To Refeed Or Not To Refeed

Are any or you are doing well eating low carb BP foods sans refeeds? Or is it pretty unanimous around here that refeeeds are the way to go? I know what Dave says, but wondering about what everyone else is up to.


 


Of course I'm more curious to hear from the ladies, but wondering how the gents are doing as well!  x


 


Tagged:

Comments

  • GarrettGarrett
    edited May 2015

    Refeed. This is a cyclic diet. Refeed is necessary, it even says so in the infographic.


    Why are you questioning what Dave says? He put this whole thing together, the way that it is.


    Oh, and not refeeding makes life pretty ugly. I've tried it before... was not fun.


  • Why are you questioning what Dave says? He put this whole thing together, the way that it is.




    Oh, and not refeeding makes life pretty ugly. I've tried it before... was not fun.


     


    Thanks for the comment, Garret_K!


     


    I'm in the habit of questioning everything I read and not blindly following what one single author says, no matter how much I respect him or her. 


     


    There are many leaders in the health community whom even Dave respects that do not advocate refeeds (Nora Gedgaudas and Mark Sisson to name a couple). Then there's Tristan Haggard, Stephanie Person, Ash Simmonds, Volek + Phinney, Jimmy Moore, Eric Westman; the list is endless. These guys eat low carb BP food but do not refeed.  


     


    I'm not questioning "what Dave says". I've read his blog, his book, and fully understand his rationale; rather I'm learning to absorb information regarding health without bias, and experimenting on myself to find what truly works for my individual needs.


     


    Although I don't assume everyone will, I personally do pretty well without refeeds; however after years of dietary extremism and guru following, I'm keeping an open mind as to what I might try in the future. 


     


    By the way, Dave changed my life with his fatty coffee, which I drink every single morning. I love his work, and while there's loads of evidence supporting refeeds, there's also plenty of evidence to the contrary. It's much more fun to question things and try them on for size than to force one's body into someone else's structure, especially if it doesn't work as magically for you as it does for them. :) x

  • You really want to refeed.


    Without the refeed, your body goes from using fat to storing fat. Because it feels like a famine (Extended fast) is here, it will store crucial fat to use later and turn to a source of energy it can use more readily (Muscle protein), since if you've been in Ketosis there is most likely little to no Glycogen in your body to use.


    The refeed reups those glycogen levels and your body wants to use the Glycogen for energy instead of your muscle protein and as you burn off those extra lbs gained 9Don't worry its just water weight) your body will eventually get into ketosis again


  • jbomb,


     


    I appreciate your questioning. And it's good that you've explored around and seen that there are other options.


    I think some of the decision depends on what your goals are. 


    So, in my case, I'm going to come out and say it: I've recently come to the conclusion not to refeed. This is partly based on experience. I played with cycling since right around when the book came out. I always felt terrible, and it would take several days to get back to feeling good. When I didn't cycle, I just felt much better, and even living in an extremely dry climate, no issues with mucous membranes.


    And on reflection, refeeding is counter to my purposes in eating ketogenically: I have type 1 bipolar disorder, and an eating disorder, and I'd love to keep those in check without medications I'm currently taking. When my brain's running on ketones, the switches don't get tripped as much, and when my body's running on ketones, the eating part goes better too.


  • NickatNickat
    edited May 2015
    (Nic) Seriously considering not doing refeeds as long as I'm supplementing with Potassium and additional Magnesium. Maybe will use them to get through a fat loss plateau if need be. The refeeds not the additional supps, that is. Seem to thrive on low carb with higher fiber better.
  • I never do a full "refeed" like the ones I have read about here, it comes from having gotten into Keto before discovering bulletproof. I have gotten more relaxed about avoiding carbs and do get some carbs most days (a little real sweetener, a few pieces of fruit), and occasionally slightly more (a little potato with a meal out, or some sushi rice)... but I have yet to feel compelled to carb up on a regular basis. Blending some dates into my post workout protein shake is probably the biggest glycogen replenishing food choice I make, closest thing I have to a "refeed".


  • Sorry I missed these replies, and thanks so much everyone! We still have a lot to learn about our bodies in terms of carbs and everything else, but it's exciting times we're living in for sure :) x


  • I was under the impression that if you don't carb refeed and are low carb enough your body will be unable to produce mucous resulting in leaky gut and if you are active adrenal fatigue.  No?  That being said my post workout carbs are 30g carbs and my carb up is not a heck of a lot, about 2 cups of rice.




  • I was under the impression that if you don't carb refeed and are low carb enough your body will be unable to produce mucous resulting in leaky gut and if you are active adrenal fatigue.  No?  That being said my post workout carbs are 30g carbs and my carb up is not a heck of a lot, about 2 cups of rice.




     


    That's the bulletproof orthodoxy, and I don't doubt that it's Dave Asprey's experience. But at this point I think it's unhelpful that he couches it in terms of a generalization, that prolonged keto will "give you" leaky gut/adrenal fatigue because that was _his_ experience.


     


    Since I have leaky gut as it is, I gave myself some misery by attempting to cycle carbs (cycling's bad for a bipolar anyway, let alone that keto is good for bipolar), until I acknowledged for myself that aside from other issues, I actually seemed to have drier mucous membranes and more digestive upset on/after carb days than when I stay in ketosis. 


    FWIW, in my self-tracking, mucus irregularities and gut and mood issues tend to relate to food sensitivities, not to ketosis. And then I heard Nora Gedgaudas say something very similar on an older BP podcast. She's a good one to check out, btw, and there are many others, particularly many other women (since Dave says women particularly need the carbs) who attest to doing well on keto without refeeding.


    Again, this is no disrespect to Dave. 

  • @joeld123 I don't think that's what all the studies seem to point to, no. Anecdotally, it seems like there are some who love carb cycling, and some who prefer to stay in ketosis - I guess we each need to find our own thing.


     


    @ela I agree. We need so much more research before knowing anything conclusive. In the meantime, if it makes you feel bad (i.e. carbs give you belly or mind issues) - then maybe best to keep the carbs to a minimum. 


     


    Also am with you about Dave - huge respect and love for him and his work, always. :)

Sign In or Register to comment.