Stevia Exposed As Anti-Fertility Psy-Op

time to wake up and cough the smelly on Stevia? er...coff up and wake the smelly or whatever....


 


this story is an eye-opener, apparently an obscure book in 1970 by author advocates who were researching and plotting


population-control measures cited a tribal herbal remedy used as a contraceptive. the herb in question? Stevia


Stevia  was hailed by overpopulation propagandists as an anti-fertility agent


 


https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=382&v=_Y_ubswux58


 


 


http://www.redicecreations.com/article.php?id=33377


 


btw, if you put Stevia in your coffee enema its even worse.


Gives a whole new meaning to 'wake up and smell the coffee'

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Comments

  • SkeletorSkeletor The Conqueror Worm ✭✭✭
    edited May 2015
    I'm not even going to dignify that with a view.


    David Icke pls go


    Edit: But wait... Is Dave Asprey illuminati...?

    "I know how to despise mere cool intelligence. What I want is intelligence matched by pure, physical existence, like a statue." --Yukio Mishima

     

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  • genao87genao87 ✭✭ ✭✭

    this might be good news for me since i dont want any kids  :)    i can have sex all night long without any worries if this is true....lol


     


     


    but ofcourse,  it is not.   




  • this might be good news for me since i dont want any kids   :)    i can have sex all night long without any worries if this is true....lol


     


     


    but ofcourse,  it is not.   




     


    what makes you so sure that it is not true?  until someone proves that the author of the the report is lying and citing a fake


    source for this, I will consider it to be true.


    Thankfully I avoided Stevia all the while, which is why personally i am such a virile he-man, A virtual Mr. Olympian Gonads


    gold medalist . Thankfully someone found this and prevented me from falling into the Stevia trap.

  • The BioChemistThe BioChemist ✭✭ ✭✭
    There are some studies showing decresed fertility in rats. So it's not a fake story she tells. Possible effect on humans is dufficult to assess since there is lack of reasesch in the area (at least that has been published).

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  • edited May 2015

    1970 was almost half a century ago , so all the people assuming that this very old information would have surfaced before now ...


     


    45 years is a long time, and consider too that there was no internet and that this was , even in 1970, and obscure book.


    Not the sort of thing that genocidal publishers would want to call a lot of attention to.


     


    Stevia as a mainstream consumer item never really existed until the past five years or so. At most ten. Sure Stevia has been around quite awhile in the alternative nutrition circles , but its been a slow transition to becoming the massively popular item that Stevia is today


    One could argue that Stevia is at its peak in popularity today, alongside the implosion of Monsanto and Aspartame and the explosion of the paleo diet.


    So it makes sense that additional information is emerging on Stevia NOW, because Stevia is being exposed to so much more attention now.


    The scary thing is that if Stevia is in fact a depopulation psy-op fad, like many suspect that athe  Soy milk and tofu 'health' fad were, among other things.. then think of what they might  have done to make the Stevia plant even more effective a neutra-desiac/ sterilant.


     


    EhrlichPaul-1970.jpg


    Secret genetic modification of the original plant? Or secret refining process tweaks with added chemicals etc.?


    this fits the mold. Aspartame was phased out, so maybe  they had something even more horrible....


     


    The big Aspartame expose documentary 'Sweet Misery: A Poisoned World', came out in 2004, maybe when they had a finished, genetically-modified Stevia plant ready for roll-out?


  • Bull of HeavenBull of Heaven ✭✭✭ ✭✭✭
    Out of all the possible conspiracy theories, why land on this one? Seriously? So many more interesting ideas and theories to explore and you land on stevia.

    Make, [then,] thyself to grow to the same stature as the Greatness which transcends all measure; leap forth from every body; transcend all Time; become Eternity; and [thus] shalt thou know God. Conceiving nothing is impossible unto thyself, think thyself deathless and able to know all,—all arts, all sciences, the way of every life.  – Corpus Hermeticum XI “The Mind of Hermes”

  • genao87genao87 ✭✭ ✭✭
    edited May 2015


    what makes you so sure that it is not true?  until someone proves that the author of the the report is lying and citing a fake


    source for this, I will consider it to be true.


    Thankfully I avoided Stevia all the while, which is why personally i am such a virile he-man, A virtual Mr. Olympian Gonads


    gold medalist . Thankfully someone found this and prevented me from falling into the Stevia trap.




     


     


    Nothing has been shown that Stevia does it to humans.  Stevia was attacked on this before and all the studies did not conclude anything on Stevia that it was proven to reduce fertility in humans.    


     


    A little history with this...seems there is no end to the accusation of this for Stevia


     


    http://www.mypcos.info/1/q-a/does-stevia-affect-fertility/


     


     


    Im going to leave this little conspiracy alone.   Since I don't even bother taking stevia that much at all.


  • genao87genao87 ✭✭ ✭✭


    There are some studies showing decresed fertility in rats. So it's not a fake story she tells. Possible effect on humans is dufficult to assess since there is lack of reasesch in the area (at least that has been published).




     


    those were EXTREMELY high dosage though from my understanding when I read those.   it is illogical to think that a human woulld even bother taking that high amount dosage of stevia...alot of things can become toxic if taken in high amounts of dosage. 

