Found Mold Under Mattress

Modern Life SurvivalistModern Life Survivalist Saturated Fat Truther ✭✭

Wow. This crap is freaking relentless. I guess this explains all the sleep disturbances. I have had the mattress on the floor (off the mattress risers) for a few months. Didn't think that mold would grow so readily. Should have lifted it off the ground every day. Not sure if it was there before (hadn't taken a close look at it). 


 


This is actually good news. You can feel a whole lot better without mold under the bed you're sleeping in for 10 hours a night.


 


Fun.


 


CBjYs4iUoAERn-l.jpg


Comments

  • How do you know it's toxic mold? Some mold colonies are innocuous.


     


    We had a mold inspector come the other day. He said that the mold we have on our bathroom ceiling is pretty much harmless.


  • seems you have a rug like I do.....i should of gotten a wooden floor apartment.


  • Modern Life SurvivalistModern Life Survivalist Saturated Fat Truther ✭✭


    seems you have a rug like I do.....i should of gotten a wooden floor apartment.




    Actually, it's a vinyl-like flooring in my bedroom. The hall has a rug.

  • Modern Life SurvivalistModern Life Survivalist Saturated Fat Truther ✭✭


    How do you know it's toxic mold? Some mold colonies are innocuous.


     


    We had a mold inspector come the other day. He said that the mold we have on our bathroom ceiling is pretty much harmless.




    I'm pretty sensitive to all molds. Just had to be in the same room with it while it was exposed like this, and I was getting a headache.

  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭


    How do you know it's toxic mold? Some mold colonies are innocuous.


     


    We had a mold inspector come the other day. He said that the mold we have on our bathroom ceiling is pretty much harmless.




     


    Mold spores and fruiting bodies can be officially "innocuous" and still irritating enough to provoke an allergic response, clog sinuses or even stimulate asthma symptoms. It does not have to be toxic mold to be an issue. I had to go through mold remediation for "non-toxic" or "innocuous" mold, and it is still heinous stuff, especially when trying to sleep properly.


     


     


    Modern Life Survivalist you can pick up a couple Sansevieria trifasciata (snake plant or mother-in-law's tongue) as a cheap, easy to care for way to keep the air cleaner in your bedroom. Check out the Big Home Department Store with the Orange Roof, they have decent prices on the larger plants. There are other air quality houseplants (bromeliads are one) but s. triafasciata is hands down the easiest to care for and propagate. Oh, and use something that is a formulated mold cleansing and encapsulating product to eliminate the mold, or you could only cover up the visible mold and make the issue even worse as soon as it gets humid! Bleach does not work, even for regular household/environmental mold. (Think spritzing a wasp nest with soapy water!)

  • Sparefilms, you mentioned a "formulated mold cleansing and encapsulating product".  Where does one find such a product?  And could you suggest a particular one that you have found to work well?  Thanks.


  • Modern Life SurvivalistModern Life Survivalist Saturated Fat Truther ✭✭


    Mold spores and fruiting bodies can be officially "innocuous" and still irritating enough to provoke an allergic response, clog sinuses or even stimulate asthma symptoms. It does not have to be toxic mold to be an issue. I had to go through mold remediation for "non-toxic" or "innocuous" mold, and it is still heinous stuff, especially when trying to sleep properly.


     


     


    Modern Life Survivalist you can pick up a couple Sansevieria trifasciata (snake plant or mother-in-law's tongue) as a cheap, easy to care for way to keep the air cleaner in your bedroom. Check out the Big Home Department Store with the Orange Roof, they have decent prices on the larger plants. There are other air quality houseplants (bromeliads are one) but s. triafasciata is hands down the easiest to care for and propagate. Oh, and use something that is a formulated mold cleansing and encapsulating product to eliminate the mold, or you could only cover up the visible mold and make the issue even worse as soon as it gets humid! Bleach does not work, even for regular household/environmental mold. (Think spritzing a wasp nest with soapy water!)




     


    Snake plant? Not unlike Bulletproof snake oil I suppose?


    Just kidding, I will definitely have to get one. Sounds exciting, thank you!


     


    I actually have dealt with mold a lot, because I got very sick from my last house, which had mold everywhere, and I had to abandon ship and move in with my parents. That's why I was saying it's "relentless" and follows me everywhere essentially. I know not to use bleach now. I wouldn't want to ever use it, anyway, because I'm horrendously sensitive to it. 


    I actually squirted some 3% hydrogen peroxide on there, LOL, and my parents made fun of me, because they said it's too aqueous to really do anything but exacerbate the problem. The mattress is outside in the sun right now cooking. I'm probably not going to use it again. Needless to say, I slept on the couch last night, and my wife found a very thin mattress topper to lie on on the floor. We both slept well enough.


     


    I'm looking for organic mattress solutions at the moment. I have a half Zafu futon, but it is not broken in. I also was trying out some new Magolia cotton sheets, and did not do so well. I didn't wash them before trying them, so that could be the problem. That was part 1 of last night's sleep attempts. Part 2 was floor on top of two afghans, which sucked, then I moved to the couch, which really did the trick. Couch is my default until I can figure out a new mattress.

  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭


    Sparefilms, you mentioned a "formulated mold cleansing and encapsulating product".  Where does one find such a product?  And could you suggest a particular one that you have found to work well?  Thanks.




     


    Concrobium Mold Control, found at the "Big Home Department Store with the Orange Roof". (I'm avoiding favoritism since pricing and availability is more important in this case) There are many types of sprays that you can find in the cleaning sections of home improvement stores, just pay close attention to the labels and chose one that is based around a kill-and-encapsulate mechanism of action.


     


     


     




    I'm looking for organic mattress solutions at the moment. I have a half Zafu futon, but it is not broken in. I also was trying out some new Magolia cotton sheets, and did not do so well. I didn't wash them before trying them, so that could be the problem. That was part 1 of last night's sleep attempts. Part 2 was floor on top of two afghans, which sucked, then I moved to the couch, which really did the trick. Couch is my default until I can figure out a new mattress.




