Zen Tech Screen Protectors

Any thoughts or opinions on the new Zen Tech screen protectors. If I am not mistaken these are not the type of protectors that turn your screen orange but yet they somehow block blue light wavelengths. This seems fishy to me and I'd love to see some testimonials and / or science on them.


Comments

  • NickatNickat
    edited April 2015
    The Zen tech screen protector is possibly aimed at those that don`t want the untainted yellow look (yellow absorbs blue light) and still have the properties of ophthalmic lenses in spectacles. The technology of coating lenses has been around for some time already, particularly for blocking blue light and ultraviolet light. The blue light falls between the ranges of 380 to 500nm wavelengths and the ultraviolet range falls below that. The Zen tech blocks up to 84% of ultra violet so not all the ultraviolet can be presumed to be adequately increased in the reflection of blue light. The brightness of your screen can also affect the blue light blocking properties. Unlike f.lux, a natural and transparent look to your screen enables it to retain a natural image. Maybe that is what made you think something fishy might be at play?

    For further explanation on lens coating technology that might be used in the Zen tech look here: http://nikon.com/about/technology/life/others/bluelightcut/index.htm
    This is a cheap alternative to lens coating your screen for sure.

    The added advantage of using this product is that it can easily be placed on Iphone, Ipad and Macbook pro`s without needing any Jailbird hacks that are required to instal f.lux. That might obsolete any warranty or insurance if something later went wrong with it. Hope that helps some. We were interested too.
  • ACH85ACH85 ✭✭

    OK, so I understand how these things work without changing the color of the screen: they block more UV than blue. 


     



     


     


    • Zen Tech blocks at least 28% of blue light
    • Zen Tech blocks at least 84% of ultraviolet light 
    • Does not change screen color
    • Retains the natural images on your screen

     


    So, does this mean all this stuff we've learned about blue light messing with our circadian rhythm actually applies more to UV than to blue? Dave is selling these things as a late-night screen cheat that still lets you sleep, but if up to 72% of blue light gets through, surely blue must not be the most problematic wavelength... 


     


    ...if this is true, can I conversely use UV light to wake myself up in the morning and/or reset my circadian rhythm? 


  • NickatNickat
    edited April 2015


    OK, so I understand how these things work without changing the color of the screen: they block more UV than blue. 


     


     


    So, does this mean all this stuff we've learned about blue light messing with our circadian rhythm actually applies more to UV than to blue? Dave is selling these things as a late-night screen cheat that still lets you sleep, but if up to 72% of blue light gets through, surely blue must not be the most problematic wavelength... 


     


    ...if this is true, can I conversely use UV light to wake myself up in the morning and/or reset my circadian rhythm? 




     


    Interesting. Blue light is different from all other forms of light because one`s body is able to distinguish the difference between day or night because of its wavelength. We always thought the effective wavelengths could only be seen in short blue light and not UV as an optimal reset for circadian rhythm for wake up. UV being less distinguishable as a wake up band wavelength even though it of course is present in natural daylight. We are currently using red LED at night that emit almost no UV light (red, green and blue giving white light mostly rather than UV). It would seem logical to use a fuller spectrum wavelength to wake up to for the circadian rhythm reset (like sunshine)  and this would include UV as the source of light. 


    You could try solely using a UV light bulb and let us know ACH? :wink: Blocking UV rather than blue light on the Zen Tech would seem easier although not necessarily as effective as say blocking more blue light would be on f.lux  https://justgetflux.com/research.html


    Maybe using white LED lights and not blue would be a better way to wake up and reset the circadian rhythm? Anyone have thoughts on that?


  • I am glad this discussion is getting rolling here. I just wish Dave would have released some additional explanation as to why he is selling this product when in the release article it says even small amounts of blue light can disturb sleep and then the article states percentages less than 100% of blue light being blocked. Seems odd to me.
  • I am glad this discussion is getting rolling here. I just wish Dave would have released some additional explanation as to why he is selling this product when in the release article it says even small amounts of blue light can disturb sleep and then the article states percentages less than 100% of blue light being blocked. Seems odd to me.




    Yes at least 28% doesn't seem like a lot does it.
  • ACH85ACH85 ✭✭

    From the email:


     



     


     


    Because thanks to new technology from Japan, you can cut your exposure to sleep-robbing blue light by up to 99% without powering down your computer or your phone.

     


    The plot thickens. Would love some clarification from the BP people on this. 


