Iv Glutathione Vs. Upgraded Glutathione Force

I'm about to get my last amalgams filling out next week. As a way to give my immune system a boost, I'm considering getting an IV, actually a Myers' Cocktail to boost vitamins B, C, & magnesium along with an IV glutathione. My local provider will charge $180 for both. I already have 4 vials of Upgraded Glutathione force, ample magnesium, vit C, chlorella, DE, etc. Does anyone have experience of using one approach over the other? Dave says he gets IV glutathione/Myers' cocktails regularly and he has access to all the supplements he'd want, so I'd think there's some merit to IVs


 


Also, IVs have become a hangover cure.


 


http://www.businessinsider.com/i-tried-hangover-club-iv-drip-2015-2


 


Comments

  • edited April 2016

    I do IVs regularly. Meyers cocktail is great. The problem with IV glutathione is that it can't get inside most cells so it ends up being used by the kidneys and liver exclusively. Which is still beneficial but may not be what you want if you're targeting mitochondria or body wide detoxification. 


     


    Liposomal glutathione (what dave sells) is ok, especially if you have membrane issues but for pure detox acetyl glutathione is best. It's glutathione with an acetyl group attached to it. This makes its impervious to digestion and lipophilic so it can pass cell membranes. Once inside the cell the acetyl group is considered a hot commodity so enzymes cleave it for import purposes (like making Acetyl COA) and the glutathione is free to do its business.


  • Just to provide some clarification, S-acetylglutathione only works in vitro in patients with a genetic glutathione synthase deficiency.  The moment it hits the GI, it undergoes  deacetylation and breaks down instantly.


     


    IV glutathione can cross cell membranes through the transport protein GSH transferase.  They also make an IV liposomal glutathione - which is my favorite, but impractical.  I take Glutathione Force about once a week.


  • googlealchemistgooglealchemist Alchemist

    Would 23me or other similar company be able to tell me if I have that deficiency? Or do you know an average of the population that has it? Other than that, the acetyl version mentioned is actually worthless despite perhaps looking good on paper?


     


    Is your once a week usage of the Glutathione force your ideal dose or just kept limited for budget reasons?


     


    Other than direct IV, a while back I experimented with a subq version as did a group of like minded individuals. Felt like f'ing superman but I ended up getting distracted with other things and discontinued...plus quite frankly, right or wrong, I was concerned there may be some sort of negative feedback loop or other long term problem similar to exo hormone usage.


     


    Would there be any unique benefit or downside to using IV vs subq? Never tried IV so I can't comment, but while for all I actually know the subq route didn't provide all the kinds of benefits that I would want (that IV would) it was certainly no placebo and the effects were not subtle.




    Just to provide some clarification, S-acetylglutathione only works in vitro in patients with a genetic glutathione synthase deficiency.  The moment it hits the GI, it undergoes  deacetylation and breaks down instantly.


     


    IV glutathione can cross cell membranes through the transport protein GSH transferase.  They also make an IV liposomal glutathione - which is my favorite, but impractical.  I take Glutathione Force about once a week.



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