     


    https://www.tuftandneedle.com/ is where I will be buying my next mattress, as soon as I find a suitable place to relocate. They are very well priced in my opinion (and I use to hawk furniture for a living!). I would recommend high quality 100% hemp (http://www.rawganique.com/Bed.htm) or hemp/linen blend sheets, as they will resist mold. (Unless you want to try out the Sheex bedsheets and tell everyone how they do, nudge nudge  ;))


     


     


     


    I've dealt with the house full of mold issue using Concrobium Mold Control, which puts down a protective layer after killing and encapsulating the existing mold, but I do not trust the house even with the Concrobium protection in the coming high-humidity months. I am currently working on microbiological control methods which I will be able to test in the coming week, and I have high hopes for.

  • Thanks for that information, Sparefilms.  And please do report to us about your microbiological control methods for the humid months. 


  • Modern Life SurvivalistModern Life Survivalist Saturated Fat Truther ✭✭


    Concrobium Mold Control, found at the "Big Home Department Store with the Orange Roof". (I'm avoiding favoritism since pricing and availability is more important in this case) There are many types of sprays that you can find in the cleaning sections of home improvement stores, just pay close attention to the labels and chose one that is based around a kill-and-encapsulate mechanism of action.


     


     


     


     


    https://www.tuftandneedle.com/ is where I will be buying my next mattress, as soon as I find a suitable place to relocate. They are very well priced in my opinion (and I use to hawk furniture for a living!). I would recommend high quality 100% hemp (http://www.rawganique.com/Bed.htm) or hemp/linen blend sheets, as they will resist mold. (Unless you want to try out the Sheex bedsheets and tell everyone how they do, nudge nudge  ;))


     


     


     


    I've dealt with the house full of mold issue using Concrobium Mold Control, which puts down a protective layer after killing and encapsulating the existing mold, but I do not trust the house even with the Concrobium protection in the coming high-humidity months. I am currently working on microbiological control methods which I will be able to test in the coming week, and I have high hopes for.




     


    Thank you so much for the detailed recommendations. I am excited to look at the mattress/sheet options you've recommended. 


     


    As far as the Concrobium goes, I'd be a little reluctant to employ any kind of antimicrobial for fear of compromising my own beneficial bacteria. Anything I've found that's anti-mold is also anti-bacterial, and I usually don't feel too great after introducing it. I've kind of come to accept that mold is everywhere, and as long as I don't smell it or see it, then the level is something I can deal with. This latest episode has gotten me sniffing around/looking around for it a little more, though. Any thoughts?

  • Modern Life SurvivalistModern Life Survivalist Saturated Fat Truther ✭✭


    https://www.tuftandneedle.com/ is where I will be buying my next mattress, as soon as I find a suitable place to relocate. They are very well priced in my opinion (and I use to hawk furniture for a living!). I would recommend high quality 100% hemp (http://www.rawganique.com/Bed.htm) or hemp/linen blend sheets, as they will resist mold. (Unless you want to try out the Sheex bedsheets and tell everyone how they do, nudge 




    Is this Tuft & Needle mattress organic and such? I didn't see any claims that said so. What do you like about it?

  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭


    Is this Tuft & Needle mattress organic and such? I didn't see any claims that said so. What do you like about it?




     


    Their original model was made with a natural latex core and a quilted top I believe. It appears they have updated their design to a two-layer core.


    https://www.tuftandneedle.com/about/design


    https://www.tuftandneedle.com/mattress


     


    I am a fan of the price (I use to sling furniture and they are honest about pricing), it is hand-made in the U.S.A., free delivery, basically the entire checklist on the /mattress link above.

  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭


    Thank you so much for the detailed recommendations. I am excited to look at the mattress/sheet options you've recommended. 


     


    As far as the Concrobium goes, I'd be a little reluctant to employ any kind of antimicrobial for fear of compromising my own beneficial bacteria. Anything I've found that's anti-mold is also anti-bacterial, and I usually don't feel too great after introducing it. I've kind of come to accept that mold is everywhere, and as long as I don't smell it or see it, then the level is something I can deal with. This latest episode has gotten me sniffing around/looking around for it a little more, though. Any thoughts?




     


    The Concrobium product is designed to settle on surfaces and harden into a protective layer (hence the 'encapsulating' aspect) and is rendered inert as far as your personal microbiome goes. Unless you go around licking the walls or floor perhaps! I definitely recommend a charcoal filter painters mask, it smells like flea fogger and burns the nasal passages. It is still non-toxic to humans though. The anti-microbial aspect shouldn't be an issue if you use protective gear, and if it somehow is then a probiotic regimen is preferable to environmental mold in the home in my opinion.


     


     


    In the months to come as the rainy season progresses I will be enacting my own second phase of mold control, retesting the home environment and revamping some leaking plumbing and HVAC lines and the like, so I will provide updates and links aplenty as plans commence. Moldy homes are heinous, and we must unite against them!

  • Modern Life SurvivalistModern Life Survivalist Saturated Fat Truther ✭✭


    Their original model was made with a natural latex core and a quilted top I believe. It appears they have updated their design to a two-layer core.


    https://www.tuftandneedle.com/about/design


    https://www.tuftandneedle.com/mattress


     


    I am a fan of the price (I use to sling furniture and they are honest about pricing), it is hand-made in the U.S.A., free delivery, basically the entire checklist on the /mattress link above.




     


     


    So you think it's the way to go? Better than going full-on organic? Can't decide... It's definitely more reasonable than these, which would be ideal if not for the price: 


     


    http://www.savvyrestnaturalbedroom.com/products/mattresses


    http://theeastcoastorganicmattressstore.com/natural-organic-latex-mattresses/oms-private-label/



    Do you think for someone who has lots of allergies/sensitivities that tripling the price for something like this would be worth it? 

  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭
    edited April 2015


    So you think it's the way to go? Better than going full-on organic? Can't decide... It's definitely more reasonable than these, which would be ideal if not for the price: 


     


    http://www.savvyrestnaturalbedroom.com/products/mattresses


    http://theeastcoastorganicmattressstore.com/natural-organic-latex-mattresses/oms-private-label/


    Do you think for someone who has lots of allergies/sensitivities that tripling the price for something like this would be worth it? 




