Stuttering

edited January 2013 in Brain Hacking
[font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]Hello,[/font]

[font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]This is my very first post and what brought me here was the hope of maybe finding some supplement recommendations for stuttering. I have developmental stuttering that ranges from mild to moderate and has actually worsened slightly this past year (I am now 35). Speech therapy has not worked for me. There is no cure for stuttering and many, many ideas as to what causes it (high dopamine, left and right brain hemisphere miscommunication, psyhosocial stresses, etc). I've read that the following may have some impact on right/left brain hemisphere communication: [/font][font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]Piracetam, Aniracetam, Oxiracetam. [/font]

[font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]I would love to get others' input on this as well as maybe some different advice. [/font]





[font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]Thank you all in advance![/font]



[font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]- Jesse[/font]
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Comments

  • MaverickAzzMaverickAzz Powerful
    Do you stutter when you sing?

    No sorcery, just science. 

  • No. And stuttering is greatly reduced when I read aloud.
  • MaverickAzzMaverickAzz Powerful
    So your brain has learnt to separate those and treat them all individually. Interesting.

    Have you pursued anything along the lines of hypnotherapy? I don't see a reason why the brain can't be tricked into thinking that it's singing all the time.

    No sorcery, just science. 

  • Aaron, thanks a bunch for your replies and interest.

    Stuttering is a fascinating, yet very frustrating disability. When I'm completely alone, I am 100% fluent. As soon as a listener is introduced, even an answering machine, saying my name becomes a challenge. There becomes an issue with timing between the speech portion of my brain.. and my mouth/tongue/vocal chords. Some studies say stutterers are actually speaking with the wrong portion of their brain.

    As I mentioned earlier, there is no cure and speech therapy has a very low long term success rate. Researchers are looking at dopamine antagonists (anti-psychotics) for stuttering treatment, but to be honest their lists of side effects scares men.

    I'm looking for other alternatives at the moment and nootropics are my next area of interest.

    Hypnotherapy is definitely something I could look into.
  • MaverickAzzMaverickAzz Powerful
    I wouldn't look into curing it... just "hacking" the brain.



    The old saying goes "if you can speak english some of the time, you can speak it all the time." So if you are 100% fluent alone, this means you are 100% capable... you just might not know it yet.



    I would try to find a regarded and reputable hypnotherapist and NLP practitioner near you. They specialise in mental manipulation/hacking for immediate results. If you were in Sydney, Australia, I'd refer you to "my guy." There could be 200 different reasons for it, but that can often be bypassed - you already bypass this by speaking fine when you're alone! This means you can do it, your brain just hasn't caught up to the facts yet. Completely normal. I still lose my shit every time my girl yells "honey, watch out!" when I'm driving. I know she's doing it out of love and concern. Could she not yell it? Possibly, but her brain is reacting to perceived immediate danger. When was the last time I was in an at-fault accident? When I was 17, over 13 years ago. Could I not get annoyed each time? Yes, I know it's only coming from a place of caring... but it still triggers me off. Every time.

    We could look at the reasons all day, but at the end of that day, it's still occuring... or you could hack the system so it never triggers. My hack for her - keep a greater distance between my car and the car in front. No more triggers. No more problem.



    Hypnotherapists and NLP practitioners tend to be great at finding those hacks and removing triggers.

    Be warned, there are a lot of quacks in that industry, so you will need to vet them.

    No sorcery, just science. 

  • Aaron, I live in Las Vegas so I would hope we have a legitimate hypnotherapist in the area. I will definitely look into that. NLP looks really interesting as well. Is that something I can learn on my own.



    For anyone interested, here is a[font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]n excellent article on stuttering and neurotransmitters (this would be the dopamine theory): http://stutter-mind-body.blogspot.com/2010/08/stuttering-and-neurotransmitters.html?m=0[/font]
  • edited January 2013
    Deleted for multiple posts.
  • edited January 2013
    Deleted for multiple posts.


  • Have you looked into neurofeedback?




    Neurofeedback would bee amazing. I could get a baseline as I talk aloud while alone, then place a phone call and compare the results.
  • MaverickAzzMaverickAzz Powerful
    'JReinhal' wrote:
    NLP looks really interesting as well. Is that something I can learn on my own.




    It's something that a lot of places claim they can teach you, but i'd advise against doing it to yourself.

    How many therapists do you know fix their own problems? None. They need an objective look at their own bullshit. The same goes for me and my bullshit, and you and yours.

    No sorcery, just science. 

  • MaverickAzzMaverickAzz Powerful
    edited January 2013
    Multiple post.... geez!

    No sorcery, just science. 

