Would A Bulletproof Ketogenic Diet Help My Ibs?

pd85pd85
edited May 2015 in The Bulletproof Diet

I have had IBS for 7 years. I go 6-10 times per day, I am always uncomfortable and have tons of gas all the time. 


 


I have tried almost everything over the years:


-Xifaxan/Herbal antitbiotics


-FODMAPS


-Gluten Free


-Bulletproof


-Fecal Transplant


-High doses of many different probiotics


-Every fiber ever 


-Every supplement ever 


-Starch/Fiber/Probiotic regimens


-1000 other things


-Stools tests accompanied with coaching


 


Now I'm sure there are other things I haven't tried, but one thing I've never been able to do is a very low-carb diet as I feel like I'm going to die every time I attempt it. 


 


Is there any reason to believe this would help me?


Comments

  • Have you tried raw milk?


  • pd85pd85
    edited May 2015


    Have you tried raw milk?




     


    I have not. What is your reasoning behind trying it?


  • The insane amount of good bacteria, and healthy fats. Plus you can make it into kefir which can further assist your gut.


     


    Just an idea.


     


    When I was dealing with gut issues, it helped me immensely.


  • Have you tried eating a very controlled diet of the same things daily, changing 1 meal component at a time and logging your results? 


  • pd85pd85
    edited May 2015


    The insane amount of good bacteria, and healthy fats. Plus you can make it into kefir which can further assist your gut.


     


    Just an idea.


     


    When I was dealing with gut issues, it helped me immensely.




     


    I would like to consider trying it. For what it's worth, kefir and regular milk absolutely destroy my guts. Even a tablespoon of kefir makes me rumble for a few days. I avoid almost all dairy products except certain cheese on occasion. Is there any reason raw milk would be different than either of these?




    Have you tried eating a very controlled diet of the same things daily, changing 1 meal component at a time and logging your results? 




     


    Yes. I have tried a few different and very limiting diets where I was eating only a few ingredients. I have also logged every single calorie in food logs for months on end on several occasions. I have definitely improved my IBS over the course of the 7 years and this was a large part of it, but I'm still no where near normal in any way. And as my original post alluded to, I have not tried very low-carb diets for extended periods, a GAPS diet, or any kind of bone broth diet. 


  • WinceWince
    edited May 2015

    Have you tried fasting?


     


    https://thefastdiet.co.uk/forums/topic/ibs-cured/


     


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17078771


    I have no experience with IBS, but I am aware of multiple benefits of fasting. Also, it speaks to me logically that if your body has trouble dealing with food you need to give it a break. 




  • Have you tried fasting?


     


    https://thefastdiet.co.uk/forums/topic/ibs-cured/


     


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17078771


    I have no experience with IBS, but I am aware of multiple benefits of fasting. Also, it speaks to me logically that if your body has trouble dealing with food you need to give it a break. 




     


    Yes thanks for bringing this up. I do intermittent fasting daily. From 8pm to about 1pm the next day. It definitely helps give my gut a rest and I enjoy it. I have fasted until 4 or 5pm on occasion but never longer. Do you know how long they fasted for in that study?

  • WalterWalter ✭✭✭

    Buy Fix Your Gut, it's an ebook with loads of advice on how to eat, supplement and live to heal your gut. http://fixyourgut.com/


     


    The author is on this forum and will surely reply.




  • Yes thanks for bringing this up. I do intermittent fasting daily. From 8pm to about 1pm the next day. It definitely helps give my gut a rest and I enjoy it. I have fasted until 4 or 5pm on occasion but never longer. Do you know how long they fasted for in that study?




    Unfortunately I don't know the length of time. One thing that pops up in every dietry corner is explained by Nassim Taleb's concept of randomness. Obviously IF is good, but I wonder if it makes it a little too predictable. I would suggest trying a fast from dinner, to breakfast two days later (or lunch if you would prefer). This will give two nights fasted sleep to start the repair. Try it and see what happens, if you notice no difference at all then it probably isn't the right direction (however I would doubt it's the "wrong" direction).


     


    After this, you need some experts opinion (as mentioned above by Walter).



  • I would like to consider trying it. For what it's worth, kefir and regular milk absolutely destroy my guts. Even a tablespoon of kefir makes me rumble for a few days. I avoid almost all dairy products except certain cheese on occasion. Is there any reason raw milk would be different than either of these?




     


    Raw milk from grass fed cows is completely different from conventional milk in many ways.


    1. The fats and proteins remain undamaged from the heating process of pasteurization, which is much easier on the GI system.


    2. The lactase enzyme is still present which is necessary for digesting the lactose sugar found in milk.


    3. It is full of anti-bodies, probiotics and enzymes not found in heated, damaged milk.


    4. There are no hormones or steroids found in the milk.


     


    It's worth a shot. Many people that have issues with milk/dairy (unless an intolerance or allergy is present), do fine with raw milk. It is the horrible conditions the dairy cows are kept in that warrant the need to pasteurize the milk, which alters the food entirely and makes it sugary, dead water.

  • pd85pd85
    edited May 2015


    Buy Fix Your Gut, it's an ebook with loads of advice on how to eat, supplement and live to heal your gut. http://fixyourgut.com/


     


    The author is on this forum and will surely reply.




     


    I own Fix Your Gut and have worked with John 1 on 1. 


     




    Raw milk from grass fed cows is completely different from conventional milk in many ways.


    1. The fats and proteins remain undamaged from the heating process of pasteurization, which is much easier on the GI system.


    2. The lactase enzyme is still present which is necessary for digesting the lactose sugar found in milk.


    3. It is full of anti-bodies, probiotics and enzymes not found in heated, damaged milk.


    4. There are no hormones or steroids found in the milk.


     


    It's worth a shot. Many people that have issues with milk/dairy (unless an intolerance or allergy is present), do fine with raw milk. It is the horrible conditions the dairy cows are kept in that warrant the need to pasteurize the milk, which alters the food entirely and makes it sugary, dead water.




     


    I'm researching this raw milk more, it's available around me so getting it doesn't seem like it would be an issue. Thanks for this!


  • pd85pd85
    edited May 2015

    Well, I am afraid to report that raw milk is NOT the answer to my problems, and I react to it the same as regular milk in that I have insane amounts of gas all day starting a few hours after drinking it. I actually bought some kefir grains online so I'm going to make my own kefir from the raw milk. If it's lactose causing the problem, making it into kefir should take care of the issue. Otherwise I may have found an avenue to explore, why do I react to milk the way I do?


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