     


    (This might be long and rant-ish, but this is an instance of my recommending an expensive product (a mattress) that I have not personally tried, so I am going to attempt to provide as much information to illustrate my position as my laptop charge at this coffee shop allows. If needed I will edit or reply to explain further!)


     


     


    On a personal level I am quite sensitive to my immediate environment (hyperosmia / super-taster / indoctrinated into cleanliness first by a father who designed and worked in clean rooms and hazardous environs and then by watching Gordon Ramsay obsessively). I am also extremely picky when it comes to textile choice, fabric texture, residual smell, comfort, fit of clothing, and of course aesthetic appeal. In addition to all of these wonderful [read: horribly inconvenient] proclivities, I am highly allergic to cats and have a naturally overactive immune system and inflammatory response, which serves well in overcoming illness quickly but is detrimental in certain environments and especially near mold, mildew, and any textile with urine or harsh chemical smells.


     


     


     


    All that being said, I am also keenly aware of how and why particular groups tend to formulate particular ideas surrounding certain terms and/or phrases. In this light I find the marketing term "organic" to be, in certain cases, just that: a marketing term. "Organic" does not necessarily equate to "ideal" or "better" the same way that "ancient" or "traditional" does not necessarily equate to "better" than "modern" (hoping everyone is filling in the word medicine in there, or meditation) and "hand crafted" does not necessarily equate to "high quality". In my opinion, all of these marketing factors should be weighed both by importance to you and by the efficacy of the claim. There is a very real give and take, and in this case a huge pocket book consideration, between perceived ideals of manufacture or sourcing and what actually constitutes value towards your own end goals. This is one of the primary reasons I take copious amounts of time to consider major purchases and thoroughly vet the manufacturers in addition to reading reviews and trying things out when I can. In this particular case you will most likely have to rely on the company's return policy (which needs to be strictly adhered to in the case of mattresses in particular, due to both seller, state and federal restrictions in the U.S. of A.) unless you happen to live near one of the manufacturers or distribution hubs.


     


     


    Moving on more directly to your question after all that rambling, I think there are a few points to consider carefully here:


     


    1) What type of performance do you need from your mattress? Is there a feature you need that one has over the others? Since this is a major purchase, how will you want it to perform in the future, or will you be upgrading at a later date?


    2) What are the "non-organic" components of the mattress you are considering, and what adverse reactions are possible from theses components?


    3) Have you had any experience with these compounds before, and if so how did you react? If not is it possible to test to ensure no adverse reactions will result?


    4) Will you be taking precautions to mold-proof your new mattress if you will be using it in the previously mold-prone location? (If not I would suggest a hypoallergenic mattress cover that is both mold-poof and washable to protect your investment)


    5) Consider what size mattress you need now vs in the future, and price a rudimentary bedframe or boxspring to be included. This will extend the life of your mattress significantly, and the options abound. Platform beds and rope-frame beds are awesome and relatively simple DIY projects that can be as cheap or expensive as you desire


    6) Consider the latex allergy or wool allergy potential for any future bedmates, if you are not allergic yourself. 


     


     


    The links you provided look quite promising, although the prices are most definitely points of contention. You could look at it this way: the more expensive, the longer term the investment is. The Tuft & Needle offerings are nearly at cost (of course they, like any business, must make a profit) thus they can be looked at as short-term investments to be upgraded later / sold / switched to your guest bedroom when you want a new option. I have come across a few other interesting options in the all-wool category when looking into viking-style rope beds:


     


    http://shepherdsdream.com/product-category/wool-mattress/


    https://www.surroundewe.com/Products.asp?ID=8&d=0


     


     


     


    A great avenue of inquiry would be to contact these companies directly and give them a brief synopsis of what you are looking for and your sensitivities, they would be able to clear up any questions about their products and even give you tips on letting the materials out-gas when the mattress first arrives, and how to handle it for the warranty period to ensure you are satisfied with your purchase.


     


     


    I have to reiterate that I have no direct experience with any of these, I only have familiarity with standard mattresses and have been wanting to get away from them for years now. 


     


     


    My final piece of advice for now is to avoid compromise when it comes to major purchases that will affect your health. Sleep is of the utmost importance (and mine is completely disrupted at the moment!) and I would recommend designing your entire sleep environment to enhance your quality of sleep which has been disrupted by mold, finding out how much of the design your budget can enact then purchasing components accordingly. Air quality, light and comfort, in that order, is how I tackled my situation. If you are confident in your purchases and happy with the choice you will feel more at ease, and that in and of itself will enhance your sleep, so it is a win-win once you decide what your budget can absorb. A crisp, clean set of very high quality sheets can also make you feel like new, and enhance your sleep environment tremendously, so don't leave those out! 


  • Modern Life SurvivalistModern Life Survivalist Saturated Fat Truther ✭✭


    (This might be long and rant-ish, but this is an instance of my recommending an expensive product (a mattress) that I have not personally tried, so I am going to attempt to provide as much information to illustrate my position as my laptop charge at this coffee shop allows. If needed I will edit or reply to explain further!)


     


     


    On a personal level I am quite sensitive to my immediate environment (hyperosmia / super-taster / indoctrinated into cleanliness first by a father who designed and worked in clean rooms and hazardous environs and then by watching Gordon Ramsay obsessively). I am also extremely picky when it comes to textile choice, fabric texture, residual smell, comfort, fit of clothing, and of course aesthetic appeal. In addition to all of these wonderful [read: horribly inconvenient] proclivities, I am highly allergic to cats and have a naturally overactive immune system and inflammatory response, which serves well in overcoming illness quickly but is detrimental in certain environments and especially near mold, mildew, and any textile with urine or harsh chemical smells.


