Pourover Coffee -- Chemex Vs Kalita Wave

mistamista
edited April 2016 in Bulletproof Coffee

I'm looking to pickup a Chemex or Kalita glass pourover style coffee maker.  I like the idea of using a paper filter to remove some of the LDL-raising cafestol, and it sounds like Chemex specifically uses heavier gauge paper for removing more of the oil content.


 

I think the Kalita has a better design for a more even brew, although it sounds like they go in the other direction by offering a thin filter to allow more of the oils to pass through.

 

What are your thoughts on these coffee makers / filters?


 


[media]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mupueSMHBJQ[/media]


Comments

  • I can't comment on the pour-overs, but I am very interested in the feedback you get. Have you tried an aeropress and paper filters? I tend to use metal, but I like the clean taste you get from the paper filters too.
  • mistamista
    edited July 2015


    Have you tried an aeropress and paper filters?




     


    I don't think I've ever tried aeropress coffee.  I usually get mine from the local coffee shop / sbux or most often out of a cheap plastic cuisinart coffee maker (it'll be nice to upgrade to ceramic / glass.)


  • There was a time when Kalita filters were hard to find, and quite expensive as compared to a standard #2 paper filter, something to consider beyond the initial capital cost. They are easy enough to find now, but that wasn't always the case.


     


    As for Chemex, they are a great presentation device but they are fragile. I've gone through four of them over the years, you have to handle them very carefully.


     


    If you are looking for a cheap, reliable, robust and easily resupplied pourover method, you might want to consider getting yourself a standard #2 paper filter, I like the Filtropa filters:


     


    https://www.sweetmarias.com/category/brewing-equipment/brewing-accessories/filters


     


    And match those up with a Bonmac, Beehouse, or Clever:


     


    https://www.sweetmarias.com/category/brewing-equipment/brewers/pour-over 


     


    Aeropress is good, I've owned one for about 6yrs and it makes a pretty good cup. The great thing about the Aeropress is its ability to make bad coffee taste less bad. 

  • mistamista
    edited July 2015

    I found these filters, which are described as "thicker and a little more rigid than the Kalita 185 filters", which might be the ticket.  Although, they're made in China (unknown quality), whereas the Kalita filters are made in Japan.


     


    I see the Kalita shop filters described as "the cleanest filter paper available" at "17% heavier than Melitta and 24% heavier than Filtropa" -- Kalita started as a coffee filter manufacturing company.


     


    Maybe a beehouse dripper paired with the Kalita shop filters would be the ticket (although, I am partial to the design of the Wave.)  Hmm.  (In the end, they're probably all going to taste about like coffee, haha.)




  • I found these filters, which are described as "thicker and a little more rigid than the Kalita 185 filters", which might be the ticket.  Although, they're made in China (unknown quality), whereas the Kalita filters are made in Japan.


     


    I see the Kalita shop filters described as "the cleanest filter paper available" at "17% heavier than Melitta and 24% heavier than Filtropa" -- Kalita started as a coffee filter manufacturing company.


     


    Maybe a beehouse dripper paired with the Kalita shop filters would be the ticket (although, I am partial to the design of the Wave.)  Hmm.  (In the end, they're probably all going to taste about like coffee, haha.)




    Heavier doesn't necessarily mean better. Without doing precise cupping comparisons between the different weight filters, it's hard to say which produces the better cup once you add the variables of grind quality, age of coffee, quality of greens, roasting method, dosing, pourover technique, etc, etc, and etc.


     


    I extract coffee a pile of different ways, and I've been a coffee geek for over a decade. Every time I think I know a thing or two about coffee I realize I have a pile more to learn, any good hobby tends to play out that way.


     


    if you aren't interested in getting into paper comparisons you could always go with a Kone 2 or Kone 3 (I like my Kone 2), or an Aeropress with a metal disc (It creates a pretty good cup, though I prefer other methods). 


     


    Of course none of this will matter unless you are sourcing quality fresh roast.


     


    So in conclusion... The filters I recommended are a quality product, as are the pourover tools I recommended. You would be into pourover technique for a relatively cheap price. Spend a few months dialing in your technique with a pile of high quality coffees, form a baseline, eventually you will learn what you like. Who know's, you might be satisfied with your initial purchase, or you might want to eventually spend $50 to try another extraction setup. Then you can do controlled comparisons, and so the fun begins. Be careful, that first step towards coffee geekery is easy... but the tumble down the rabbit hole is quite steep. ;-)

  • mistamista
    edited July 2015

    I'm most interested in the oil fraction, where I do believe a thicker paper goes with greater filtration capacity (and a metal filter / aeropress resulting in much less.)


     


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2029499


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10971787


    http://atvb.ahajournals.org/content/17/10/2140.full


     


    The difficult part is optimizing that against the "bulletproofyness" of the filter material and flavor of the extract.  I would be very curious to measure the relative differences between a thin Tiamo paper filter vs something like a Chemex filter, or the spectrum between them, looking at diterpenes in the extract.  (Perhaps there's not much difference?)


     


    http://bjjcaveman.com/2014/12/15/can-coffee-raise-ldl


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemex_Coffeemaker#cite_note-Science_Daily-5 --  "cafestol is the most potent dietary cholesterol-elevating agent known"




  • I'm most interested in the oil fraction, where I do believe a thicker paper goes with greater filtration capacity (and a metal filter / aeropress resulting in much less.)


     


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2029499


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10971787


    http://atvb.ahajournals.org/content/17/10/2140.full


     


    The difficult part is optimizing that against the "bulletproofyness" of the filter material and flavor of the extract.  I would be very curious to measure the relative differences between a thin Tiamo paper filter vs something like a Chemex filter, or the spectrum between them, looking at diterpenes in the extract.  (Perhaps there's not much difference?)


     


    http://bjjcaveman.com/2014/12/15/can-coffee-raise-ldl


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemex_Coffeemaker#cite_note-Science_Daily-5 --  "cafestol is the most potent dietary cholesterol-elevating agent known"




    Been there, done that. All's I can say is dive in and start satisfying that curiosity. The cost of entry is cheap. 

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