Kale Smoothie/shake Page 260

Just about to prepare Dave's kale recipe when I see the second ingredient is calcium carbonate. Is that a substance that people have in their kitchens? Isn't it Tums? Do you chefs out there I can just skip it?
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Comments

  • I would skip it, it's way too alkaline for most people anyway. 


  • You can steam the kale instead of using calcium. The think the calcium is used to bind to the oxalates. Steaming takes care of this.


  • ACH85ACH85 ✭✭
    edited December 2014


    Just about to prepare Dave's kale recipe when I see the second ingredient is calcium carbonate. Is that a substance that people have in their kitchens? Isn't it Tums? Do you chefs out there I can just skip it?




     




    I would skip it, it's way too alkaline for most people anyway. 




     




    You can steam the kale instead of using calcium. The think the calcium is used to bind to the oxalates. Steaming takes care of this.




     


     


    I would not (and do not) skip it. As piehole mentioned, the downsides of kale are that it contains oaxalic acid and goitrogens. Goitrogens slow your thyroid, and oaxalic acid is the material that 80% of kidney stones are made out of, and can also cause painful sex in women and muscle pain in everyone. Calcium carbonate is an easy-to-find supplement (CVS/Walgreens, supermarkets, wherever, it's just find a supplement that says "calcium" on the bottle and then check the ingredients list to confirm the form) that binds to the oaxalic acid when you blend everything together. 


     


    Steaming (and then draining) the kale does reduce oaxalic acid, but not entirely. That's why the recipe on p.260 calls for steaming the kale AND adding calcium carbonate. 1 bunch of kale, eaten on a regular basis, is a lot of kale, which is why it's worth hacking. 


     


     


    If you want to try the recipe without the calcium to see if you'll like taste, that's no big deal. But if this becomes a regularly-consumed recipe for you, get the calcium. After all, you can probably pick it up at the supermarket while you buy your kale. Dave wrote about the problems with kale and calcium loading in-depth here


  • NickatNickat
    edited December 2014
    97% decrease in oxalate!

    No brainer, do the hack.

    Great reference, uber cool advice.

    Don't forget to add the magnesium oxide supplement too, it's all in the link :-)
  • Yep, I'd been throwing in more expensive mag glycinate (since that's what I had on hand for use before bed) but recently bought cheap mag oxide specifically for green smoothies.


     


    mag oxide: great for binding oaxalates and generating profit for supplement companies, crappy for everything else


  • NickatNickat
    edited December 2014
    We buy lots of eggs for cooking and of course THE ice cream. Yeah I know we could buy the organic liquid egg whites and the separated egg yokes but then that doesn't give us the egg shells and it`s more expensive anyway.

    The benefits of the having the egg shell means we can get homemade calcium from the egg too:


    We just wash the shells in warm water to remove the remnants of the egg whites and to give the outer eggshell a good clean. This is where salmonella from chicken feces may be a problem if you have your own hen laying eggs.
    (Shop bought eggs now have stringent cleaning procedures in place before being sold and should be washed all the same to remove any detergent or sanitisation material).


    You can keep the membrane in the egg as it contains nutritional benefits too. Leave overnight to dry on a baking tray. Then bake at 200F for ten minutes killing more bacterial nasties.

    Once that's done we use our coffee grinder to bring them to a course calcium powder. You might want to use a pestle and mortar.


    Do that a few times and it soon builds a steady supply that can be kept in a jar and added to things like kale when cooked. It`s a great source of cooking calcium and one tsp is supposed to give a strength of between 800-1000 mg.

    Add it to cook your kale and don't forget the recommended cheap magnesium oxide :wink: 97% decrease in oxalate is a beautiful thing.

    Lastly a warning: Don`t be tempted to add too much calcium in this form as it could cause stomach upsets. Just add 3/4 tsp or less and work from there.
  • So, I just tried this recipes (including the calcium carbonate). I expected it to be gross but it was pretty damn good.




  • So, I just tried this recipes (including the calcium carbonate). I expected it to be gross but it was pretty damn good.




     


    Kale actually gives me acne over time, so from experience I can tell you chard (green, red, and rainbow) is also really good. Brussels sprouts are OK in moderation, but get a little sour if you add too many. Collard greens are pretty rough. I still steam and add cal/mag with all of those. 


     


    Rotating veggies is a good idea, especially if you eat large amounts like in a smoothie. 

  • Ended up buying Kal Bone Meal for the calcium carbonate. It has some mag as well. Just made the smoothie and it tasted great. The fresh oregano is wonderful in it. I did need to add water to the recipe as it was practically solid.


    Thanks for all the replies!
  • Season10Season10 Trying to survive

    I have calcium carb but it is powder form.  Dave said throw a pill in the mix....well my calcium is 1/8 Teaspoon  equal to 667 milligrams.  What would be the dosage for the Kale shake? 


    Life begins at the end of your comfort zone



  • I have calcium carb but it is powder form.  Dave said throw a pill in the mix....well my calcium is 1/8 Teaspoon  equal to 667 milligrams.  What would be the dosage for the Kale shake? 




     


    "1 bunch kale" = 500mg calcium carbonate. So add a bit of kale, or go a little less than a full 1/8tsp. Though I wouldn't really worry about getting that completely precise. 

  • I just made the kale smoothie, it was not a success. i will probably chuck it because it tastes awful.


     


    It is soooo salty.  really 1 tsp of salt?


     


    how much is a "bunch of Kale" like the whole bunch that I buy at the grocery store or a bunch that I can fit in my hand?


     


    the calcium/magnesium he recommends? the CALM stuff thats all bubbly and barely drinkable with water? 


     


    I even boiled the kale first added an egg because i don't have octane or collagen right now.


     


    please help. I want and need to eat more greens for energy and mental focus but this smoothie recipe did not succeed for me.


     


     




  • It is soooo salty.  really 1 tsp of salt?


     


    how much is a "bunch of Kale" like the whole bunch that I buy at the grocery store or a bunch that I can fit in my hand?


     


    the calcium/magnesium he recommends? the CALM stuff thats all bubbly and barely drinkable with water? 


     


    I even boiled the kale first added an egg because i don't have octane or collagen right now.


     


    please help. I want and need to eat more greens for energy and mental focus but this smoothie recipe did not succeed for me.




     


    Recipe calls for "sea salt to taste." Not sure where you're getting the 1tsp, but anyway I often don't bother with salt. 


     


    Not sure exactly what a bunch is, but you can use a lot. 


     


    Not the natural calm. The cal and mag is only designed to bind stuff, so you can use cheap stuff you find in the supermarket vitamin section. Just look for ~500mg calcium carbonate, ~500mg magnesium oxide. I use 2 200mg mag oxide tablets, it's what I found at Whole Foods. 


     


    There is a thread here called "vegetables in smoothies" which will give you ideas for how to blend more veggies into your life.

  • Thank yo ACH85 for taking the time to help. i will check out that thread and buy some cal and mag.  :-P


  • I saw this on the Bulletproof Fanpage today, someone posted the link:


     


    http://betterhealthx.com/are-oxalates-in-kale-harming-us


     


    Looks we have gut bacteria and liver enzymes that naturally digest oxalates.   And all sorts of foods - sweet potatoes, brewed coffee and even dark chocolate is high in oxalates.  Cooking doesn't do much either to reduce oxalate contents.  


     


    Says it's better to worry about leaky gut, which is probably contributing to the problem with oxalates in the blood.

    --

     

    Michael Stone

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