  • edited May 2015


    Out of all the possible conspiracy theories, why land on this one? Seriously? So many more interesting ideas and theories to explore and you land on stevia.




     


     


    because a hell of a lot of people doing Bulletproof coffee have done the whole Stevia thing?


    Of course its an interesting topic.


     


    The fact that Stevia was proposed as a possible neutrodesiac/impotence herb 45 years ago, and here we are today with Stevia in every health nuts cupboard. To me its an eye-opener.


     


    I do not recall  hearing anything about this before, but then again even if had heard something about this twenty years ago, that was back when I was completely trusting of the authorities on everything.


     


     Also, a warning on Stevia, an obscure product back then,  would have been something which I ignored because it bored me and because I thought the 'authorities' would look after it for me.


     


    In fact I was probably still joyfully poisoning myself with Aspartame back then (1995).


     


    My guess is that because this specific herb was mentioned as a possible tool in reducing human fertility in 1970, then right there you have your reason as to why Stevia is now such a huge product. It most probably is no coincidence at all. 


     


    Not many men using Stevia will be willing to  admit how much money they are spending on things like Tadalafil and Sildenafil and nitric-oxide booster supplements etc.


     


    I have to question the safety of Stevia now, sorry.   My intuition tells me that the original Stevia plant has probably  been 'tweaked' ,  ostensibly to make it sweeter, but the part they won't tell you is that it was probably  tweaked to make it destroy fertility more effectively too.


     


    I never liked the taste of it. No more Stevia for me.


  • steve001steve001

    I suggest doing a little experiment. Eat LOTS of stevia for one whole month. Oncee a week during this month test your ejaculation load. By the end of the month if semen levels drop significantly then you'll know stevia is Illuminati poison.


  • edited May 2015


    Nothing has been shown that Stevia does it to humans.  Stevia was attacked on this before and all the studies did not conclude anything on Stevia that it was proven to reduce fertility in humans.    


     




     


    What a joke, didn't all the 'studies' say Aspartame was safe too?  Don't all the 'studies' say that radical feminism is wonderful and that men


    are walking sacks of evil shit?


     


    Doesn't NASA still claim that USAF pilots rode in a special


    moon car on the moon only about ten years after jet airliners replaced propeller airliners?


     


    What about all the studies saying that vaccines are harmless and that cholesterol is bad and that


    we all should be on statin drugs? Supposed to trust those too?


    I will believe my own intuition here and stay away from Stevia.


  • edited May 2015

    This looks pretty suspicious, note the dates here.  In 1970 Stevia is recommended as a possible ball buster, and lookie  here, by 1971 Coca-Cola had it in its Japanese Coca-Cola:


     


     



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stevia#Discovery


     


    Commercial use


    In the early 1970s, sweeteners such as cyclamate and saccharin were gradually decreased or removed from the formulation of Coca-Cola. Consequently, use of stevia as an alternative began, with the aqueous extract of the leaves yielding purified steviosides developed as sweeteners. The first commercial stevia sweetener in Japan was produced by the Japanese firm Morita Kagaku Kogyo Co., Ltd. in 1971.[15] Since 1971 the Japanese have been using stevia in food products and soft drinks, (including Coca Cola), and for table use. Japan currently consumes more stevia than any other country, with stevia accounting for 40% of the sweetener market.[16]


    In the mid 1980s, stevia became popular in U.S. natural foods and health food industries, as a non-caloric natural sweetener for teas and weight-loss blends.[17][18] The makers of the synthetic sweetener NutraSweet asked the FDA to require testing of the herb.[18] In 2007 The Coca-Cola Company announced plans to obtain approval for its stevia-derived sweetener, Rebiana, for use as a food additive within the United States by 2009, as well as plans to market Rebiana-sweetened products in 12 countries that allow stevia's use as a food additive.[19][20] In May 2008, Coca Cola and Cargill announced the availability of Truvia, a consumer brand stevia sweetener containing erythritol and Rebiana,[21] which the FDA permitted as a food additive in December 2008.[22] Coca-Cola announced intentions to release stevia-sweetened beverages in late December 2008.[23] From 2013 onwards, Coca-Cola Life, containing stevia as a sweetener, was launched in various countries around the world.[24]


    Shortly afterward, PepsiCo and Pure Circle announced PureVia, their brand of stevia-based sweetener, but withheld release of beverages sweetened with rebaudioside A until receipt of FDA confirmation. Since the FDA permitted Truvia and PureVia, both Coca Cola and PepsiCo have introduced products that contain their new sweeteners.[25]


    As of 2006, China was the world's largest exporter of stevioside products.[16]


     



     


    Isn't it a wakeup call that the two biggest companies involved in pushing Aspartame into the American diet (Coca-Cola and Pepsico)


    were the first to develop Stevia?


