Protein Intake For Urine Test

RekaReka ✭✭✭
edited November 2015 in General Discussion

So finally I'm getting a blood and urine test. My protein intake will surely show up in the urine. I forgot what the measurements are, I think it's creatinine.


 


I just find it easier to avoid the discussions about it, I don't want them to believe I have kidney problems. Also it would be good to see what my levels are with the average consumption. So I'm wondering if eating low protein the day before will bring these levels in my urine closer to average. 


 


My plan is to get tested on Monday morning. On Saturday I swim and on Sunday Muay Thai, which will cause some muscle damage, but I won't be lifting during the weekend, and I think of all my trainings lifting is the one that would contribute to higher levels. Then maybe I only eat 30-40 g protein on Sunday, is that going to bring my creatinine levels down? I suppose it all depends on the actual short term nutrition.


 


Thanks in advance to anyone who can advise.


It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

 

Is your social worker in that horse?

 

Success has a price, not a secret.

Comments

  • Refrain from exercise 48 hours prior to your test, take a good K2 and PQQ supplement 24 hours prior, limit dietary protein 24 hours prior, and refrain from other supplements.


  • RekaReka ✭✭✭
    edited November 2015

    Wow, thank you! I'm wondering what's the reason behind the K2 and PQQ in this context. Many thanks.


    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

  • K2 and PQQ have both been shown to raise flomerular filtration rates thus hacking your blood test.  On the down side, if you were to actually have a problem, this protocol might mask it.


  • RekaReka ✭✭✭
    edited November 2015

    To my surprise, my creatinine levels, although high,were still in the normal range. 


    However, I learned a shocking thing about total cholesterol. (No, not that mine is high; of course it is, that's not shocking.) It is the only type of cholesterol that they measure in Hungary in a doctor ordered official lab test! I mean, WTF? What century are we living in?


     


    Imagine this: me sitting in the doctor's office, and he telling me that my cholesterol is shamefully high in such a young age. I think to myself, okay, and wait for the punch line, which never comes. (Although being advised to cook with vegetable oil instead of fat, and eat margarine instead of butter was, in fact, a punch line in its own right.) But the breakdown of my cholesterol levels didn't follow, and then I saw on the paper that they only measured the total, and that's it. And they prescribe people statins based on that!


     


    I mentioned him that I'd lost some weight recently but he just shook his head, no that is not related. Then I figured I would just shut up and not add that I'm training so much that my body is in repair mode 100% of the time, which also raises cholesterol levels.


    I thought of scaring him by mentioning that for a few years I had been eating three times as much fat for a few years as now (in the past 2.5 months). But I didn't want to get transported away in a straightjacket so I didn't mention it, see, I know when to shut up (no, I usually don't).


     


    But then my body still decided to scare the doctor, who, probably worried that I would go into cardiac arrest right there, measured my blood pressure, which is normally in the single digit range, and even a triple espresso spiked with meth and followed by three hours of Crossfit doesn't elevate it much. But now, just to scare the good doctor even more, it registered at a whopping 120 / 70. So the previously mentioned dietary advice was completed by the call for eating less salt. Never mind that my blood sodium was slightly below the normal range. (And never mind that trigs were decent, CRP was low, and my iron is so good that it earned his appreciation, so maybe I'm not screwing up my diet that badly.)


     


    And they don't even measure TSH... Maybe if I asked them whether they measured vitamin D levels, or perhaps LDL particle size, they wouldn't know what that was...


     


    Actually this guy is one of the good doctors. He is better than the average. He shares the waiting room with three other doctors, and he has about three times as many patients there than the others, that's how good he is, much more patients choose him than the others.


    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

  • Wow Reka, that's depressing! I can't believe they only test for total cholesterol. Idiots!

    You know more than 'one of the good doctors' by the sounds of it. Thank goodness you have the knowledge and experience to stick to your opinion and not listen to the terrible advice he gave you.

    Did he honestly tell you to use vege oil and margarine??


    This is what's so annoying about the medical profession, they actually have little knowledge about optimum nutrition. I never go to doctors if I can help it, and I am one! I lost faith in them years ago.

    However if you can find a really good one who's up to date with the latest research and has a special interest in proper nutrition, then they're probably worth it. There aren't any in New Zealand and it sounds like they're hard to find in Hungary too!
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