     


    Perhaps it varies by device, or certainly screen brightness setting?


     


    If I could know for sure this stuff worked better than f.lux, I'd have no problem paying for the phone and 15" macbook versions. I don't mind f.lux if it kicks in when I'm away from my computer, but if I notice it kick in I can't stand the color and tend to snooze it for an hour. 


  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited April 2015
    just on the blocking UV bit...do mobile/flat screen displays even emit much/anything in the way of UV...?


    just thinking out loud...have not had a google yet or checked if listed in any manufacturers specs

    fake it till you make it

  • NickatNickat
    edited April 2015


    just on the blocking UV bit...do mobile/flat


    screen displays even emit much/anything in the way of UV...?

    just thinking out loud...have not had a google yet or checked if listed in any manufacturers specs


    Like your thinking. Surely UV protection works the other way round by stopping the UV from sunshine to that of hitting your screen?
  • I just wear my $6 blue-blocker glasses at night and they work for every screen. No need to buy a screen protector like this IMO.


  • NickatNickat
    edited April 2015


    I just wear my $6 blue-blocker glasses at night and they work for every screen. No need to buy a screen protector like this IMO.




     


    Whether by blue-blocker glasses or a program such as f.lux (although there are many others), they work by changing either the hue or the brightness (or both). Zen Tech implies that that it will retain a natural viewing experience by changing neither. It then describes that their results might vary because of brightness or hue on the screen settings on the device you are using and that may making it less effective. There is added confusion when it describes UV wavelength protection. Most screens use diodes that generate very little UV. The UV protection being talked about might actually be about exposure of UV onto the screen as opposed to the protection from it. That would make far better sense.  Personally we think screen size should be paid far greater attention. If you're using a smaller screen (phone), then this will be better than a larger screen (tablet etc…) because there is less area to project blue light (dimmer and less of it) to the onlooker in the dark hours anyway. The real issue is does Zen Tech give use comparable protection while retaining a natural viewing image or not and can this be effectively measured?


  • So has anyone tried one of these yet? The reviews don't make it sound very promising, and the whole "block blue light without blocking blue light" approach doesn't make any sense to me.


    I got a new iPhone and if this thing actually works and doesn't suck I'd buy it probably.
  • StevoStevo Upgrade in Progress

    Sadly, these screen covers remind me of The Emperor's New Clothes. 


  • katolotuskatolotus ✭✭✭

    Just got mine, as I wanted a screen protector too. I got stung on the postage to the UK. Gives US postage, then once I pressed order with a UK address, it changed the amount after completing the order, so turned out an expensive purchase, so better work!


     


    I tend to be wearing orange glasses in the evening anyhow, but this is just extra protection. The actual physical product seems pretty good for a screen protector, although literally just fitted it, so we'll see how it wears. 


     


    As for the abilities of blue blocking, I guess we'll see. My iPad is jailbroken with flux on, buy my iPhones running the very latest software, so not jailbroken. Think it'll be really hard to test it effectiveness without taking real time and effort. I could use it without the glasses in the evenings, but a good nights sleep is so dependent on so many things, it would be hard to know just how well it works.


    Katolotus

    MMA Fighter

     

    SUCCESS: A lot of little things done well

  • ACH85ACH85 ✭✭

    Curious to know how it goes, kato. 


     


    On the issue of only filtering out 28% of blue light, I thought I'd update the thread... in a recent podcast with Max Lugavere (229) Dave said:


     



    It's filtering out just a narrow spectrum of blue, the spectrum of blue that most suppresses melatonin. So you can still see colors on your phone during the day. It doesn't filter out every spectrum of blue like an orange screen on the phone, would do that more effectively, but it does take out the worst parts. So it's a harm reduction strategy that lets you still, OK, you know I am going to need to look at my phone as an alarm clock for instance...


     


    ...it's not perfect, but if you're going to look at your phone, and let's face it, you probably are going to, you may as well not turn off your melatonin.


     



     


    (41:25) 


  • katolotuskatolotus ✭✭✭

    I did hear that podcast and it's what actually got me to look on the site for it. Didn't remember the details, but knew it was the type of thing I'm looking for if I can't jailbreak it.


    Katolotus

    MMA Fighter

     

    SUCCESS: A lot of little things done well



  • I just wear my $6 blue-blocker glasses at night and they work for every screen. No need to buy a screen protector like this IMO.




    do you have a link to these $6 blue blockers?

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