Artichoke - Spectacular Butter Delivery System

Comments

  • NickatNickat
    edited June 2015

    That looks awesome and yummy. Was that grown in your garden and can we have a few steamed Indian flower roots (coleus forskohlii) and a coffee with that too. 


  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭

    Artichokes are the food of the gods! 


  • @Nickat: Sure thing!  I shall prepare the gust room.


     


    Our artichokes did very well this year.  They produce so many more anthocyanidins than the store bought varieties.  Rather than spraying, we sacrificed our Brussels sprouts to the aphids to attract lady bugs.  There were hundreds of them cleaning up our other crops that we successfully harvested later.


     


    @sparefilms: Agreed!  How have you been fairing with all of the rain this spring?  I am grateful for the raised beds that my wife built from a Pinterest design.


  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭

    We are extremely flooded, so abandoning the planting earlier this year was a good idea on my part. My own raised beds (18" sides on those bad boys) were completely under water, as was the floor of my poor car. What part of the world are you growing those delicious things in?! What cultivar are they??


     


    You can buy ladybugs (and mantises) at certain greeneries and avoid sacrificing your other plants. I'd love to see more landscape and garden hacking going on, but I doubt this forum could handle the influx of information! May have to start a separate forum! How are you testing the anthocyanidin content?


  • NickatNickat
    edited June 2015
    Love the idea of raised beds and hanging gardens. There is something in their design that delights the soul. Something all gardens should do no matter what is grown within.
  • Jason HooperJason Hooper ✭✭✭
    edited June 2015

    The artichoke seeds were from Romania - Violeta, or something.  With these, I can just do a visual inspection to gauge anthocyanidin content.  The more purple I see, the more gene expression has taken place.


     


    Sorry to hear about the flooding.  I live in College Station.  We had quite a bit of rain, but nowhere near the flooding that you had.


     


    We have done the ladybug/mantis thing before, but did not get good results.  Most of the ladybugs flew away, and the mantises were eaten by the birds.  They say that if you release them at night, it prevents that from happening, but we have been attracting them naturally for the last few seasons.


  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭

    The interesting thing about hatching mantis ootheca is that when they mature, the mantises that survived will return to lay their own egg cases in the same general location. If you have an area that is relatively shielded from birds you can just leave the ootheca tied with strings around them hidden in your plants and they will hatch and escape predation. (for the most part, there are nasty things everywhere here in Tejas) I haven't managed to source ladybugs early enough in the year, but we have bushels of them around my place anyways. (they enjoy sneaking in through my balcony and racing around my ceiling for some reason)


     


     


    I can actually see my neighbor's driveway again instead of lake! Finally drying out, so house renovations can continue and then transition to sansevieria cultivation. Any chance of a few photos of your growing setup? Artichokes in Tejas is damn impressive, and that is a gorgeous purple they have there.


  • Our garden is not athletically pleasing.  We converted our flower beds, and some of the back yard.  I am heading out of town, but I will try and take some pictures when I get back and post them.


  • drumminangoleirodrumminangoleiro ✭✭✭
    edited June 2015
    Shit, how'd I miss out on all this garden geekery?! Man I hadn't even thought about growing artichokes....how bulletproof are they anyways?


    Both of my gardens are doing decent so far, complimenting each other nicely, my backyard garden has mostly lettuces, leafy greens, and herbs goin right now, and my other one has lots of brassicas and various squashes, sweet potatoes, and a bunch of other stuff. Things are just getting established, and if things go right I should have a couple crazy veggie jungles in the next month or so.
  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭

    C. scolymus are generally a poor alternative to proper Type II-IV personal armor in dispersing the kinetic force of pretty well any type of projectile. They are however objectively quite delicious, I don't see what their NIJ ballistics rating should have to do with growing and eating them  :mrgreen:




  • Our garden is not athletically pleasing.




    Haha! I'm picturing a garden full of swinging vines and monkey bars.




    Shit, how'd I miss out on all this garden geekery?! Man I hadn't even thought about growing artichokes....how bulletproof are they anyways?


    Both of my gardens are doing decent so far, complimenting each other nicely, my backyard garden has mostly lettuces, leafy greens, and herbs goin right now, and my other one has lots of brassicas and various squashes, sweet potatoes, and a bunch of other stuff. Things are just getting established, and if things go right I should have a couple crazy veggie jungles in the next month or so.




     


    Probably pretty bulletproof. I suck at researching foods for their toxin levels. But I do know that I digest them VERY well, and being a thistle, they contain silymarin! And like other veggies, they host the typical high-flavonoid, high anti-ox capacity, hydroxycinnimates, the works. I want to get my hands on a variety that has the large, hairless heart that you can just pop into your mouth. I don't have time for that shit.

     



  • Haha! I'm picturing a garden full of swinging vines and monkey bars.


     


    Probably pretty bulletproof. I suck at researching foods for their toxin levels. But I do know that I digest them VERY well, and being a thistle, they contain silymarin! And like other veggies, they host the typical high-flavonoid, high anti-ox capacity, hydroxycinnimates, the works. I want to get my hands on a variety that has the large, hairless heart that you can just pop into your mouth. I don't have time for that shit.

     




     


     


    Oh shoot! I read in his book that they are not bulletproof, so I've been avoiding them and I LOVE artichokes. Any more thoughts on this? If they're in, I'm in!

  • Jason HooperJason Hooper ✭✭✭
    edited June 2015

    They have a little bit of omega 6 (30mg/ounce), and high in FODMAP.  Unless you have IBS, you should be fine.


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