11 Year Old, Poor Sleep And Adhd

Hi,


My son has been diagnosed with the inattentive form of ADHD. We have tried concerta and Adderal. Each has proven ineffective. It seems he has insomnia and anxiety. His new psychiatrist is very open minded. He suggested L-Theinine which has helped his sleep, however, his inattentiveness is still a major problem. His insomnia has seemed to increase due to our other sons epilepsy which has become more pronounced. i have a feeling his limbic system is primed for threat response and he is completely stressed out. I have heard the l-tyrosine works well for people who have been through stress. Does any one in the forum have experience with this supplement?


 


Thanks for your time,


Mike


Comments

  • GarrettGarrett
    edited March 2015

    When you say ADHD... could you clarify what you mean?


    ADHD is a very very broad term, usually put on people & kids that the regular school system / 'general society' doesn't really understand / can't deal with. 


    What does he ENJOY doing? What is his natural proclivity for activities? Does he just have a robust amount of energy? Is he sports inclined? Is he bodily-kinaesthetic? If he has a lot of energy, is he being given ample outlets for that energy? Or is he being forced to sit still, and focus on 1 thing in front of him, thus making his energy build up inside, and overflow at night?


     


    And when you say 'Inattentiveness', does that mean that he's being given things that he finds absolutely boring, and would rather not be doing, because it's not how his brain works? Has he tapped into say... art? or a movement practice (yoga, dance, Tai Chi / Qi Gong,  weight training, whatnot)?


     


    Just things to consider.


     


    Also, what's his electronics usage like? And does he have a draw towards electronics?


    What's he eating, as well?


    And are you giving him warm Epsom Salt baths, in order to calm his nervous system? 


     


    As you can tell, I have strong feelings towards the ADHD label....




    Hi,


    My son has been diagnosed with the inattentive form of ADHD. We have tried concerta and Adderal. Each has proven ineffective. It seems he has insomnia and anxiety. His new psychiatrist is very open minded. He suggested L-Theinine which has helped his sleep, however, his inattentiveness is still a major problem. His insomnia has seemed to increase due to our other sons epilepsy which has become more pronounced. i have a feeling his limbic system is primed for threat response and he is completely stressed out. I have heard the l-tyrosine works well for people who have been through stress. Does any one in the forum have experience with this supplement?


     


    Thanks for your time,


    Mike



  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited March 2015
    I could be reading it wrong Garrett, but I think Mike did narrow down the adhd type,

    the dx is 'inattentive adhd' (google 'knows' it)

    fake it till you make it

  • GarrettGarrett
    edited March 2015
    “Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid. (or inattentive)” ― Albert Einstein. Albert was labelled as 'stupid' and 'slow' when he was in his early years of school. Became one of the world's most profound geniuses.

     


    Inattentive ADHD is so broad. What does that actually mean. WHY is he inattentive? In what scenarios is he inattentive? Then, one might ask, in what scenarios is he laser focused? Because there are some. I know there are. 


     


    It's like saying that Bruce Lee ought to have sat down and been doing math work, when clearly his forte was martial arts. 


    Inattentive ADHD might just mean that, hey, whatever the kid is being forced to do is probably NOT something that his brain is wired to be doing. Maybe instead of labels, they might want to consider talking to the kid, and find out what he likes. He might be SUPER gifted in sports, but is being forced to do linear work in school, which his brain does not work well with. Maybe he's great at music. Maybe he's great at art. At computer programming. Maybe writing. Maybe building stuff with his hands. 


    By the way, I just read webmd's definition of 'inattentive ADHD'. And had a chuckle. The kid doesn't have any problems. He doesn't have "Inattentive ADHD". Figure him out. Figure out how he learns, and what his talents are. There's NOTHING to fix. He's not broken. He has hidden talents that will blow everyone out of the water. Don't try to "FIX" Him.


     


    PS - The kid is probably going to be a shining entrepreneur, and will be phenomenal at delegating. Jussayin'. Get him into a visionary-esque role. That's where he'll shine. He's wired to shake things up.


     


    By the way, Anthony Hopkins, one of the greatest actors of all time, was labeled "Problem Child" when he was younger, because the terms "ADHD" and "Dyslexia" weren't invented. http://www.success.com/article/anthony-hopkins-the-oscar-winner-finds-his-place-in-the-sun Your kid might even shine as an actor. 


     


    And Richard Branson (Multi-billionaire + owner of the entire Virgin company) has Dyslexia. 


     




    I could be reading it wrong Garrett, but I think Mike did narrow down the adhd type,

    the dx is 'inattentive adhd' (google 'knows' it)



  • I'm in the same situation with one of my sons. "Figure him out" reply doesn't help anyone. What do you think he is doing by posting to this? He is trying to find ways to help his child. Ds and Cs in half the classes and As in the others is fustrating both the child, parent and teacher.