     


     


     


    All that being said, I am also keenly aware of how and why particular groups tend to formulate particular ideas surrounding certain terms and/or phrases. In this light I find the marketing term "organic" to be, in certain cases, just that: a marketing term. "Organic" does not necessarily equate to "ideal" or "better" the same way that "ancient" or "traditional" does not necessarily equate to "better" than "modern" (hoping everyone is filling in the word medicine in there, or meditation) and "hand crafted" does not necessarily equate to "high quality". In my opinion, all of these marketing factors should be weighed both by importance to you and by the efficacy of the claim. There is a very real give and take, and in this case a huge pocket book consideration, between perceived ideals of manufacture or sourcing and what actually constitutes value towards your own end goals. This is one of the primary reasons I take copious amounts of time to consider major purchases and thoroughly vet the manufacturers in addition to reading reviews and trying things out when I can. In this particular case you will most likely have to rely on the company's return policy (which needs to be strictly adhered to in the case of mattresses in particular, due to both seller, state and federal restrictions in the U.S. of A.) unless you happen to live near one of the manufacturers or distribution hubs.


     


     


    Moving on more directly to your question after all that rambling, I think there are a few points to consider carefully here:


     


    1) What type of performance do you need from your mattress? Is there a feature you need that one has over the others? Since this is a major purchase, how will you want it to perform in the future, or will you be upgrading at a later date?


    2) What are the "non-organic" components of the mattress you are considering, and what adverse reactions are possible from theses components?


    3) Have you had any experience with these compounds before, and if so how did you react? If not is it possible to test to ensure no adverse reactions will result?


    4) Will you be taking precautions to mold-proof your new mattress if you will be using it in the previously mold-prone location? (If not I would suggest a hypoallergenic mattress cover that is both mold-poof and washable to protect your investment)


    5) Consider what size mattress you need now vs in the future, and price a rudimentary bedframe or boxspring to be included. This will extend the life of your mattress significantly, and the options abound. Platform beds and rope-frame beds are awesome and relatively simple DIY projects that can be as cheap or expensive as you desire


    6) Consider the latex allergy or wool allergy potential for any future bedmates, if you are not allergic yourself. 


     


     


    The links you provided look quite promising, although the prices are most definitely points of contention. You could look at it this way: the more expensive, the longer term the investment is. The Tuft & Needle offerings are nearly at cost (of course they, like any business, must make a profit) thus they can be looked at as short-term investments to be upgraded later / sold / switched to your guest bedroom when you want a new option. I have come across a few other interesting options in the all-wool category when looking into viking-style rope beds:


     


    http://shepherdsdream.com/product-category/wool-mattress/


    https://www.surroundewe.com/Products.asp?ID=8&d=0


     


     


     


    A great avenue of inquiry would be to contact these companies directly and give them a brief synopsis of what you are looking for and your sensitivities, they would be able to clear up any questions about their products and even give you tips on letting the materials out-gas when the mattress first arrives, and how to handle it for the warranty period to ensure you are satisfied with your purchase.


     


     


    I have to reiterate that I have no direct experience with any of these, I only have familiarity with standard mattresses and have been wanting to get away from them for years now. 


     


     


    My final piece of advice for now is to avoid compromise when it comes to major purchases that will affect your health. Sleep is of the utmost importance (and mine is completely disrupted at the moment!) and I would recommend designing your entire sleep environment to enhance your quality of sleep which has been disrupted by mold, finding out how much of the design your budget can enact then purchasing components accordingly. Air quality, light and comfort, in that order, is how I tackled my situation. If you are confident in your purchases and happy with the choice you will feel more at ease, and that in and of itself will enhance your sleep, so it is a win-win once you decide what your budget can absorb. A crisp, clean set of very high quality sheets can also make you feel like new, and enhance your sleep environment tremendously, so don't leave those out! 




     


    Lots of great points! Thanks for taking the time. Wow, it's kind of a dizzying prospect altogether. I just try to upgrade as much as I can at certain points when I'm able in life. Thank God, I am self-employed and have good cash flow, but I have to actually plan big purchases like this to some extent. 


    I might end up getting that one mattress you originally recommended. I think the organic ones are a bit much.


     


    My particular sensitivities have lately been to bleach and other chemicals. I've done some organic cotton sheets from Target and have not had good luck. I just washed a new pair of 100% organic cotton sheets that should be of higher quality, but I'm not sure what will happen when I try them again. I don't have a mattress to put them on, anyway. I'm on the couch, and my wife is on this Zafu half-queen organic futon that works for me chemically, but caves in too much and gives me a backache almost instantly. I was going to let her break it in awhile then try it again and maybe get the "other half" queen for my other half (also incidentally a queen who deserves better than all of this fuss).


     


    :-)

  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭
    edited April 2015


    My particular sensitivities have lately been to bleach and other chemicals. I've done some organic cotton sheets from Target and have not had good luck. I just washed a new pair of 100% organic cotton sheets that should be of higher quality, but I'm not sure what will happen when I try them again. I don't have a mattress to put them on, anyway. I'm on the couch, and my wife is on this Zafu half-queen organic futon that works for me chemically, but caves in too much and gives me a backache almost instantly. I was going to let her break it in awhile then try it again and maybe get the "other half" queen for my other half (also incidentally a queen who deserves better than all of this fuss).


     


    :smile:




     


    (This forum hates bulleted formatting, so I apologize for how unorganized this turned out. I had to reformat the entire post after the fact Bulletproof-no-bullet)


     


    When purchasing new sheets (or caring for any textiles really):


     


    After checking the fit, always run them through a heavy wash cycle. Do not use them immediately. They have been manufactured using some potent chemicals. What, the label says they haven't? It's wrong. Don't trust it.


    "Chemicals" is not a dirty word here! Everything is chemicals, at a certain level. Just depends on what chemicals you want to roll around in. 


     


    Use hypoallergenic laundry soap, and for extra oomph you can dump in some baking soda, or fill the fabric softener section with Simple Green.


    Check out some soap nuts! Alternatively, use some dish soap! I prefer Seven Generations dish soap, one of the few that rinses clean enough that I do not taste it after washing dishes (or smell it on my glasses after washing them). 


     


    Always set the fabric softener setting to ON as it increases the water level in both wash AND rinse cycles in modern low-flow energy-efficient washers. This will help achieve a better rinse on your textiles.


     


    Avoid using HOT water on your new sheets since this damages organic fibers.


