain fog (yeast overgrowth), depression, and am currently battling SIBO (took it from being so bloated it felt like my stomach skin was going to rip, slept 2 hours per night for a week because of upset stomach and being chronically fatigued to very mild, manageable but still annoying symptoms) and currently battling sleep deprivation/insomnia probably due to the SIBO/Leaky Gut and resulting histamine intolerance.

  • Agree with Roxas. 4 hour workweek is a good intro to being an entrepreneur. But you didn't say your goal is to "start an online business while covering my expenses by working my PR job, and then once my online business covers all my expenses, quit my PR job and go fulltime into my new career (or fulltime back to school in order to change careers.)" 


     


    More power to you if that is your goal, but it's not like you read the book and 4 hours later you're wealthy.


     


    Give us more info. And are there any educational programs / trainings to help you prepare for the new career? Can you audit an intro class at the local university to get more perspective on whether it's the right field for you?


  • edited December 2014

    Hi Folks -


     


    Thanks for responding.


     


    I'm not ruling out being an entrepreneur so 4 Hour Work Week is on my list. The question is, "entrepreneur of what?" 


     


    For a basic background in what I already do - it's essentially project management and media relations for brands. I work with reporters and journalists to include my client's products in their stories. I've done this for luxury brands, tech brands, sporting goods, baby equipment and toys, non profits, pharma, local transportation.... and so on. 


     


    There are only a few things that I've liked about my career thus far: 


    - media relations - it's a fun puzzle to figure out which reporter would be interested in a story and what angle would get a response. 


    - crisis communications - planning for crisis and managing a crisis freaks most people out. It's fun for me. 


    - intern hiring/training/mentoring - this is hands down my favorite part of what I do - training young professionals to be better. 


     


    I'm not opposed to going back to school if needed - I'd just have to be damned sure that the chose career path has enough longevity to justify the additional time and money spent. 


     


    Tycho's Nose and Roxas - here are the fields that I'm considering with some thoughts on each: 


     


    - college professor of PR - this is pretty obvious given my favorite part of my job. Two hitches. A) I'd need to get at least a masters in PR to teach PR. A masters in PR is absolutely pointless except to teach. B ) This career path does not have a lot of longevity as a stand alone. If you don't keep current in the business, you lose student's respect. At most I'd have five years of pure teaching with the experience I have now so I'd have to combine real world with the academic world. Adjunct professor is about as high as I'd go.  


     


    - crisis media relations - this has lots of potential, and is high on my list. I'd need to find an agency specializing in it and that shouldn't be that hard. The only hitch is I'm not sure how long this will keep my attention and satisfy me. 


     


    - PR for something that actually matters - other than crisis, to stay in PR I'd like to take my knowledge of working with consumer based media to things that actually matter. Energy resources and consumption, nutrition, small businesses going beyond their market of influence. However, when it comes to PR, you typically can't pick your clients. 


     


    - clinical dietitian - clearly living Bulletproof, and being an advocate to my loved ones, this is an appealing career. Though knowing how most dietitians still think of whole grains as a dietary staple, I'm not sure how I'd fit. 


     


    - Big Data analyst with agent based modeling - this is the only thing in the marketing field that gets my juices going. Solving problems and answering questions with 90 percent accurate forecasting? Yes, please! But I have only a surface level understanding of how the softwares work, the data is collected and all the things that I don't know about this. But it's freaking awesome! I've spoken with a colleague who does this and I'd need to beef up my background in Economics/Statistics and/or Sociology. Not a problem - but a consideration to be sure. 


     


    - museum exhibit designer - This may seem out of left field, but it combines a lot of what I'm gifted with and is interesting. If I picked this, I'd not really know where to start, but it can't be that hard to figure out. 


     


    - Intern Whisperer - for want of a better term, I'm lumping my most entrepreneurial concept under that umbrella. I've toyed with the idea of starting a YouTube channel to offer advice to young professionals joining the real world. (Ironic considering I'm the one seeking advice now.) Everything from interview tips to productivity recommendations. From "learn from my fails" to "how to stand out from your colleagues." It might sound like those are obvious things, but in my years of working with interns, you'd be surprised. But it's a real joy working with them to see the proverbial lightbulb go off and to help them on their career paths. Beyond direct work with them, I might even provide intern program consulting to universities and companies looking to increase their millennial workforce. This one is so vague and I have no idea if a market even exists for it as to whether or not I'd actually be able to earn a living from it. 


     


    Phew. 


     


    Okay, hopefully that paints a clearer picture. Any and all thoughts are welcome. 


     


    Cheers,

    C


  • Star ChaserStar Chaser Powered by Shred
    This is going to be dodgy advice at best because this is my first time ever talking to you so obviously I know exactly what you need in your life right now. Nevertheless


    The logical perspective:


    Crisis media relations and PR for a company you care about can be persued immediately and concurrently. A great place to start would be to look for these jobs regardless of whether you will choose them in the end.


    I'll be honest with the dietician you'll hate 90% of it. Afterward you'll have to persue an education in functional medicine to really get into what you want to do.


    Big data seems like your best logical bet. You have a contact in the industry and software is pretty easy to find online and teach yourself these days. Could be the best fit from my incredibly narrow perspective.



    The less logical perspective:


    Maybe you need a complete 180 and the meusuem gig is for you?

    The question of to entrepreneur or not to entrepreneur is more a matter of your personality and what motivates you. Some people need a boss to provide that slight stress to keep their butt in gear, some don't.

    Chose the industry you can see yourself in for the next 10-20 years and chose the job that best suits you at this moment.

