Looking For Some Finer Details On Brewing The Perfect Cup!

edited July 2015 in Bulletproof Coffee

Hello,


 


I've been using a Keurig and freshly ground BPC for my daily intake. 


 


Here is what I have been using-


Reusable filter - http://m.plstorebrands.com/vendors/products/2334.jpg


Coffee Grinder -


Either Glass Blender or Immersion Stick 


 


I have been filling the reusable cup to the fill line with grounds and making about 10 ounces of coffee. I do this twice (using fresh grounds each time) and add 2-3tbs of Kerrygold and 2-3tbps of XCT or Brain Octane and then blend. 


 


This fills up my Contigo which I drink throughout the day and leaves me some left over which I drink before leaving the house (start the day off right ;)


 


I've been aware for some time that my Keurig produces an inconsistent cup of coffee. Now it isn't always the machine, but I have been experimenting with different levels of coffee grind as well. 


 


So like most of you I'm in search of the best and most convenient method. 


 


So my questions-


 


1. Hario paperless or Aeropress (recommendations on which type-so many )?


2. How much ground coffee (in tablespoons please) should I be using for either of these(I know that it's more weight dependent, but I don't have a scale atm)?


3. How much water?


4. Best level of coffee grind? I know I have a cheap grinder, but I've been able to consistent levels of ground with various methods (shaking and time)


5. Favorite method of boiling water (favorite electric kettle)?


 


I'm on a budget, but I'm aiming for the best/consistently good experience. Even with my occasional bad cup of coffee, performance has been good and I haven't had issues with IF. 


Comments

  • Bull of HeavenBull of Heaven ✭✭✭
    edited July 2015

    The thing about coffee is that its all about personal tastes.  Experiment, play with the grind and amount of water. Time wise, for me to brew about 12-16oz of coffee it takes about 5 minutes; that is whether I'm brewing with my aeorpress, pour over, or regular coffee machine. 3 or 4 tbl of pregound coffee. Blade grinders take some learning and technique to get right, just pulse it and count the pulses it.


    Make, [then,] thyself to grow to the same stature as the Greatness which transcends all measure; leap forth from every body; transcend all Time; become Eternity; and [thus] shalt thou know God. Conceiving nothing is impossible unto thyself, think thyself deathless and able to know all,—all arts, all sciences, the way of every life.  – Corpus Hermeticum XI “The Mind of Hermes”

  • What provides the most consistent results? In order of importance Performance>Cost/Time investment>Taste


    I'm not a huge fan of coffee so I may not notice subtle flavors etc, but it works for me and I want to make sure I'm getting the best bang for my buck and not making rookie mistakes ;)


    I've read a lot and it seems the Aeropress is harder to mess up, but the pour over is generally thought as better (though it seems like there is more of an investment to achieve these results e.g. fancy kettles with goose necks )
  • 1) Get both, they are cheap.


     


    2) Use an extraction ratio of weighed water to weighed beans, somewhere around 15:1 to 18:1 depending on your personal preferences. An example would be 288gms of water to 18gms of ground coffee providing an approximate 16:1 ratio. Weigh the beans on a cheap ($20) kitchen scale, spoons won't measure weight. Different types of coffee will be lighter or heavier in weight depending on roast level and location of coffee estate, amongst many other possibilities. 


     


    3) See above. Once you get your coffee ground you can put everything on the kitchen scale and tare the scale, then start pouring your hot water until you end up with the correct extraction ratio that you prefer. There are lots of videos online that will show example pourover extraction methods. 


     


    4) Invest in a burr grinder, a blade grinder makes a poor quality coffee. 


     


    5) Anything that gets the water to a cupping temperature of approximately 200F. I use an electric kettle, which I use it to do my slow and steady pourover technique, it doesn't have a gooseneck and I've been using it for over a decade. When it finally dies I'll buy a gooseneck. 


     


    If your focus is on improving your coffee quality, I would put it in this priority:


     


    - Burr grinder


    - Fresh roast coffee from an obsessively quality-focused nearby roaster. 


  • edited July 2015

    Okay, so I've ordered a Hario Skelton as I can't afford a fancier automatic burr grinder at this time. Based on the reviews I found here and elsewhere I should get good results. I currently use the Upgraded Coffee. My local coffee joint has recently began roasting their own stuff so i intend to try that eventually (https://squareup.com/market/cornerperk ). 


