Coconut Oil, Coconut Cream, Estrogenic Pollutants, Hunger

I've mentioned before that the staple of my diet was coconut cream, and I think also that, being leery of the canned stuff and no time to make from scratch, I was pleased to find this no-additive coconut cream in Tetra Pak. http://www.amazon.com/AROY-D-Coconut-Cream-package-3-pack/dp/B008ZWILNS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1425786673&sr=8-1&keywords=aroy-d+coconut+cream


I've also shared I try to get away with fewest calories possible and seek to hack hunger/cravings.


 


So, an interesting development on several fronts. The little voice in the back of my head saying I liked the coconut cream a bit too much sent me investigating Tetra Pak. I wrote about what I found in detail here, but in short, the liner of the carton is PET plastic.


 


I won't drink out of PET plastic water bottles because of their estrogenic effects, and here I was getting the bulk of my calories from something in contact with it, and coconut's mostly fat, which is where environmental toxins accumulate!! Let alone, in order to get the coconut cream out homogeneously to pour into glass jars, I had to warm it up. Yeah, hot PET. Great.


 


OMG. So, that had to stop being my staple.


This may sound woo-woo, but next day I muscle-tested the coconut cream, as well as all my other coconut products (coconut oils, coconut butter, shredded coconut). I tested strong to everything except the coconut cream in Tetra Pak and some old coconut oil I don't consume. I swear I wasn't faking it; I surprised myself, and I tested a bunch of other things too that I had no expectations of result on.


 


Second interesting thing: how to replace it? I was having a half cup, about 200 calories, as the basis of each of my two daily smoothies. This past week, I've been having instead 200-ish cals' worth of a combination of coconut oil, mct oil, and sunflower lecithin.


 


And guess what? Although my weight hasn't yet gone down (I'm trying to go from 89 to 86lb; was there three weeks ago and dunno why it went back up), my hunger is mostly gone! Until I stopped the coconut cream, I never experienced what so many talk about with the bulletproof coffee, that they can have their bulletproof coffee and not be urgent for lunch. So fascinating, because my bulletproof coffee itself hasn't changed at all, and in the order of the day it comes first. So what I haven't-yet-had for lunch is affecting my hunger in the morning! 


 


So basically I switched from coconut cream--a fat base with a little incidental carb/protein--to a pure fat base. 

The next part of the experiment: try coconut butter, which has the carb/protein of coconut cream plus quite a bit of fiber. On one hand I'm really curious to see whether the hunger difference was because of the toxins or because of the macronutrients; on the other, I like it so well this way I almost don't want to mess.


 


What do you guys think? The fat or the estrogen?


Comments

  • Sorry, wait, you only weight 89 lbs? How old are you?


     


     


     




    I've mentioned before that the staple of my diet was coconut cream, and I think also that, being leery of the canned stuff and no time to make from scratch, I was pleased to find this no-additive coconut cream in Tetra Pak. http://www.amazon.com/AROY-D-Coconut-Cream-package-3-pack/dp/B008ZWILNS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1425786673&sr=8-1&keywords=aroy-d+coconut+cream


    I've also shared I try to get away with fewest calories possible and seek to hack hunger/cravings.


     


    So, an interesting development on several fronts. The little voice in the back of my head saying I liked the coconut cream a bit too much sent me investigating Tetra Pak. I wrote about what I found in detail here, but in short, the liner of the carton is PET plastic.


     


    I won't drink out of PET plastic water bottles because of their estrogenic effects, and here I was getting the bulk of my calories from something in contact with it, and coconut's mostly fat, which is where environmental toxins accumulate!! Let alone, in order to get the coconut cream out homogeneously to pour into glass jars, I had to warm it up. Yeah, hot PET. Great.


     


    OMG. So, that had to stop being my staple.


    This may sound woo-woo, but next day I muscle-tested the coconut cream, as well as all my other coconut products (coconut oils, coconut butter, shredded coconut). I tested strong to everything except the coconut cream in Tetra Pak and some old coconut oil I don't consume. I swear I wasn't faking it; I surprised myself, and I tested a bunch of other things too that I had no expectations of result on.


     


    Second interesting thing: how to replace it? I was having a half cup, about 200 calories, as the basis of each of my two daily smoothies. This past week, I've been having instead 200-ish cals' worth of a combination of coconut oil, mct oil, and sunflower lecithin.


     


    And guess what? Although my weight hasn't yet gone down (I'm trying to go from 89 to 86lb; was there three weeks ago and dunno why it went back up), my hunger is mostly gone! Until I stopped the coconut cream, I never experienced what so many talk about with the bulletproof coffee, that they can have their bulletproof coffee and not be urgent for lunch. So fascinating, because my bulletproof coffee itself hasn't changed at all, and in the order of the day it comes first. So what I haven't-yet-had for lunch is affecting my hunger in the morning! 


     


    So basically I switched from coconut cream--a fat base with a little incidental carb/protein--to a pure fat base. 

    The next part of the experiment: try coconut butter, which has the carb/protein of coconut cream plus quite a bit of fiber. On one hand I'm really curious to see whether the hunger difference was because of the toxins or because of the macronutrients; on the other, I like it so well this way I almost don't want to mess.


     


    What do you guys think? The fat or the estrogen?



    My personal blog : healthbydiet.net

  • BPA is a softener, to make plastics flexible. Bpa leaks both to air and water. We are exposed to BPA via many pathways, all kinds of plastic in home and office, cosmetics, paint, clothing and whatnot. In the body BPA quickly breaks down. If you measure bpa in the body, you measure THROUGHPUT, because if exposure stops, your body will get rid of it fast enough. It is not easy to make your house totally free, but it can be done, as is demonstrated by people with MCS (multiple chemical sensitivity). These people lack sufficient detox capacities and have become intolerant to a great many substances. If you want a clean personal environment, check out their websites.

    Now, industry has come up with BPA-free plastics. Zero estrogenic activity, or so they say. Just google bpa-free plastics, and be unsurprised that the so-called bpa-free plastics are often more hazardous than the regular materials. If you wAnt to be on the safe side, stick to plastic-free: glass, porcelain and stainless steel.

    Or find ways for your body to deal with unavoidable pseudo-estrogens, supplement with iodine for starters. Too much avoidance and lack of sufficient carbs in your diet might induce hypersensitivities.
  • Thanks, Maureen, that's a good primer/refresh on BPA. 


    But what I was talking about was PET, which is even worse than BPA. My story was kind of an "out of the frying pan, into the fire" story, since I thought I was avoiding chemical pollutants by using Tetra Pak instead of cans, but actually Tetra Pak is lined with PET.


     


    HealthByDiet, I just turned 38. I've weighed a lot less than this in my adult life; also quite a bit more at one brief period. I'm hacking the scenario so that when I've lost 3-4lbs right now, I can get into a more easeful maintenance. 


     


    I would love to work with a good metabolic practitioner who would help me figure out exactly what I need to do. But I'm aware that it'll be very hard to find a practitioner willing to help me lose weight (although I'm only 5ft4 so I'm not really that thin).


  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    What's the stuff (plastics?) generally used to line cans...is that PET, or something else

    fake it till you make it

  • The stuff generally used to line cans is the BPA. The "BPA-free" substitute is something other than PET, but I don't know offhand what it's called, only that it's not very well studied and that some studies suggest it's no better than BPA itself.


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