Pre-Shucked Oysters

1. Is it okay to eat pre-shucked oysters raw? I read online that they need to be cooked, but I am really hoping that is not true.


 


2. If they can't be eaten raw, is it still okay to get pre-shucked oysters and cook them lightly? Is this bulletproof?


 


 


"Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid."

-Einstein

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Comments

  • Just bringing this back up. Would really like to here some BP opinions on this matter.


    "Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid."

    -Einstein

  • John BrissonJohn Brisson The Legend Formerly Known as Ron Swanson ✭✭✭

    I would not eat any seafood raw because of the chance of parasites. Lightly cook them.

    My book Fix Your Gut, is offered on Amazon for $9.99.

     

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  • jcg3jcg3 ✭✭✭

    I'd be worried about pre-shucked oysters personally. You want to minimize the time between when they're shucked and when you eat them.


     


    If you want to go raw, you probably want to eat them fresh at a high-quality restaurant. Where the oysters come from matters a bit too.


     


    What part of NC are you in?




  • I'd be worried about pre-shucked oysters personally. You want to minimize the time between when they're shucked and when you eat them.


     


    If you want to go raw, you probably want to eat them fresh at a high-quality restaurant. Where the oysters come from matters a bit too.


     


    What part of NC are you in?




     


    I'm in Springfield IL now. I can find about everything I need at Walmart and Aldi (So glad they carry grass fed an grass finished beef). Sockeye Salmon, pork, eggs, and shellfish hard to find unless I go to a specialty food store which tends to be out of my budget.

    "Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid."

    -Einstein

  • Careful with preshucked because the light can ruin the DHA.  I'll steam them until they open a bit


  • jcg3jcg3 ✭✭✭

    I'm sure you can find fresh oysters in IL, but I would say the odds are stacked against you. Nice restaurants might have oysters flown in semi-frequently, but don't go for oysters in a grocery store... or at least I wouldn't.




  • I'm sure you can find fresh oysters in IL, but I would say the odds are stacked against you. Nice restaurants might have oysters flown in semi-frequently, but don't go for oysters in a grocery store... or at least I wouldn't.




     


    Is this because when you see that the oysters come out of a big box, they are not fresh? They have them labeled as wild caught?

    "Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid."

    -Einstein

  • jcg3jcg3 ✭✭✭

    Wild caught and fresh are two different things, both matter.


     


    Wild caught is good - it means that they came from the wild, instead of grown under some potentially questionable conditions on a "fish farm" or "oyster farm" somewhere. Wild means that the food came from an animal growing in a natural habitat, and should contain most of the beneficial nutrients that happen under natural circumstances.


     


    Farm raised may or may not be good quality - it depends on the farm and how they manage it... but typically the risk is that it's not good for you. At the very least, it's not as good for you as wild-caught seafood. And when people selling farm raised fish (or seafood of any sort) compete, it's usually on price rather than micronutrient content. It's still technically an oyster or a fish, so the people doing this may think that it has the same health benefits as wild seafood... but more than likely it doesn't.


     


    And then, separate from wild caught, is whether it is fresh vs. not... that's a matter of how recently the seafood used to be alive. The longer between when something is caught and when you eat it, the more the nutrients might degrade, the more time food-born parasites have a chance to multiply, etc. That's just at a high-level, not specific to oysters.


     


    If something is caught fresh and flash-frozen, it might be ok. That's how I get my fish from the local grocery store...  but I don't buy the fish in a box, I get it from the meat/seafood counter and I try and ask the person who packages it up for me how long it's been sitting there... if it came in frozen or fresh, etc.


     


    If you're buying oysters in a box, it MAY be great, but there's a pretty big risk that it isn't. Coming from a box usually means that it came from a semi-large company, so at the very least you can ask them some questions. Unfortunately, it's just more common for the companies selling frozen seafood like that to not care about the same things that you or I may care about. There should be an ingredient list - if it says one thing ("wild caught oysters") then the odds are better for you...  but maybe still not great.


     


    There are a couple of ways to figure it out - try some, see how you feel. I'd probably steam them and not do raw, but if you're willing to risk it you can certainly try either.


     


    I personally will get raw oysters at a nice seafood restaurant for variety. But unless I knew a fisherman, or had a great fish market to shop at... I wouldn't include it in my regular rotation.


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