     


    I still welcome suggestions on the pour over (looking at the kalita and hario now) vs aeropress subject. I don't really want to buy both :P (not at once anyway). I'm trying to save a few bucks here and there. 


     


    Once, I pick and get everything I need to move away from the Keurig.. I'll find a scale (I think I have one in the abyss that is my kitchen).


  • My personal opinion is... skip the Kalita and Hario and instead get yourself an extraction device that takes a standard #2 paper filter like the Filtropa or Melitta (white) filters. The Kalita filters are much more expensive than the Filtropa or Melitta paper and the Hario is a more demanding learning curve than the standard #2. If you travel a lot, the #2 filters are readily available in nearly every grocery store which is a bonus if you forgot to pack filters or you are sitting at home realizing you are about to use your last #2. Some of this was discussed in a recent thread:


     


    http://forum.bulletproofexec.com/index.php?/topic/16035-pourover-coffee-chemex-vs-kalita-wave/

  • edited July 2015
    I was looking at/for metal filters. I know the Aeropress has one and I've seen cone shaped ones for pour overs. I assume there is one for the kalita and hario?
  • Kalita no. Hario yes.


     


    Kone filter, discussed in the thread link I listed in my last post. 




  • Kalita no. Hario yes.


     


    Kone filter, discussed in the thread link I listed in my last post. 




     


    The price on that filter alone makes me lean towards the Aeropress or sticking with paper. Finely made, but it costs more than all of the pour overs. Thanks for your help thusfar! I do appreciate your time!

  • If you are trying to decide between the Kone or a metal Aeropress filter, I would say go with the Kone. The metal Aeropress solution is good but it's an inferior cup to the Kone (IMHO), I rarely use my metal Aeropress setup.


     


    The Kone might seem expensive, but it's an excellent long-term solution for quality coffee. I put my Kone into an old French Press vessel, been doing it this way for a few years after my last glass Chemex broke and I got tired of replacing them. Once I'm finished the extraction I decant straight into my coffee mug. See the attached image.


     


    https://flic.kr/p/vFfpyE 


  • edited July 2015

    Using an Aeropress to make 16 oz coffee (prior to butter etc)-


     


    Can I make this much in one go or would I need to do two separate runs? Guestimating that I'll be using about 30 grams of upgraded Coffee for 458 grams (16 ounces) of water. If you've got a recommendation for Coffee to total water, please let me know as the internet has a lot of opinions on the matter. If it makes a difference I was going to use the highly praised  inverted method


  • The inverted method is good, you should give it a go.


     


    Ultimately, how much extracted Aeropress solution to hot water dilution is completely up to the end-users palate. It's a personal taste thing.


     


    Let's be honest here, by adding butter (and/or any other things) to the coffee it becomes less about perfect extraction ratios for coffee and more about a caffeine delivery system along with the soluble oils, etc. The beautiful nuances possible from high-quality coffee are diminished or destroyed by all the add-ins. So play around with things for a couple of weeks until you find something that you like.




  • The inverted method is good, you should give it a go.


     


    Ultimately, how much extracted Aeropress solution to hot water dilution is completely up to the end-users palate. It's a personal taste thing.


     


    Let's be honest here, by adding butter (and/or any other things) to the coffee it becomes less about perfect extraction ratios for coffee and more about a caffeine delivery system along with the soluble oils, etc. The beautiful nuances possible from high-quality coffee are diminished or destroyed by all the add-ins. So play around with things for a couple of weeks until you find something that you like.




    So you don't see any quality issues with using that much ground coffee in one go?



  • So you don't see any quality issues with using that much ground coffee in one go?




     


    The Aeropress is good at what it does. I prefer pourovers, as I think it makes a superior quality cup. That's not to say the Aeropress isn't capable of making great coffee. But if you are adding butter, etc the quality issues are overrun by the additives, so the Aeropress will work well and in a much more forgiving extraction range than you might be aware of. 


     


    This is a hard discussion to have without context... a person who has extracted 10,000 cups of high scoring single origins over a period of several yrs vs. a person who has only drank 17 cups of Folgers in their entire life will have a totally different understanding of what coffees potential is. Each person will like what they are drinking, but neither is drinking the same thing. It's hard to tell someone what will work for their palate. It's a self-exploratory journey, so explore and have fun. Not the answer you are looking for I'm sure, but it's the best answer I have. 

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