     


    Check your sheets after washing as they may need an extra wash/rinse cycle to rid them of the Simple Green smell or of residual baking soda


    Don't be persuaded by those "you're wasting all that water" outcries, since municipal water is recycled at waste treatment plants and is not actually "wasted". If you are in the countryside then your septic tank or greywater system is putting this water back into the water cycle where it belongs. Either way, you are only out a few dollars for an extra wash cycle that is enhancing your sleep and this extra cycle will serve to purge more of the industrial solvents used in the dyeing and dye-setting processes. Matter cannot be destroyed, and water matters. Use the water for things that matter!


     


    If you are able, hang your new sheets either outdoors or at least in direct sunlight in a large, untinted window. This will assist in off-gassing all the industrial solvents.


    Monitor this closely, as you do not want to sun-bleach your new sheets! This is one reason I prefer outdoors, since the sun does the work and the Earth changes the angle of exposure for us.


     


    Do not use commercial or community laundr-o-mats if you can avoid it. Or ever. Craigslist a washer for yourself or find a local appliance repair shop, it is not worth aggravating your sensitivities to use a washer or dryer that you do not clean yourself and where you are not in control of what is used in it.


     


    When inspecting whatever washer you have, be sure to take the upper shell off and check the drum for mold or mildew on the outside of the drum. Modern washers keep standing water in the bottom to condition rubber seals, and this is not only moronic but also a breeding-ground for nasty things like mold. Cleaning these is a bear, and if you are as obsessive as I am you will end up ordering specialty tools like a 'tub wrench' off of eBay for your particular model of washer. There are only a handful of screws that hold the tops on, and many guides and how-to's online.


    Simple Green comes in handy here again, but you have to make sure you purchase the anti-microbial version, which is a few dollars more. It will not hurt your personal microbiome unless you drink it or bathe in it. 


     


    Hemp sheets. If you are wealthy. Then feel free to collect all the envy I send your way. 


    Linen sheets, only if you are wealthy enough to have a housekeeper who will care for them. Then feel free to go to your bungalow in Malta and stay there with all your money! ;)


     


    You could also re-fog using the Concrobium product after you purchase and approve of your new mattress, and the smell will fade from the mattress in a few days. Adds a layer of protection, at the price of a few days of smell and nasal dryness. I wouldn't do this to your sheets though.


     


    Ignore claims about the cotton coming from a particular place if you are not buying from a boutique or specialty manufacturer. Threadcount is what matters. Unzip the package and feel it. Fine cotton stays roughly the same after a few dozen washes. Linen becomes softer. Hemp may become softer like linen if the hemp is of high quality. Silk is delicate and should be washed gently and sparingly if possible. Avoid applying high heat to linen, hemp or silk if possible. Avoid excess exposure of silk to sunlight.


     


     


     


    For the futon dilemma (because I did that for years as well, and sold those things):


     


    Head over to the Big Orange Home Store and get them to rip a piece of 3/4" finished-sided plywood down to just under the size of one half of the folding frame mechanism. Drill holes at strategic locations to line up on either side of the bars of the folding frame, and use industrial zip-ties to secure one of your two pieces of plywood to your side of the futon frame. Your wife now has a soft, cushy futon like she is use to and you have a much firmer sleep surface on your side. Total cost should be ~$37 (plus any transport fee if you cannot fit the plywood in your vehicle, i.e. a beer for your buddy who has a truck). This is assuming you use quality plywood.


    Leave the plywood to out-gas on your porch or somewhere outdoors if you think it necessary. Use a quality stain on it like linseed oil if needed, or hemp oil if you are wealthy. (DO NOT dispose of rags or brushes used for linseed oil in a trash can of any kind. When balled up and deprived of airflow linseed oil rags can cause combustion, and combustion causes fire. House fires negatively impact sleep quality.)


     


    AVOID wafer-board or MDF board. These are mostly glue, and the off-gassing takes ages. 


     


    Cedar, mahogany or redwood paneling may be available in your local area, and is a more expensive option but may treat your chemical sensitivities kinder.


     


    If you know what brand the futon mattress is, then contact the manufacturer or a local store to see if they carry other styles of futon mattresses by the same company. The more expensive futon mattresses can even have innersprings, but are near the cost of the Tuft & Needle mattresses themselves.


     


     


     


    Acne-prevention research has revealed that changing your bedsheets weekly, as well as bi-monthly flipping of the mattress, helps to reduce inflammation and outbreaks in some acne sufferers. Combining new sheets with a new mattress, new pillows, new carpet, air cleaning plants and a HEPA filter should improve sleep quality BUT these will all need to be maintained regularly, so multiple sets of sheets, pillows and pillow cases will be a necessity (although you could get away with two sets, or even one if you are diligent about laundry). Don't feel discouraged, since everything you are doing is something I am having to put off due to lack of capital and a home environment that would contaminate my new shiny purchases. 


     


     


    Don't overlook Sheex brand sheet sets (which you can now check out in person at the Going Past Beds and Baths Store) since they are performance and sleep-hack centric.


    http://www.sheex.com/


     


     


    I'd also advise choosing a minimum of two sheet sets and both you and your wife picking a separate color. This allows for multiple combinations of sheets/pillowcases/flat sheets and the like, which is a bedroom-centered couples activity, which makes the new mattress and sleep environment gear pay for itself   :mrgreen:


     


    Hope this helps, it has taken years of ruining things and settling for the bare minimum to learn all of this!




  • (This forum hates bulleted formatting, so I apologize for how unorganized this turned out. I had to reformat the entire post after the fact Bulletproof-no-bullet)


     


    When purchasing new sheets (or caring for any textiles really):


     


    After checking the fit, always run them through a heavy wash cycle. Do not use them immediately. They have been manufactured using some potent chemicals. What, the label says they haven't? It's wrong. Don't trust it.


    "Chemicals" is not a dirty word here! Everything is chemicals, at a certain level. Just depends on what chemicals you want to roll around in. 


     


    Use hypoallergenic laundry soap, and for extra oomph you can dump in some baking soda, or fill the fabric softener section with Simple Green.


    Check out some soap nuts! Alternatively, use some dish soap! I prefer Seven Generations dish soap, one of the few that rinses clean enough that I do not taste it after washing dishes (or smell it on my glasses after washing them). 


