Ugh, More Infrared Light Confusion

edited January 2016 in General Discussion

I ordered this light


 


http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00N4JE9U6?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s01


 


but it is not so much red as yellowish amber, will I not get the same results with this regarding insomnia and feeding mitochondria or ...??


 


I inquired with the seller because I am considering returning it and he said - "These bulbs emit infrared light (which is invisible regardless of the source) at 850nm, which is the near infrared range most customers are looking for. It is colored red only to help people see where the light is coming out. "


Comments

  • genao87genao87 ✭✭
    edited January 2016

    what is the confusion?   it is a 850nm and 250watt bulb.    Infrared is almost or is invisible to the naked eye at 850nm.    it is your standard infrared bulb.  


     


    the bad part is that it is expensive.   the bulb i buy at LOEWs is roughly only $7.    this one cost $20 plus the shipping charge if there is one.   also it is made in China...i generally try to avoid things made in China...but that is just me.




  • what is the confusion?   it is a 850nm and 250watt bulb.    Infrared is almost or is invisible to the naked eye at 850nm.    it is your standard infrared bulb.  


     


    the bad part is that it is expensive.   the bulb i buy at LOEWs is roughly only $7.    this one cost $20 plus the shipping charge if there is one.   also it is made in China...i generally try to avoid things made in China...but that is just me.




    yeah, I knew it was expensive but the pic made it look like it was red all the way to the screw part, whereas other infrared bulbs are clear towards the base and let out a whiter light ... I'm going to return it ... but the CONFUSION is that from listening to the 2 part podcast with Steve Fowkes I got the impression the COLOR was important as well as the light being infrared for the purpose of aiding sleep etc... is that not true?

  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited January 2016

    Steven Fowkes discussed Both red light and infrared light in the podcast (podcast #95).  


    Perhaps it would be worth you reading (or re-reading) the full transcript, including the comments sections....


     


    & hopefully that will help you decide what benefits you are looking for and hence which type of light (or lights) you need and when to use them... 


     


    Then, to further the discussion in this thread, cut&paste (quote) relevant sections from the transcript, so we can address specifics. 


    Because, you are right, it is confusing, so we need to nail down specifics, when we are discussing red light &/or infrared light.


     


    Here is the link to the full transcript and comments; Hacking Your pH, LED Lighting & Smart Drugs Part 2  


    (search for the word 'transcript' to find the 'Click here to read the transcript' text... & click on it)


    fake it till you make it

  • thanks for the homework lol ... I searched for the word red and infrared, it looks to me like he is using the terms interchangeably, there are about 7 instances of infrared ... he uses the term red much more often ... no clue what to conclude


  • another instance where red and infrared are being grouped together:


     



    Therapeutic Benefits from Local Application of Red Light

    Therapeutic benefits from local application of red or near infrared light to injured tissues have been reported for several conditions:


    • Age-related macular degeneration. The eyes of 200 elderly subjects with age-related macular degeneration were exposed to near infrared light of wavelength 780 nm. Visual acuity was improved in 95% of the subjects; most were able to see two rows lower on an eye chart. Results achieved in two weeks of treatment were maintained three to thirty-six months. [65]
    • Knee osteoarthritis. Application of near infrared (830 nm) light to the knees of osteoarthritis patients dramatically reduced knee pain scores. [73]
    • Herpes labialis. Cold sores around the lips caused by herpes simplex virus 1 were treated with red laser light. Time to recurrence was a median 37.5 weeks in the treatment group, 3 weeks in the placebo group. (Subjects wore masks and couldn’t tell which group they were in.) [61]
    • Hypothyroidism. Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism patients were exposed to near infrared (830 nm) radiation of the skin over the thyroid gland. Nine months later, 48% of the treatment group had been able to stop taking thyroid hormone, and the average T4 dose had dropped from 93 mcg to 39 mcg. In the control group, the average T4 dose had increased from 90 mcg to 107 mcg. [37] Similar results have been reported in other studies. [36] [37] [38] [40]  [41] [42] [43]
    • Cognitive dysfunction following traumatic brain injury. Eleven patients with continuing cognitive dysfunction following traumatic brain injury (from motor vehicle accidents, sports injuries, and an improvised explosive device detonation) were treated with red and near-infrared light to the scalp. They experienced improvements in executive function, learning, and memory, as well as improved sleep and fewer post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms.
    • Cellulite. This is more speculative, but there are indications that red and near infrared light can help reduce cellulite.
    • Hair loss. Use of a laser hair comb led to fuller and thicker hair in hair loss patients.

    from http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2015/06/the-benefits-of-near-infrared-light/

  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭

    yep. it's complicated. & depends what you want from it. 


    i got the impression that Fowkes prefers a spectrum rather than an isolated wavelength (tho it's been a while since i read that transcript).


    fake it till you make it

  • genao87genao87 ✭✭
    edited January 2016


    yeah, I knew it was expensive but the pic made it look like it was red all the way to the screw part, whereas other infrared bulbs are clear towards the base and let out a whiter light ... I'm going to return it ... but the CONFUSION is that from listening to the 2 part podcast with Steve Fowkes I got the impression the COLOR was important as well as the light being infrared for the purpose of aiding sleep etc... is that not true?




