Why Single Origin Coffee?

I don't quite get why good coffee should be single origin and i can't find anything when searching the internet. I found a brand that has organic single origin coffee that is also local and it taste great, but i'd still like to know why it shouldn't be a blend. Hope someone has an answer!

Comments

  • WalterWalter ✭✭✭

    I thought it was a statistical thing concerning mycotoxins. Same problem with a random ground beef package having beef from thousands of cows. If one is sick it is transferred to a lot more packages than if one cow would be made into a several packages with beef just from that cow.


     


    Don't know if that makes sense, or if it's true at all when it comes to mycotoxins. Hope someone can clarify. 


  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭

    Flavor consistency and micronutrient profile. Climate / elevation / shade / relative humidity / soil composition / competing species can all play a part into what exactly makes up that coffee bean, how it tastes and how its genes were expressed to fill it with all the nutritious goodies.


     


    Regulation and Free Trade/Equal Exchange status is much easier to verify with a single origin product. 


     


    Quality control and quality vs volume business models. Most single origin farms simply cannot compete in volume, so the focus must be on quality to justify the premium pricing. 


     


    Mycotoxins can have something to do with it, as less humid areas will theoretically have less initial mold issues to deal with. Wet processing is the coffee industry's secret weapon (not so secret, actually) against mycotoxins. Single origin suppliers most often process their own beans rather than shipping them off to someone who may have lower standards for quality control, thus resulting in a superior product. Mycotoxins are resulting contaminants, not vectors for increased contamination. They do not themselves multiply. Mold on the other hand, which produces mycotoxins, can multiply and contaminate larger batches. This could be a problem at many stages both at the single origin farm and during shipping. Upon grinding your beans you could contaminate the entire ground batch by evenly dispersing the mycotoxins in the resulting coffee, but that is a different story and is more focused upon the roaster and their testing procedures rather than the origin point.


     


     


    Look at it this way:


     


    Made & Assembled Entirely In The U.S.A. vs Designed In The U.S.A. / Assembled In China


  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭
    edited August 2015

    A timeline of the term:


     


    Coffee Geek - What is Single Origin?


     


     


    a different take from the barista side of things:


     


    Barista Basics - Coffee Blends vs Single Origin


     


     


    one of the most important TEDx Talks ever given:


     


    What you didn't know about coffee: Asher Yaron at TEDxUbud


     


     


    LIFEHACK!


     


    Lifehacker: Brew the Perfect Cup, Lesson 2: How to Select Your Beans




  • A timeline of the term:


     


    Coffee Geek - What is Single Origin?


     


     


    a different take from the barista side of things:


     


    Barista Basics - Coffee Blends vs Single Origin


     


     


    one of the most important TEDx Talks ever given:


     


    What you didn't know about coffee: Asher Yaron at TEDxUbud


     


     


    LIFEHACK!


     


    Lifehacker: Brew the Perfect Cup, Lesson 2: How to Select Your Beans




    Thanks for the TEDx talk. Brilliant!

    Freelance Wordpress developer and wannabe powerlifter
    carlaiau.com

     
  • I roast and drink a lot of single origin coffees. There are so many good reasons to drink SO coffee, one that is important to me is that I really like the diversity that each estate or microlot brings to the cup. Check out this site as a good way to understand what I'm talking about:


     


    http://www.coffeeshrub.com/shrub/content/green-coffee-list


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