     


    Always set the fabric softener setting to ON as it increases the water level in both wash AND rinse cycles in modern low-flow energy-efficient washers. This will help achieve a better rinse on your textiles.


     


    Avoid using HOT water on your new sheets since this damages organic fibers.


     


    Check your sheets after washing as they may need an extra wash/rinse cycle to rid them of the Simple Green smell or of residual baking soda


    Don't be persuaded by those "you're wasting all that water" outcries, since municipal water is recycled at waste treatment plants and is not actually "wasted". If you are in the countryside then your septic tank or greywater system is putting this water back into the water cycle where it belongs. Either way, you are only out a few dollars for an extra wash cycle that is enhancing your sleep and this extra cycle will serve to purge more of the industrial solvents used in the dyeing and dye-setting processes. Matter cannot be destroyed, and water matters. Use the water for things that matter!


     


    If you are able, hang your new sheets either outdoors or at least in direct sunlight in a large, untinted window. This will assist in off-gassing all the industrial solvents.


    Monitor this closely, as you do not want to sun-bleach your new sheets! This is one reason I prefer outdoors, since the sun does the work and the Earth changes the angle of exposure for us.


     


    Do not use commercial or community laundr-o-mats if you can avoid it. Or ever. Craigslist a washer for yourself or find a local appliance repair shop, it is not worth aggravating your sensitivities to use a washer or dryer that you do not clean yourself and where you are not in control of what is used in it.


     


    When inspecting whatever washer you have, be sure to take the upper shell off and check the drum for mold or mildew on the outside of the drum. Modern washers keep standing water in the bottom to condition rubber seals, and this is not only moronic but also a breeding-ground for nasty things like mold. Cleaning these is a bear, and if you are as obsessive as I am you will end up ordering specialty tools like a 'tub wrench' off of eBay for your particular model of washer. There are only a handful of screws that hold the tops on, and many guides and how-to's online.


    Simple Green comes in handy here again, but you have to make sure you purchase the anti-microbial version, which is a few dollars more. It will not hurt your personal microbiome unless you drink it or bathe in it. 


     


    Hemp sheets. If you are wealthy. Then feel free to collect all the envy I send your way. 


    Linen sheets, only if you are wealthy enough to have a housekeeper who will care for them. Then feel free to go to your bungalow in Malta and stay there with all your money! ;)


     


    You could also re-fog using the Concrobium product after you purchase and approve of your new mattress, and the smell will fade from the mattress in a few days. Adds a layer of protection, at the price of a few days of smell and nasal dryness. I wouldn't do this to your sheets though.


     


    Ignore claims about the cotton coming from a particular place if you are not buying from a boutique or specialty manufacturer. Threadcount is what matters. Unzip the package and feel it. Fine cotton stays roughly the same after a few dozen washes. Linen becomes softer. Hemp may become softer like linen if the hemp is of high quality. Silk is delicate and should be washed gently and sparingly if possible. Avoid applying high heat to linen, hemp or silk if possible. Avoid excess exposure of silk to sunlight.


     


     


     


    For the futon dilemma (because I did that for years as well, and sold those things):


     


    Head over to the Big Orange Home Store and get them to rip a piece of 3/4" finished-sided plywood down to just under the size of one half of the folding frame mechanism. Drill holes at strategic locations to line up on either side of the bars of the folding frame, and use industrial zip-ties to secure one of your two pieces of plywood to your side of the futon frame. Your wife now has a soft, cushy futon like she is use to and you have a much firmer sleep surface on your side. Total cost should be ~$37 (plus any transport fee if you cannot fit the plywood in your vehicle, i.e. a beer for your buddy who has a truck). This is assuming you use quality plywood.


    Leave the plywood to out-gas on your porch or somewhere outdoors if you think it necessary. Use a quality stain on it like linseed oil if needed, or hemp oil if you are wealthy. (DO NOT dispose of rags or brushes used for linseed oil in a trash can of any kind. When balled up and deprived of airflow linseed oil rags can cause combustion, and combustion causes fire. House fires negatively impact sleep quality.)


     


    AVOID wafer-board or MDF board. These are mostly glue, and the off-gassing takes ages. 


     


    Cedar, mahogany or redwood paneling may be available in your local area, and is a more expensive option but may treat your chemical sensitivities kinder.


     


    If you know what brand the futon mattress is, then contact the manufacturer or a local store to see if they carry other styles of futon mattresses by the same company. The more expensive futon mattresses can even have innersprings, but are near the cost of the Tuft & Needle mattresses themselves.


     


     


     


    Acne-prevention research has revealed that changing your bedsheets weekly, as well as bi-monthly flipping of the mattress, helps to reduce inflammation and outbreaks in some acne sufferers. Combining new sheets with a new mattress, new pillows, new carpet, air cleaning plants and a HEPA filter should improve sleep quality BUT these will all need to be maintained regularly, so multiple sets of sheets, pillows and pillow cases will be a necessity (although you could get away with two sets, or even one if you are diligent about laundry). Don't feel discouraged, since everything you are doing is something I am having to put off due to lack of capital and a home environment that would contaminate my new shiny purchases. 


     


     


    Don't overlook Sheex brand sheet sets (which you can now check out in person at the Going Past Beds and Baths Store) since they are performance and sleep-hack centric.


    http://www.sheex.com/


     


     


    I'd also advise choosing a minimum of two sheet sets and both you and your wife picking a separate color. This allows for multiple combinations of sheets/pillowcases/flat sheets and the like, which is a bedroom-centered couples activity, which makes the new mattress and sleep environment gear pay for itself   :mrgreen:


     


    Hope this helps, it has taken years of ruining things and settling for the bare minimum to learn all of this!




    It seems to be a good experience on this. I just wonder how can we get the best ones at affordable prices.

  • Modern Life SurvivalistModern Life Survivalist Saturated Fat Truther ✭✭


    (This forum hates bulleted formatting, so I apologize for how unorganized this turned out. I had to reformat the entire post after the fact Bulletproof-no-bullet)


     


    When purchasing new sheets (or caring for any textiles really):


     


    After checking the fit, always run them through a heavy wash cycle. Do not use them immediately. They have been manufactured using some potent chemicals. What, the label says they haven't? It's wrong. Don't trust it.


