Making Bone Broth For People Who Have A Job?!

making bone broth is kind of been challenging because it calls for cooking for days on end, I have a big crock pot and cook the beef bones for 4 or 5 days, that's nice and all but end up with maybe 2-3 quarts of broth so find, that if I want to have it regularly I have to make it twice a month which is more often than I want ... so, the obvious solution is to cook it in a BIG pot but I don't feel safe leaving the stove on when I'm not home for 8hrs a day 5 days a week etc... I hear you can use a cumulative time approach where you turn it off but can only do that for about 4hrs and pathogens start to grow so ... wondering if any others have come up with a solution to this??


Comments

  • Serious answer, hire somebody? Even if it's the kid next door for 5 bucks.


  • I use a crock pot and get about 3-4 quarts from each batch.  The trick is to build up a supply of broth in the freezer.  This allows me to skip a week if I get busy.  Also more variety is nice.  If you don't already have freezer safe quart containers, buy some from amazon.


     


    I would not mess with some fancy cumulative time approach. 


  • I have a crock pot that never leaves the kitchen counter. It's either making beef broth or it's slow cooking grass fed beef for me. Short answer: if you can't get volume go for frequency.


  • couple things maybe...


     


    not sure if this would actually help your problem but generally simmering for 48 hours is plenty even for beef bones. make sure you add some vinegar to enhance extraction. 


     


    You can add water during to cook to up your yield if you're getting a lot of evaporation. Just make sure you bring your new water up to temperature (boil it) before adding it. If you use enough bones to start a full pot, topping it off won't negatively effect the concentration of good stuff at the end.


     


    Crock pots are cheap...get a 2nd one and rotate so you always have a batch (or two) going.


     


    best,


     


    Mike


  • great idea! a 2nd crock pot lol!  I actually never thought of that lol ... why do I need to boil the water before adding? i have not been doing that but you're right it sounds kind of necessary




  • great idea! a 2nd crock pot lol!  I actually never thought of that lol ... why do I need to boil the water before adding? i have not been doing that but you're right it sounds kind of necessary




     


    You need to make sure it's up to temp before adding it so you don't cool off the cooking broth too much. invites bad microbes!


     


    its also a really good idea to cool it off in an ice bath when you're done. My practice is to pull out as many bones as I can with tongs or a handled strainer and then pour the rest through cheesecloth draped over a colander. I do this into another metal pot or big bowl or whatever which is sitting in a sink full of ice water. It cools it off very quickly....its a restaurant technique. There's a window of temperature in which microbe growth is maximized. You basically want to have your broth in this temp window for as short a period of time as possible. You'd be surprised how long it take to cool completely if you just stick the pot in the fridge when its done....and it heats up your fridge!


     


    Best,


     


    Mike

  • wow, thanks for that, I basically put it in little pint sized glass jars and put in the fridge right away, think that's still not good enough in terms of microbe growth?




  • wow, thanks for that, I basically put it in little pint sized glass jars and put in the fridge right away, think that's still not good enough in terms of microbe growth?




     


    19 out of 20 times you'll get away with it...until one day you space getting in the fridge right away. The smaller jars are better for sure...more surface area cools faster.


     


    I generally tend to err on the side of safer though and ice bath it. It's really a hold-over from my restaurant days. better safe than sorry....especially with botulism toxin!!


     


    M

  • I went to a meat locker to buy my bone marrow. I got a bag probably 7-10 pounds for $15. Put the whole bag in a kettle (like you used for canning; very tall and large) with some water and vegetables (per the book) and boiled it or near-boiled for 5-7 hours. Ended up with an awesome soup base - bone broth. My $.02




  • 19 out of 20 times you'll get away with it...until one day you space getting in the fridge right away. The smaller jars are better for sure...more surface area cools faster.


     


    I generally tend to err on the side of safer though and ice bath it. It's really a hold-over from my restaurant days. better safe than sorry....especially with botulism toxin!!


     


    M




    AGREED! :)

  • I use a large crock pot 48 hours per batch run it at least twice per bag of bones. I will also use a pressure cooker at the same time which takes 3 hours per batch running the bones at least twice. Add in another crock pot and you will be able to stock pile pretty quick. I cool in mason jars and then freeze. Be carefull not to fill them up all the way or they will explode.


  • botulism? Can someone please explain this risk when making bone broth




  • botulism? Can someone please explain this risk when making bone broth




    Didn't mean to scare anyone...my apologies.


     


    There is no greater inherent risk to making broth than cooking any other animal protein. There is a temperature range (between 40 and 140 degrees F) in which bacterial growth is greatest. You just want to make sure your broth spends as little time as possible in this range...hence my suggestion for cooling it in an ice bath. 


     


    M

  • I don't even understand the reason for the question.

    Bone broth has to be the easiest thing to make with little to no observation. Throw the bones and water in a slow cooker and go to work. You don't have to be home. Let the slow cooker do its thing.

    Why is this even an issue?
  • I don't know of anyone including myself who makes bone broth on the stove since it takes so long. I would never leave my stove on if I am not home. Buy extra crockpots.


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