Sauerkraut

Hi all,


 


Is anybody out there making their own homemade pro-biotic foods such as Sauerkraut? -- Would love to hear everyone's approach to this as the only BP risk I'm assuming would be with mold.....


Comments

  • Yes! I am new to this forum, so I have yet to read about Kombucha. I would like to know about both sauerkraut and kombucha.


  • I've made both sauerkraut and kombucha many times. I've never once encountered mold. Just wash your hands and utensils well, use clean towels, ect. Both are dead simple to make.


     


    For sauerkraut I use mason jars. One head of cabbage is roughly two standard mason jars. Weigh the cabbage and set aside 2 teaspoons of sea salt for every pound of cabbage. Cut up the cabbage as finely as you can and add it to a large bowl. Sprinkle the salt on top and with very clean hands, crunch the cabbage between your fingers for a few minutes until the salt extracts enough water from the cabbage so that it drips as you pick it up. Pack the mixture into your mason jars as well as you can. Seal the jar and set it aside. Each morning crack it open briefly to relieve pressure. Wait at least a week before putting it in the fridge. I've found 2 weeks to be best for an ambient temperature ~ 68-70 F. In warmer clients you would need less time. 


     


    For kombucha I recommend growing your own scoby / starter from store bought kombucha. The GT brand works if you buy the original alcoholic formulation. You'll want to use the plain variety -- no added fruit juices or ginger. Brew 2 cups of green tea (w/ 2 tea bags) and steep for 10 minutes. Add 2 tbsp of sugar. Add to a 1 gallon glass jar. Let it cool to room temperature. Add the store bought kombucha and cover the opening with a clean cloth and rubber band. Let it sit for 2 weeks. Placing it on top of a germination mat can help speed things along. Once the scoby is grown, follow these instructions for making a full batch of kombucha. 


     


    http://communitea-kombucha.com/recipe-for-making-kombucha/

    My personal blog : healthbydiet.net



  • I've made both sauerkraut and kombucha many times. I've never once encountered mold. Just wash your hands and utensils well, use clean towels, ect. Both are dead simple to make.


     


    For sauerkraut I use mason jars. One head of cabbage is roughly two standard mason jars. Weigh the cabbage and set aside 2 teaspoons of sea salt for every pound of cabbage. Cut up the cabbage as finely as you can and add it to a large bowl. Sprinkle the salt on top and with very clean hands, crunch the cabbage between your fingers for a few minutes until the salt extracts enough water from the cabbage so that it drips as you pick it up. Pack the mixture into your mason jars as well as you can. Seal the jar and set it aside. Each morning crack it open briefly to relieve pressure. Wait at least a week before putting it in the fridge. I've found 2 weeks to be best for an ambient temperature ~ 68-70 F. In warmer clients you would need less time. 


     


    For kombucha I recommend growing your own scoby / starter from store bought kombucha. The GT brand works if you buy the original alcoholic formulation. You'll want to use the plain variety -- no added fruit juices or ginger. Brew 2 cups of green tea (w/ 2 tea bags) and steep for 10 minutes. Add 2 tbsp of sugar. Add to a 1 gallon glass jar. Let it cool to room temperature. Add the store bought kombucha and cover the opening with a clean cloth and rubber band. Let it sit for 2 weeks. Placing it on top of a germination mat can help speed things along. Once the scoby is grown, follow these instructions for making a full batch of kombucha. 


     


    http://communitea-kombucha.com/recipe-for-making-kombucha/




     


     


    Thanks so much for this! I'm assuming Himalayan salt will work as well? So in the meantime (before 1 week) is it best to just keep somewhere cooler without light like a basement? Secondly, do you open to crack the pressure everyday? Any need to keep pushing the contents down under the brine on a daily basis as well? Lastly, what's the standard timeframe of fermentation so that I know it's in the ready range?



  • Thanks so much for this! I'm assuming Himalayan salt will work as well? So in the meantime (before 1 week) is it best to just keep somewhere cooler without light like a basement? Secondly, do you open to crack the pressure everyday? Any need to keep pushing the contents down under the brine on a daily basis as well? Lastly, what's the standard timeframe of fermentation so that I know it's in the ready range?




     


    Traditionally they don't complete seal the container the Sauekraut is stored in, that is it is relately open to the environment.


     


    I am not a fan of leaving it open to environment, so pesonally I use Mason jars, and just leave the seal off the lid. This way the kraut is sealed from the direct environment, and the gases are free to escape.


     


    It should also be noted that kraut is very high Histamines, so go slow if you have never consumed before, just in case you have a reaction.


     

    My personal recipe is to finely slice up 1 head of cabbage, and add in other vegetables such as carrot, beetroot etc. Place everything in a large bowl and sprinkle 2 tsp of Himalayan Sea salt over the top. Lightly mix, then let it stand for 10 minutes. After that, spend  5-10 minutes crunch it in your hands to breakdown down the fibres and to help the vege's release their juice. It should reduce in volume by 50%. Tightly pack into Mason jar, forcing it down with your fingers. Pour any remaining juice from bowl into Jar. There should be a small layer of juice over the top of the kraut. If not add in a small amount of distilled water (not tap water) . Place 1 outer leaf  from the cabbage over the top. Leave for 1 week or longer. 1 week I find is the sweet spot for my tastes
  • Yes, Himalayan salt should be fine. I just use sea salt because I have a ton of it laying around. A basement might be too cool. I do open slightly to release some pressure every day. Be careful as some brine may shoot out. If it does, you may need to add a little distilled or RO water so that the cabbage is covered. You shouldn't need to push the contents down. I wouldn't consume the kraut before 1 week. 


     


     




    Thanks so much for this! I'm assuming Himalayan salt will work as well? So in the meantime (before 1 week) is it best to just keep somewhere cooler without light like a basement? Secondly, do you open to crack the pressure everyday? Any need to keep pushing the contents down under the brine on a daily basis as well? Lastly, what's the standard timeframe of fermentation so that I know it's in the ready range?



    My personal blog : healthbydiet.net



  • Yes, Himalayan salt should be fine. I just use sea salt because I have a ton of it laying around. A basement might be too cool. I do open slightly to release some pressure every day. Be careful as some brine may shoot out. If it does, you may need to add a little distilled or RO water so that the cabbage is covered. You shouldn't need to push the contents down. I wouldn't consume the kraut before 1 week. 




     


     


    My house usually sits at 70 degrees throughout the day and I kick it down to 65 for bed. Would this still prove too cold in the basement?


     


    Right now I have three jars, was thinking it would be a good schedule to let one ferment for a week, bring it to the fridge, let it continue fermenting in there for another week and eat it over the course of a week as well. -- The other 2 could ferment and keep  a cycle going, so that way I'd constantly have a rotation of 2-3 week fermented jars eventually hitting my fridge on a consistent basis.

  • If the basement is 65-70 then it would be ok. Usually when I think basement I think 55-60, which may be too cold. 


     


     




    My house usually sits at 70 degrees throughout the day and I kick it down to 65 for bed. Would this still prove too cold in the basement?


     


    Right now I have three jars, was thinking it would be a good schedule to let one ferment for a week, bring it to the fridge, let it continue fermenting in there for another week and eat it over the course of a week as well. -- The other 2 could ferment and keep  a cycle going, so that way I'd constantly have a rotation of 2-3 week fermented jars eventually hitting my fridge on a consistent basis.



    My personal blog : healthbydiet.net

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