    "Chemicals" is not a dirty word here! Everything is chemicals, at a certain level. Just depends on what chemicals you want to roll around in. 


     


    Use hypoallergenic laundry soap, and for extra oomph you can dump in some baking soda, or fill the fabric softener section with Simple Green.


    Check out some soap nuts! Alternatively, use some dish soap! I prefer Seven Generations dish soap, one of the few that rinses clean enough that I do not taste it after washing dishes (or smell it on my glasses after washing them). 


     


    Always set the fabric softener setting to ON as it increases the water level in both wash AND rinse cycles in modern low-flow energy-efficient washers. This will help achieve a better rinse on your textiles.


     


    Avoid using HOT water on your new sheets since this damages organic fibers.


     


    Check your sheets after washing as they may need an extra wash/rinse cycle to rid them of the Simple Green smell or of residual baking soda


    Don't be persuaded by those "you're wasting all that water" outcries, since municipal water is recycled at waste treatment plants and is not actually "wasted". If you are in the countryside then your septic tank or greywater system is putting this water back into the water cycle where it belongs. Either way, you are only out a few dollars for an extra wash cycle that is enhancing your sleep and this extra cycle will serve to purge more of the industrial solvents used in the dyeing and dye-setting processes. Matter cannot be destroyed, and water matters. Use the water for things that matter!


     


    If you are able, hang your new sheets either outdoors or at least in direct sunlight in a large, untinted window. This will assist in off-gassing all the industrial solvents.


    Monitor this closely, as you do not want to sun-bleach your new sheets! This is one reason I prefer outdoors, since the sun does the work and the Earth changes the angle of exposure for us.


     


    Do not use commercial or community laundr-o-mats if you can avoid it. Or ever. Craigslist a washer for yourself or find a local appliance repair shop, it is not worth aggravating your sensitivities to use a washer or dryer that you do not clean yourself and where you are not in control of what is used in it.


     


    When inspecting whatever washer you have, be sure to take the upper shell off and check the drum for mold or mildew on the outside of the drum. Modern washers keep standing water in the bottom to condition rubber seals, and this is not only moronic but also a breeding-ground for nasty things like mold. Cleaning these is a bear, and if you are as obsessive as I am you will end up ordering specialty tools like a 'tub wrench' off of eBay for your particular model of washer. There are only a handful of screws that hold the tops on, and many guides and how-to's online.


    Simple Green comes in handy here again, but you have to make sure you purchase the anti-microbial version, which is a few dollars more. It will not hurt your personal microbiome unless you drink it or bathe in it. 


     


    Hemp sheets. If you are wealthy. Then feel free to collect all the envy I send your way. 


    Linen sheets, only if you are wealthy enough to have a housekeeper who will care for them. Then feel free to go to your bungalow in Malta and stay there with all your money! ;)


     


    You could also re-fog using the Concrobium product after you purchase and approve of your new mattress, and the smell will fade from the mattress in a few days. Adds a layer of protection, at the price of a few days of smell and nasal dryness. I wouldn't do this to your sheets though.


     


    Ignore claims about the cotton coming from a particular place if you are not buying from a boutique or specialty manufacturer. Threadcount is what matters. Unzip the package and feel it. Fine cotton stays roughly the same after a few dozen washes. Linen becomes softer. Hemp may become softer like linen if the hemp is of high quality. Silk is delicate and should be washed gently and sparingly if possible. Avoid applying high heat to linen, hemp or silk if possible. Avoid excess exposure of silk to sunlight.


     


     


     


    For the futon dilemma (because I did that for years as well, and sold those things):


     


    Head over to the Big Orange Home Store and get them to rip a piece of 3/4" finished-sided plywood down to just under the size of one half of the folding frame mechanism. Drill holes at strategic locations to line up on either side of the bars of the folding frame, and use industrial zip-ties to secure one of your two pieces of plywood to your side of the futon frame. Your wife now has a soft, cushy futon like she is use to and you have a much firmer sleep surface on your side. Total cost should be ~$37 (plus any transport fee if you cannot fit the plywood in your vehicle, i.e. a beer for your buddy who has a truck). This is assuming you use quality plywood.


    Leave the plywood to out-gas on your porch or somewhere outdoors if you think it necessary. Use a quality stain on it like linseed oil if needed, or hemp oil if you are wealthy. (DO NOT dispose of rags or brushes used for linseed oil in a trash can of any kind. When balled up and deprived of airflow linseed oil rags can cause combustion, and combustion causes fire. House fires negatively impact sleep quality.)


     


    AVOID wafer-board or MDF board. These are mostly glue, and the off-gassing takes ages. 


     


    Cedar, mahogany or redwood paneling may be available in your local area, and is a more expensive option but may treat your chemical sensitivities kinder.


     


    If you know what brand the futon mattress is, then contact the manufacturer or a local store to see if they carry other styles of futon mattresses by the same company. The more expensive futon mattresses can even have innersprings, but are near the cost of the Tuft & Needle mattresses themselves.


     


     


     


    Acne-prevention research has revealed that changing your bedsheets weekly, as well as bi-monthly flipping of the mattress, helps to reduce inflammation and outbreaks in some acne sufferers. Combining new sheets with a new mattress, new pillows, new carpet, air cleaning plants and a HEPA filter should improve sleep quality BUT these will all need to be maintained regularly, so multiple sets of sheets, pillows and pillow cases will be a necessity (although you could get away with two sets, or even one if you are diligent about laundry). Don't feel discouraged, since everything you are doing is something I am having to put off due to lack of capital and a home environment that would contaminate my new shiny purchases. 


     


     


    Don't overlook Sheex brand sheet sets (which you can now check out in person at the Going Past Beds and Baths Store) since they are performance and sleep-hack centric.


    http://www.sheex.com/


     


     


    I'd also advise choosing a minimum of two sheet sets and both you and your wife picking a separate color. This allows for multiple combinations of sheets/pillowcases/flat sheets and the like, which is a bedroom-centered couples activity, which makes the new mattress and sleep environment gear pay for itself   :mrgreen:


     


    Hope this helps, it has taken years of ruining things and settling for the bare minimum to learn all of this!