    I am a Video Game composer under the pseudonym Star Chaser.

    twitch.tv/starchaservgm (streaming most saturday and sunday nights EST)

    Guitarist:

    https://youtu.be/8L0SkovqEf4

    Next cover is Die by the Sword by Dragonforce.

    Music/Health/Biohacking Blog and Podcast currently under construction.

    Thanks to the internet, health experts, and my unending curiosity, I have overcome: excessive sweating (adrenal fatigue), anxiety and panic attacks, extremely high estrogen levels (man boobs), chronic brain fog (yeast overgrowth), depression, and am currently battling SIBO (took it from being so bloated it felt like my stomach skin was going to rip, slept 2 hours per night for a week because of upset stomach and being chronically fatigued to very mild, manageable but still annoying symptoms) and currently battling sleep deprivation/insomnia probably due to the SIBO/Leaky Gut and resulting histamine intolerance.

  • A year ago I left a 12 year career as a financial planner and started up a Motorcycle Training Company from nothing. I completely understand and feel where you are coming from. 


     


    From what you have written so far I get the feeling you are really corporate minded. The structure in your writing and skills will do well in any large corporation environment. If you are wanting to go the entrepreneurial route it takes a lot of patience and persistence to deal with the unorganization and procrastination of others. You must be absolutely consistent in your work ethic and approach to get the results. When starting new you will always be pushing the ball up the hill with no end in sight, it always feels this way. However, there will be moments of brilliance which make it all worth while. 


     


    What made me do the big switch is all the books I read.


     


    The 4 hour work week enabled me to think outside 'corporate box' and it also made me realize I would never be homeless if I screwed up badly. 


     


    The E Myth Revisted reminded me to run a business to what it needs not what I want


     


    The Willpower Instinct taught me about Moral Licensing and how we easily sabotage ourselves


     


    Finding Your Element encouraged me to make the change and just go for it


     


    To Sell is Human shows that we are always selling all the time. I am not a strong salesperson but I still need to have some basics.


     


    How to Make Millions with your Ideas and The Magic of Thinking Big were big motivators and I do refer to them for quick bursts of encouragement.


     


    Every book I read I made sure to highlight and bookmark (Kindle is great for this) so I can refer back to them. After reading the book you will forget 95% of it so it is nice to go back and get the good stuff that hit home for you.


     


    The education I received from reading the books mentioned above (and others) was far greater than any school I would have gone too. Add in Podcasts from great people (Dave Asprey, Tim Ferriss, Adam Carolla) and you really have everything to gain. Unless you go back to school for a focused and specific skill stick with the books and podcasts. 


     


    After a year making my changes I have no regrets and my business thrived. Had I stayed with my financial planning job I would have more money but I would be miserable. There are still huge challenges and stressful nights I'll deal with but they are very similar to what I had in the corporate life. My biggest challenges and threats I face today are still my income and savings. Even with a good first year I really don't know what 2015 will look like. I know if I keep doing what I am doing things will work out, I just won't get the instant reward. 


     


    Good luck and keep us posted on what you do. Change is GOOD. 


  • "The Entrepreneur Roller Coaster" by Darren Hardy.


  • Yeah data analysis ticks all the boxes - but either specialize or get out your textbook. You need to have a solid maths background to learn it and to be decent it would be best to have a background in your area(sociology/marketing for trends, some sort of health field for bioinformatics etc). then of course you would have to learn the software and how to program said math/statistics in that language, possibly r or python. If you want to be a leader in the field you need to know all these, the difference between a statistician and a good statistician.  Maths/calculus is the most essential, if you don't have these you have a long hill to climb almost regardless of talent. If you understand the statistics using a programming language will be pretty easy.


     


    Or maybe I'm misinterpeting and you intend to be the person coordinating the software engineers with marketers? Only asking as I had this mid-life crisis today when I found out how much work is in statistics. Readjusted my thinking to more of a 2-3 year plan down the line.




  •  


    For a basic background in what I already do - it's essentially project management and media relations for brands. I work with reporters and journalists to include my client's products in their stories. I've done this for luxury brands, tech brands, sporting goods, baby equipment and toys, non profits, pharma, local transportation.... and so on. 


     




     


     


    Oh, great. Native advertising. Yes, please quit and do anything else.

  • Sit down and think real hard about what you actually ENJOY doing.  Something you could burn away 10-12 hour days and it would feel like 4-6 hours.


     


    When you have found one (or two) things you actually enjoy, set aside 10 hours, chopped up as you need them, make a big pot of BPC, grab a pen and paper for note taking (or ipad, etc), and watch these nine episodes...(I'll link to episode 1 and the rest are nearby)


     



    Seeing through the chaotic.
  • bulletproof_alexbulletproof_alex Bulletproof Team Member

    I was in the PR/media relations world over a year ago. I realize now that it totally wasn't for me. You can do a lot more with PR experience than work in an agency or corporate setting.


     


    I'd recommend networking with the amazing startup community in Austin. You can seriously find something awesome and meaningful there. :)


     


    Good luck!


    Marketing Communications Coordinator | Bulletproof

  • I've just turned 30 and have been in the computer games industry for 10 years and these past few months I've come to realize i can't allow myself to be sat in an office any longer (nothing against this i'm just too sedentary for my own liking) . I'm starting a health coaching course next month and i'm already planning the business side of it and i'm SO excited. The 4 Hour Work Week and The One Thing are two books that have really sparked my interest in going forward and already have ideas beyond when i finish the course in a years time.


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