    I think your taking the right approach by treating the anxiety first. Consider trying a B complex, zinc, and magnesium. I'm searching for answers as well. My son was recently prescribed Gaba and that helped with the anxiety as well. Are you looking for supplements? Have you tried meditation with him?
  • "Figure him out" does help. Listening to the child, finding out what his areas of focus & passion are, and honing in on those. Do you think Picasso would've done well at Baseball? He probably would've wanted to go off to paint. 


     


    Valid questions are - What classes is he getting D's and C's in, and what classes is he getting A's in? What type of work is stimulating for him? What does the child like to do in his spare time? In what areas does he laser focus?  Does he do well in a quiet environment? Or a more active one? Are there electronics on around him when he's working on concentrating? I have ADHD tendencies if there are tons of distractions in my environment, as well. That's not uncommon.


     


    Also remember, the schools are NOT built for people of various personality types.



    I do agree with meditation :)


     




    I'm in the same situation with one of my sons. "Figure him out" reply doesn't help anyone. What do you think he is doing by posting to this? He is trying to find ways to help his child. Ds and Cs in half the classes and As in the others is fustrating both the child, parent and teacher.

    I think your taking the right approach by treating the anxiety first. Consider trying a B complex, zinc, and magnesium. I'm searching for answers as well. My son was recently prescribed Gaba and that helped with the anxiety as well. Are you looking for supplements? Have you tried meditation with him?



  • RekaReka ✭✭✭
    edited April 2015

    I don't know how the school system is over there, but here it is completely useless for life. I received very good grades in everything yet I hated school, and there was no occasion in my life when I needed any of the information they taught there. School is designed to make kids miserable and set them up to hate their jobs later (and this worked for me, unfortunately :grin: ). Why not focus on the things he is good at? He will probably never need the things he is not good at because nobody can excel in everything later in life. At least he has good grades in certain stuff, which means he is probably a bright kid.


     


    I mean, of course, use the supplements and meditation and make him eat healthy, but putting him under extra stress is counterproductive.


    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

  • Exactly! Focus on the areas he likes & excels in! Build on his strengths. 


    And if he's 'hyper-active' while sitting... maybe he oughta be using his body. There might just be an athlete there. ;) 




    I don't know how the school system is over there, but here it is completely useless for life. I received very good grades in everything yet I hated school, and there was no occasion in my life when I needed any of the information they taught there. School is designed to make kids miserable and set them up to hate their jobs later (and this worked for me, unfortunately :grin: ). Why not focus on the things he is good at? He will probably never need the things he is not good at because nobody can excel in everything later in life. At least he has good grades in certain stuff, which means he is probably a bright kid.


     


    I mean, of course, use the supplements and meditation and make him eat healthy, but putting him under extra stress is counterproductive.



  • @baldninja said:
    Hi,

    My son has been diagnosed with the inattentive form of ADHD. We have tried concerta and Adderal. Each has proven ineffective. It seems he has insomnia and anxiety. His new psychiatrist is very open minded. He suggested L-Theinine which has helped his sleep, however, his inattentiveness is still a major problem. His insomnia has seemed to increase due to our other sons epilepsy which has become more pronounced. i have a feeling his limbic system is primed for threat response and he is completely stressed out. I have heard the l-tyrosine works well for people who have been through stress. Does any one in the forum have experience with this supplement?

     

    Thanks for your time,

    Mike

    Hi @Mike,

    We have a different response to the medicine, you better ask your son's psychiatrist. And try to read blogs about children and ADHD.

  • I can advice Pantogam:
    It contains Hopantenic acid 10%

    Indications:

    • Hyperkinetic disorders (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) in children;
    • neurosis-like conditions (with stuttering, mainly in clonic form, tics) in children
    • cognitive impairment and neurotic disorders;
    • schizophrenia with cerebral organic insufficiency;
    • cerebrovascular insufficiency caused by atherosclerotic changes in cerebral vessels;
    • extrapyramidal disorders (myoclonus-epilepsy, Huntington's chorea, hepatolenticular degeneration, Parkinson's disease, etc.);
      treatment and prevention of extrapyramidal syndrome (hyperkinetic and akinetic), caused by the intake of neuroleptics;

    • epilepsy with delayed mental processes in complex therapy with anticonvulsants;

    • psycho-emotional overload;
    • decreased mental and physical performance, to improve concentration and memorization;
    • neurogenic disorders of urination (pollakiuria, imperative urges, mandatory urinary incontinence, enuresis).
    • mental retardation of varying degrees in children;
    • delay in development (mental, speech, motor, or combination of them) in children;
    • various forms of infantile cerebral palsy;
  • Hi baldninja,
    I know it's been a while but since your son and I share the same form of ADHD (inattentive type) I thought I let you know that I also had very bad side effects from medication. (Especially insomnia like your son).... The psychiatrist never understood what's going on until years later I went to a cardiologist and found out I have a fast heart rate and that's why all that time the ADHD meds (which are all stimulating) would make me worst. They would make my heart rate go even faster and I could not sleep for 3 days in a row!..... It got to a point where I simply gave up and just lived with my ADHD until a few months ago where I came across Neurofeedback and I am currently starting treatments. This may be an option for your son as well because it does not involve medication.

  • CBD

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