Why So Low Carbs?

I have finished the Bulletproof Diet book, and one thing I took away from it was that you where not supposed to eat a lot of carbs. I never got the reason though beside weightloss. It seems the whole book was written as if everyone who read it had the goal of going down in weight? I train a lot "amatour bodybuilder" you could say so my goal is not weight loss but rather to increase muscle. Do the carb rule still hold true for me? As long as you get enough calories could those as well be from fat or protein, thus having less carbs and still get strength from training?


Comments

  • edited May 2015

    The BP guidelines are romantically general and are targeted towards a desk jokey, sedentary demographic.


     


    Dave isn't about athletic performance as much as mental, thus the higher fat, lower carb approach.


     


    In your case, I would not cut carbs at all. You need them for performance, strength and body composition. Fat can be used as a fuel, but it isn't ideal and won't help build muscle as well as glucose.


     


    Eat those carbs, be happy and get swole! And listen to Jason he will change your life :cool:


  • Thanks!


     


    This might be a stupid question, but when someone say you should have x% amount of carbs or fat does that mean that for example you want to have 40% carbs, 30% fat and 30% protein that those % are from total calories? So it means 40% of your calories should be from carbs and 30% of your calories should come from fat and protein? And if so how do I know what parts are added to the total calories? Say for example I eat 100g of something that have 200g calories, 23g protein, 10g fat and 30g carbs. How do I know how much calories are from each of those 3 different sources?


     


    I hope this makes sense..


     


    Also are the protein fasting and extra carb days something you should not do if your goal is building muscle?


    I feel a bit afraid of the protein fasting to loose muscle, but from some articles I have read the fear of losing muscle after just a day of fasting might be overstated. Also it might be even more important to clean out the system if you are building muscle and eat a lot of protein compared to "normal" people?


  • WalterWalter ✭✭✭
    edited May 2015

    In general, a gram of carbs has 4 calories, same for protein, and for fat it's 9 calories per gram.


     


    And protein fasting is indeed not optimal if you're building muscle.


  • Just wanted to add that body builders like Arnold Schwarzenegger (and the other from that time era) and strength athletes like Brooks Kubik have been succesfull on a low carb diet. Today the steroid game is much more prominent and a higher carb approach fits better for this purpose so I'm not sure if you have any low carb body builders on the top 10 list.


     


    For hyperthrophy scientific studies do show some benefits for carbohydrates even though it comes to the cost of some addes body fat (therefore the classical bulking and ripping approach). Ironically, for strength gains carbohydrates has a slight inhibitory effect. This is due to carbs stimulate sarcoplastic hyperthrophy (just as most steroids do) which makes the cell grow in a somewhat unpropotional way.


    Which Factors are Most Important for Strength Development? Find out on this episode with Black Belt Nutrition on Super Human Radio 

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  • edited May 2015
    Well, i claimed they use more steroids today. Anyway, even thougt the low carb diet was not a name used body builders of that time they didnt eat much carbs. Arnold did in Europe but when he was braught over by Weider to american he was called potato since he was eating carbs and they changed that and removed the carbs from his diet.

    Which Factors are Most Important for Strength Development? Find out on this episode with Black Belt Nutrition on Super Human Radio 

    The 5 Best & Worst Supplements - A free insider report from Black Belt Nutrition

    3 Steps to become a master Bio-Hacker - Part 1

     

  • You'd think in classic bodybuilder fashion, Arnold's carbs were cycled up and down based on when he was performing for competitions. As all bodybuilders do drop carbs before a show to lose the muscle puff, they also drop all salt and even water which generally makes anyone feel horrible. So yes, bodybuilders do go "low-carb" but only for shows. Context seems to go a short way in fashioning arguments for the low-carb life.


  • Well, I was not refering to the diet a few days before competition. Rather what they were eating at that time. Since low carb was the standard diet among body builders at that time no one refered to it as low carb. The basic diet for training was meat, vegetalbes and fat. Once a week they did a carb refeed (wait, sound like I have heard about that somewhere else :-). Before competition they often skipped the refeed days. Then came the high carb diet in the 80-ties with gainers and stuff (which was critizised by the older users at the time). I used to work with the Weider family so I've a some understandinng of what they were eating during the time. We have had a high carb era for 30-40 years but just wanted to make the point that this has not always been the case.


     


    But dont take my word for it. Listen to anyone of the top body builders from that era.


     


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-EaHRfmgdY


     


    Which Factors are Most Important for Strength Development? Find out on this episode with Black Belt Nutrition on Super Human Radio 

    The 5 Best & Worst Supplements - A free insider report from Black Belt Nutrition

    3 Steps to become a master Bio-Hacker - Part 1

     

  • edited May 2015

    I understand where you're coming from. I just think it is dangerous to say that bodybuilders are low carb around competition and thus always follow a low carb diet as such. No doubt eating a diet low in starchy/sugary carbs will produce a lean physique especially when carbs have been generally higher which is why it is used for bodybuilding competitions. Don't these guys try to get down to like 6% body fat or something crazy like that to get shredded?


     


    That would make me miserable and I wouldn't doubt as soon as their competition is over they are eating donuts asap. Mentally I would lose my mind and completely crash on a prolonged low carb diet, personally I don't believe it is balanced and the "exclusion" of foods creates an unhealthy relationship with food.


     


    So the takeaway is, carbs help performance in the gym, they assist in body composition and also just downright taste good and in turn elevate your mood.


     


    If you are bodybuilding for a competition, cycling your carbs down to the point of the BP guidelines is useful for shedding water weight to get that concentration camp look and win the vanity award.


     


    Also personally, when I was super low carb and training daily my metabolism slowed to a crawl. I began to get extremely exhausted, unable to recover properly and my digestive system shut off. I also developed an minor eating disorder where I was shunning carbs and demonizing anyone who ate them. Now I enjoy plentiful carbs around my workouts, I am leaner, more hungry and my metabolism has switched back on.


     


    Sweeping generalizations regarding nutrition are so dangerous I could write an essay on it. 


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