Potatoes - Is There A Way To Make Them Resistant, Like The Rice

mkjmkj
edited May 2015 in The Bulletproof Diet

My dad who is doing the Bulletproof diet is very pleased with the fact that cooking rice and then cooling it makes the starch more resistant. What he wants to know is, does the same thing happen with potatoes? If you cook a potato, then cool it, then reheat it, does it make the starch more resistant? Or is there some way to make potato starch more resistant? He heard something about chopping up potatoes, letting them sit in water to get some starch out overnight, get rid of that water and then cook them in new water, it is less starch. Is this true? I think the way that the Scandinavians would make the potato flour to make their cookies, bread etc was done something like this way, they would get the starch out this way by soaking and then dry it out to make flour. Also, there was a bodybuilding club and they would do a potato diet to get their body fat down and thin out the skin to show the muscle definition before shows, but I think that had to do more with people with a lot of muscle mass burning a lot of calories and a couple of baked potatoes for a meal really isn't a lot of calories. Anyone know anything about potatoes and bulletproof and if there is a way to process them to make them more usable in the diet? My dad has diabetes and misses his Yukon gold potatoes. Thanks for any info -


 


-MKJ for RIK


Comments

  • SkeletorSkeletor The Conqueror Worm ✭✭✭

    IIRC, cooking them and then letting them cool in the fridge overnight should lead to the creation of resistant starch. Reheating them later shouldn't mess with the resistant starch as far as I know, so you don't technically have to eat them cold.


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  • RekaReka ✭✭✭

    This is pretty cool.


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  • IIRC, cooking them and then letting them cool in the fridge overnight should lead to the creation of resistant starch. Reheating them later shouldn't mess with the resistant starch as far as I know, so you don't technically have to eat them cold.




    So sorry to not be able to provide a source for this, but I recall reading that reheating above 130 degrees Fahrenheit undoes the resistant quality bestowed by cooling.

  • SkeletorSkeletor The Conqueror Worm ✭✭✭


    So sorry to not be able to provide a source for this, but I recall reading that reheating above 130 degrees Fahrenheit undoes the resistant quality bestowed by cooling.




    No kidding? I'll have to look into that. Thanks for the tip!

    "I know how to despise mere cool intelligence. What I want is intelligence matched by pure, physical existence, like a statue." --Yukio Mishima

     

    Let's be friends on MyFitnessPal!

  • Speaking of potatoes...


     


    What are the best potatoes?  In terms of type?  The least reactive ones?


  • fixerforhirefixerforhire Mr. Not Sure.


    So sorry to not be able to provide a source for this, but I recall reading that reheating above 130 degrees Fahrenheit undoes the resistant quality bestowed by cooling.




    i wonder if the same temp hold true for reheated rice.

  • I kind of gave up on potatoes since going BP, but recently I had a hankering and cooked some.  Not only did I not have an adverse reaction, but I felt great the next day!  I guess I don't have a problem with nightshades?

  • suntouchersuntoucher Uninspired Potential ✭✭✭
    It will behave the same as powdered potato starch. I believe if you don't exceed 54C/130F (or thereabouts) when reheating it should still be RS.

    But to be truthful:
    - he'll only know for sure if he does a blood glucose test with fresh/cold/reheated potatoes some time after eating them;
    - if you care about RS content, then just eat it powdered cold.
  • Once the resistant starch is formed after it's been cooled, reheating does not destroy the newly formed RS.


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