    Thank you so much for this! I am going to use this as a guide. I finally got to a setup where I can actually wash my sheets now. I had a mildew issue with my old clothes from leaving them undried too long, so I was really frustrated. I'm going to start employing all these things you recommend very soon!


     


    I'm not even using a mattress now. I just do like a yoga mat, afghan, eggshell mattress, sheet stack that seems to work well.

  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭


    Thank you so much for this! I am going to use this as a guide. I finally got to a setup where I can actually wash my sheets now. I had a mildew issue with my old clothes from leaving them undried too long, so I was really frustrated. I'm going to start employing all these things you recommend very soon!


     


    I'm not even using a mattress now. I just do like a yoga mat, afghan, eggshell mattress, sheet stack that seems to work well.




     


    I'm glad my info can help! I'm suffering a resurgence of my own household mold issues over the last few months, it really is the silent killer lurking everywhere. Might be the first time a health threat lives up to the hype since asbestos. 

  • Modern Life SurvivalistModern Life Survivalist Saturated Fat Truther ✭✭


    I'm glad my info can help! I'm suffering a resurgence of my own household mold issues over the last few months, it really is the silent killer lurking everywhere. Might be the first time a health threat lives up to the hype since asbestos. 




     


    That SUCKS dude. Yeah, hell is probably a moldy basement.

  • Havent been able to find much about bullet proof and essential oils but I use a Half and half mix of white vinegar and distilled (or boiled) water. With 10 drops mint EO , 10 drops lemongrass EO , 5 drops Basil EO and 5 drops tee tree EO. I want to add some lime and plan to try and pic some up. Its not necessary. The blend has tons of anti microbial and anti fungal properties as is. Last year we moved into my in-laws house. No choice. They are hordes and have stopped taking care of them selves. I am cleaning, storing and organizing to get things healthy again. This spring I looked up and realized the insulation around the top of the basement we are in was covered in a odd pattern. I took a close look and realized  what I had earlier thought to be soot form a badly installed wood furnace was black mold. Since then I have been on a mold crusade. I feel much better though I know its not all gone. I am using my spray which works very well and my husband ordered a light bulb that kills bacteria and mold. I am doing constant rounds in the house with these. Ill say it works since I am seeing less mold and I am feeling more productive. Added bonus, Everyone asks me "what is that smell? It smells so good!"


  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭


    Havent been able to find much about bullet proof and essential oils but I use a Half and half mix of white vinegar and distilled (or boiled) water. With 10 drops mint EO , 10 drops lemongrass EO , 5 drops Basil EO and 5 drops tee tree EO. I want to add some lime and plan to try and pic some up. Its not necessary. The blend has tons of anti microbial and anti fungal properties as is. Last year we moved into my in-laws house. No choice. They are hordes and have stopped taking care of them selves. I am cleaning, storing and organizing to get things healthy again. This spring I looked up and realized the insulation around the top of the basement we are in was covered in a odd pattern. I took a close look and realized  what I had earlier thought to be soot form a badly installed wood furnace was black mold. Since then I have been on a mold crusade. I feel much better though I know its not all gone. I am using my spray which works very well and my husband ordered a light bulb that kills bacteria and mold. I am doing constant rounds in the house with these. Ill say it works since I am seeing less mold and I am feeling more productive. Added bonus, Everyone asks me "what is that smell? It smells so good!"




     


    Can you provide the brand name or a link to that mold killing bulb?

  • edited July 2015

    Sure! http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007XKZKKK?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00  This is the one We bought. It gets a burning smell when its working and my husband says you shouldent stay in the room with it. He says the smell is ozone. He listens to a lot of podcasts like the bullet proof ones. I am unsure how accurate his information is but it has taken out smells so I guess its doing something. 


  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭

    It looks like it puts out a fair amount of UVC light, so I agree that you would want to leave the room just to avoid overexposure. If it smells like ozone you might want to have your electrical system checked out or the lamp it is plugged in to.


  • Plugged it into a lot of different rooms and had the same effect. My husband seems to think its supposed to do that.


  • Hey folks,


     


    I realize this post has run nearly a year since a reply.  I'm just getting up to speed in here and thought I could add something of value if you all are still looking for some solutions.  I realize BP now has a product out called HomeBiotic, I've not used it and I won't have to.  I'm part of a mold support group near Tucson, AZ and back in Jan '16 we had a presenter from a company called Teraganix. (teraganix.com) They are the makers of a product called EM-1 (effective microorganisms).  During and after the presentation I felt like my head was going to explode because the information was that exciting.  The things this EM-1 can do are mind blowing.  All the information is free and available on their website.  You can get a bottle of EM-1, follow a recipe on their site and make your own EM-5.  This will stop mold in it's tracks (just don't add the plant matter like garlic etc if you are going to use it on mold-stinky).


     


    I've made my own EM-5 and use it in my laundry, to clean the bathrooms, and anywhere for that matter known for mold, and not known for mold.  I use it as one of my primary household cleaners.  I also use the blend with plant extracts as pest control around the perimeter of my house.  Just don't spray it on weeds...unless you really like weeds.  You can call the 800 number and ask all the questions you like, they are really helpful people.  You can also email and they usually reply promptly. 


     


    I have absolutely no ties or financial interest in the company.  I've just been hit hard by mold and lost all my possession multiple times.  This stuff has been a game changer for me and I just can't help but share about it.


  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭

    Terraganix products are top-notch, I'll be comparing them to Homebiotic in my new place to see which is superior. I've even used their EM-1 on sewage leaks from a damaged septic tank and it worked perfectly, eliminating smell and keeping our grass alive. Terraganix also lists each strain used in their products, and their business model focuses on allowing you to grow their EM products yourself and expand your supply. Upgraded Self customer service has refused to a list of strains used in Homebiotic, which is a bit disheartening when introducing foreign bacteria into your living area.


  • Just burn it with fire.
    Seriously. Especially since you're pretty sensitive to any kinds of mold. I would hesitate using it any more. Even if it dries out, the spores will still be present, I would think. Secondly, if there is enough moisture in your crawlspace to be causing mold in a mattress, you have bigger problems to address.

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