  • edited May 2015
     

    In 1999 The European Union rejected Stevia's approval for use in food

     

    quote

     

    Early studies prompted the European Commission in 1999 to ban stevia's use in food in the European Union pending further research

     

    Here's an excerpt from their report citing concerns over Stevia targeting the male reproductive system:

     


     

    Fertility and teratogenicity: Leaves of S. rebaudiana have been used by the Paraguayan

    Indians in tea as a male contraceptive. Furthermore, extracts ofS. rebaudiana

    (10 ml of a 5 % extract) given to rats in the drinking water have been reported to induce

    infertility for periods of up to two months (19). A target organ toxicity directed to the male reproductive system (see above for chronic toxicity studies) that subsequently alsocould affect fertility can not be excluded from the animal studies.



    Several studies onS. rebaudiana extracts report effects on the male reproductivesystem, such as reduced spermatogenesis, decreased seminal vesicle weight and interstitial cell proliferation in the testes (16). Administration of aqueous

    S. rebaudianaextracts (corresponding to 0.667 g dried leaves/ml, 2ml/rat twice a day) for 60 days to the rat decreased seminal vesicle weight by about 60% (20). Mazei-Planas and Kuc(19) showed that a water decoction of

    S. rebaudiana extracts reduced fertility to 21% compared to 100% in control rats. Fertility remained reduced (47%) after a 50 to 60days recovery period. However, in most old studies of reproduction performance the

    administered dose has been low and not comparable to those used in other toxicological studies. Furthermore, the administered stevioside extracts have chemically not been adequately described.

    The petitioner states in the application that available results do not indicate that

    stevioside induces embryotoxic or teratogenic effects and this statement is scientifically

    supported by three studies, one in the hamster (21) and two in the rat (22, 23).

    Hamsters were fed with stevioside (500, 1000 and 2500 mg/kg bw/day, 90% purity)

    during which time they were mated and allowed to bear three litters (21). Fertility,

    mating performance, pregnancy, number of fetuses, as well as growth and fertility of

    the offspring were not affected by the treatment regimen. However, teratogenic effects

    were not studied. In one of the rat studies (22), Wistar rats were given stevioside in the

    diet (0.15, 0.75 and 3%, equivalent to 150, 750 and 3000 mg/kg bw/day, 96% purity).

    Males were treated for 60 days before and during the mating period and females for 14

    days before the mating period and for 7 days during gestation. Results showed no

    treatment related effects on fertility or mating performance, and the foetuses did not

    develop any malformations. In the other rat study (23) stevioside (95.6% purity), given

    at doses of 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg bw/day from day 6 through day 15 of pregnancy,

    induced no teratogenic effects. However, when steviol, the metabolite of stevioside,

    was given to hamsters (20 per group) on days 6-10 of pregnancy at doses of 500-1000

    mg/kg bw/day it induced toxicity (24). The number of live foetuses per litter and mean

    foetal weight decreased. The maternal kidneys showed a dose-dependent increase in

    severity of convoluted tubules in the kidneys. The no-effect level for maternal and

    foetal toxicity was 250 mg/kg bw/day.

    Thus, it can be concluded that steviol, but not stevioside, seems to induce

    developmental toxicity at high doses. However, the data suggest that there may be

    effects of stevioside on male reproductive performance. Since stevioside seems to affect

    the male reproductive organ system and also has been claimed to act as a contraceptive

    additional studies are needed and should be performed with the specific stevioside

    preparation for which approval is sought.

    Special studies: In rats there seems to be a vasodilator effect resulting in decreased

    mean arterial pressure and lowering of renal vascular resistance (25). The authors

    concluded that it is possible that stevioside acts on arterial pressure and renal function

    as a calcium antagonist as is the case for verapamil. However, before a final conclusion of possible effects of stevioside on renal and cardiovascular function could be made definitive clinical studies are needed (6) The effects of stevioside and steviol on the carbohydrate metabolism are not entirely clear. Some cited references indicate effects on blood glucose levels and liver glycogen content (5, 26), but results are questionable.

     

    Conclusion

     

    In the safety assessment of the specific stevioside preparation for which approval is sought, several questions of concern were raised by the Committee regarding the specifications of the extracts that had been tested, questionable chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity studies, and possible effects on the male reproductive system that could affect fertility.


  • edited May 2015


    I suggest doing a little experiment. Eat LOTS of stevia for one whole month. Oncee a week during this month test your ejaculation load. By the end of the month if semen levels drop significantly then you'll know stevia is Illuminati poison.




     


    I already told you that I am going to insist that I have the virility of a sex god and am going to claim here to have never once touched Stevia


     


    The booming sales of things like Viagra and aphrodisiacs and fertility boosters , everything from yohimbine to maca to catuaba and endless list ....


    that tells you something is up...er ...not up


     


    So add Stevia to the list of major, major suspects alongside bisphenol A, vaccines, and Miley Cyrus.


  • steve001steve001
    edited May 2015


    I already told you that I am going to insist that I have the virility of a sex god and am going to claim here to have never once touched Stevia


     


    The booming sales of things like Viagra and aphrodisiacs and fertility boosters , everything from yohimbine to maca to catuaba and endless list ....


    that tells you something is up...er ...not up


     


    So add Stevia to the list of major, major suspects alongside bisphenol A, vaccines, and Miley Cyrus.




     


     


     


    Yes me too, but I have touched Stevia. Not recently, it would be a interesting experiment.


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