Stuttering

[font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]Hello,[/font]

[font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]This is my very first post and what brought me here was the hope of maybe finding some supplement recommendations for stuttering. I have developmental stuttering that ranges from mild to moderate and has actually worsened slightly this past year (I am now 35). Speech therapy has not worked for me. There is no cure for stuttering and many, many ideas as to what causes it (high dopamine, left and right brain hemisphere miscommunication, psyhosocial stresses, etc). I've read that the following may have some impact on right/left brain hemisphere communication: [/font][font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]Piracetam, Aniracetam, Oxiracetam. [/font]

[font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]I would love to get others' input on this as well as maybe some different advice. [/font]





[font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]Thank you all in advance![/font]



[font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]- Jesse[/font]
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Comments

  • MaverickAzzMaverickAzz Powerful
    Do you stutter when you sing?

    No sorcery, just science. 

  • No. And stuttering is greatly reduced when I read aloud.
  • MaverickAzzMaverickAzz Powerful
    So your brain has learnt to separate those and treat them all individually. Interesting.

    Have you pursued anything along the lines of hypnotherapy? I don't see a reason why the brain can't be tricked into thinking that it's singing all the time.

    No sorcery, just science. 

  • Aaron, thanks a bunch for your replies and interest.

    Stuttering is a fascinating, yet very frustrating disability. When I'm completely alone, I am 100% fluent. As soon as a listener is introduced, even an answering machine, saying my name becomes a challenge. There becomes an issue with timing between the speech portion of my brain.. and my mouth/tongue/vocal chords. Some studies say stutterers are actually speaking with the wrong portion of their brain.

    As I mentioned earlier, there is no cure and speech therapy has a very low long term success rate. Researchers are looking at dopamine antagonists (anti-psychotics) for stuttering treatment, but to be honest their lists of side effects scares men.

    I'm looking for other alternatives at the moment and nootropics are my next area of interest.

    Hypnotherapy is definitely something I could look into.
  • MaverickAzzMaverickAzz Powerful
    I wouldn't look into curing it... just "hacking" the brain.



    The old saying goes "if you can speak english some of the time, you can speak it all the time." So if you are 100% fluent alone, this means you are 100% capable... you just might not know it yet.



    I would try to find a regarded and reputable hypnotherapist and NLP practitioner near you. They specialise in mental manipulation/hacking for immediate results. If you were in Sydney, Australia, I'd refer you to "my guy." There could be 200 different reasons for it, but that can often be bypassed - you already bypass this by speaking fine when you're alone! This means you can do it, your brain just hasn't caught up to the facts yet. Completely normal. I still lose my shit every time my girl yells "honey, watch out!" when I'm driving. I know she's doing it out of love and concern. Could she not yell it? Possibly, but her brain is reacting to perceived immediate danger. When was the last time I was in an at-fault accident? When I was 17, over 13 years ago. Could I not get annoyed each time? Yes, I know it's only coming from a place of caring... but it still triggers me off. Every time.

    We could look at the reasons all day, but at the end of that day, it's still occuring... or you could hack the system so it never triggers. My hack for her - keep a greater distance between my car and the car in front. No more triggers. No more problem.



    Hypnotherapists and NLP practitioners tend to be great at finding those hacks and removing triggers.

    Be warned, there are a lot of quacks in that industry, so you will need to vet them.

    No sorcery, just science. 

  • Have you looked into neurofeedback?
  • Aaron, I live in Las Vegas so I would hope we have a legitimate hypnotherapist in the area. I will definitely look into that. NLP looks really interesting as well. Is that something I can learn on my own.



    For anyone interested, here is a[font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]n excellent article on stuttering and neurotransmitters (this would be the dopamine theory): http://stutter-mind-body.blogspot.com/2010/08/stuttering-and-neurotransmitters.html?m=0[/font]
  • edited January 2013
    Deleted for multiple posts.
  • edited January 2013
    Deleted for multiple posts.


  • Have you looked into neurofeedback?




    Neurofeedback would bee amazing. I could get a baseline as I talk aloud while alone, then place a phone call and compare the results.
  • MaverickAzzMaverickAzz Powerful
    'JReinhal' wrote:
    NLP looks really interesting as well. Is that something I can learn on my own.




    It's something that a lot of places claim they can teach you, but i'd advise against doing it to yourself.

    How many therapists do you know fix their own problems? None. They need an objective look at their own bullshit. The same goes for me and my bullshit, and you and yours.

    No sorcery, just science. 

  • MaverickAzzMaverickAzz Powerful
    edited January 2013
    Multiple post.... geez!

    No sorcery, just science. 

  • Jason HooperJason Hooper ✭✭✭
    edited January 2013
    Call Michael or Leslie Newman at 702-224-5222. Ask them if they have experience in helping people with alalia syllabaris or other speech disorders. This may be fairly easy to hack.



    Edit: never had that happen before.


  • Call Michael or Leslie Newman at 702-224-5222. Ask them if they have experience in helping people with alalia syllabaris or other speech disorders. This may be fairly easy to hack.Call Michael and Leslie Newman at 702-224-5222. Ask them if they have experience in helping people with alalia syllabaris or other speech disorders. This may be fairly easy to hack.




    Ok, I will try giving them a call. Thank you!


  • Call Michael or Leslie Newman at 702-224-5222. Ask them if they have experience in helping people with alalia syllabaris or other speech disorders. This may be fairly easy to hack.



    Edit: never had that happen before.




    Well, I spoke with Mr Newman earlier today. I have an initial consultation this Friday at 2:00 pm. A little nervous as Im really putting myself out there with something that's difficult for me. But I suppose thats how we improve ourselves.
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