     


     


     


    Yes,  the light being red is important because you dont want your body to be blasted by blue or white light at night.   The red light color helps your body/brain control and reduce cortisol which is your "wake up" hormone.  That allows your body's sleep hormone called  melatonin,  to do a better job in making you fall alseep.   Anyway,  you don't want cortisol to be high at night.   You want it to be LOW ofcourse so you can fall alseep faster because there is more melatonin or the correct amount to help knock you out.


     


    You can listen to the 9 minute mark in the podcast where Dave mentioned that he falls asleep faster or better when there is red light on and Steve goes on to talk about why that is,  and that is because it reduces or controls cortisol.


     


     


    Red light is not the only light that helps do this to you.   Orange type lights and yellow do as well.   That is why Dave sells some low light devices that generate a orange/yello type of hue.  It doesnt generate blue or white light at night.


     


    http://www.bulletproof.com/low-blue-nightlight


     


    However this device is not an infrared device, so it wont feed your mitochondria or have any other benefits that infrared light has. It is mainly use to light up your room at night.  The orange hue that it admints wont raise your cortisol and you can see at night. 


  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited January 2016
    "If you do a graceful photo bathing from blue light to red light before you go to bed at night, that’s when your cortisol starts rising. Then, if you expose yourself to red light in the morning, that’s when your cortisol starts dropping. You’re, in a sense, bracketing your cortisol, so that it doesn’t bleed into other parts of your life when it would be a cumulative deleterious effect." Fowkes


    Not so sure on this bit, don't know if red light or infrared light has a direct (or indirect) affect on cortisol. Has this been studied.

    fake it till you make it

  • genao87genao87 ✭✭
    edited January 2016


    "If you do a graceful photo bathing from blue light to red light before you go to bed at night, that’s when your cortisol starts rising. Then, if you expose yourself to red light in the morning, that’s when your cortisol starts dropping. You’re, in a sense, bracketing your cortisol, so that it doesn’t bleed into other parts of your life when it would be a cumulative deleterious effect." Fowkes


    Not so sure on this bit, don't know if red light or infrared light has a direct (or indirect) affect on cortisol. Has this been studied.




     


     


    well Steve is a true expert when it comes to light.   in the morning, the majority of light you see is reddish/orange/yellow light,  then as the day goes on it turns to blue to mainly white light during the day....at night is back to the same reddish/orange/yellow light again.    the body reacts to this when it comes to having its wake and sleep cycle functioning right!  


     


    this is what the body does when being exposed like this when we were living with Mother Nature.  the light helps tell your brain/body that is morning, daytime, and nightime.  after the sunset, you have darkness which ofcourse makes your body start falling asleep.


  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited January 2016


    well Steve is a true expert when it comes to light. in the morning, the majority of light you see is reddish/orange/yellow light, then as the day goes on it turns to blue to mainly white light during the day....at night is back to the same reddish/orange/yellow light again. the body reacts to this when it comes to having its wake and sleep cycle functioning right!


    this is what the body does when being exposed like this when we were living with Mother Nature. the light helps tell your brain/body that is morning, daytime, and nightime. after the sunset, you have darkness which ofcourse makes your body start falling asleep.




    Totally agree on the circadian rhythm aspect genao,

    just not sure about (familiar with) the effects on cortisol... may look in to this further when I have a chance

    fake it till you make it



  • Totally agree on the circadian rhythm aspect genao,

    just not sure about (familiar with) the effects on cortisol... may look in to this further when I have a chance




     


    well im confident it helps reduce cortisol to some degree or helps the body use it as it should be used.  there are other factors ofcourse that affects your levels of cortisol such as carbs or being in ketosis diet.......... seems this is following Dr. Jack Kruse method in a way. 


     


    Dr. Jack Kruse kind of stresses in blocking artificial light that has a ton of  blue and green light that reduces melatonin.   red light doesn't reduce melatonin and melatonin helps reduce cortisol. 

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