  • Jason HooperJason Hooper ✭✭✭
    edited January 2013
    Call Michael or Leslie Newman at 702-224-5222. Ask them if they have experience in helping people with alalia syllabaris or other speech disorders. This may be fairly easy to hack.



    Edit: never had that happen before.


  • Call Michael or Leslie Newman at 702-224-5222. Ask them if they have experience in helping people with alalia syllabaris or other speech disorders. This may be fairly easy to hack.Call Michael and Leslie Newman at 702-224-5222. Ask them if they have experience in helping people with alalia syllabaris or other speech disorders. This may be fairly easy to hack.




    Ok, I will try giving them a call. Thank you!


  • Call Michael or Leslie Newman at 702-224-5222. Ask them if they have experience in helping people with alalia syllabaris or other speech disorders. This may be fairly easy to hack.



    Edit: never had that happen before.




    Well, I spoke with Mr Newman earlier today. I have an initial consultation this Friday at 2:00 pm. A little nervous as Im really putting myself out there with something that's difficult for me. But I suppose thats how we improve ourselves.
  • MaverickAzzMaverickAzz Powerful
    or you could chose to be excited about the potential, if you wanted! image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />



    Rock it, dude!

    No sorcery, just science. 

  • Jason HooperJason Hooper ✭✭✭
    edited January 2013
    Do not be nervous, Jesse. If anything, they should be nervous because you are the consumer and you have the power to walk away at any time. If they are not fully competent, or do not meet your expectations, get up and leave and I will help you find a better place.
  • 'Aaron wrote:
    or you could chose to be excited about the potential, if you wanted! image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />/> Rock it, dude!
    Do not be nervous, Jesse. If anything, they should be nervous because you are the consumer and you have the power to walk away at any time. If they are not fully competent, or do not meet your expectations, get up and leave and I will help you find a better place.




    Thank you both for the encouragement and information! Really means a lot
  • Jesse, I'd love to hear how this goes for you, so just another request to keep us posted. I think that the ways that we can grow and change - or hack and improve - are so far beyond what we know... but we definitely have to go past conventional assumptions and approaches.



    Re your nervousness about the appointment: there's a podcast on the BP website with someone who talks a lot about challenging ourselves, making ourselves do things that are difficult or scary, and that just moving our of our comfort zone and into fear can be so good for us. (Or at least that was the general impression I got- didn't hear the whole thing.) I'll try to find it and post the link.



    Best wishes!
  • MaverickAzzMaverickAzz Powerful
    Fear of change is typically our biggest motivator for staying where we are. Well, actually, that's "fear of the unknown" which has a flow-on effect to change, as we often don't know what will happen once we do change.



    I once hated my health, but I knew it well. I knew I didn't like exerting myself, I knew how long it would take for my shoulder to start hurting, I knew that I should just stay inside and stick to the video games. I might not have liked my health, or my world, but I knew it. That knowledge brought comfort.

    What would happen if I changed? I had no idea. Will people not accept me as much, as I was already generally well liked, or would the accept me more? Would I function better with chicks, even though I already had a decent successes and was rarely single (even though I had many different relationships - but those screw-ups are another story! image/icon_mrgreen.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':mrgreen:' /> ), or would women be less attracted to someone that spent more time in the gym and less with his head in his books?



    Call it intellectual sloth, but one of my excuses was "one of my strong points is that I'm a smart dude and love to read up on, and then talk about, various topics with anyone. More time in the gym means less time reading. What if that makes me less interesting?"

    This is a good example how someone's own bullshit gets in their way. That constant voice that warns you about change... the what ifs.

    Read over my concern again - IT IS RIDICULOUS!

    It's on par with "I don't like that girl, I mean, she's very pretty and funny and likes the same music, but I prefer blondes"

    Excuse me? You just said you'd be happy waking up next to her every morning (pretty, easy on the eyes), has personality, and common interests... yet you're turning down a potential soul-mate based on hair colour WHICH CAN CHANGE NEXT WEEK ANYWAY!

    It's another example of the bullshit we tell ourselves so we stay away from change. It had nothing to do with blondes, it's the first excuse his subconscious thought of that sounded rational, in order to keep him safe from the unknown.



    Sometimes it helps to soundboard and bounce ideas off of someone. Make them ask you "if you change this one aspect about you, what else will change?" and then make them give the follow-up question "really? or is that just your own bullshit?" and be honest. If you end up with the pro's and con's suggesting you should change, then you should start feeling eager and excited for it - for every single reason you already listed.



    I changed my health. I was with my girl before I changed, but guess what? Our relationship is much better now! Mainly because not only my physical health has improved, my mental has too! I feel a million times better than I did before. Every facet of life has improved. I decided the excess energy and confidence needed more outlets - so I'm studying again and about to take up BJJ too.

    My mate that didn't go for the blonde? He's still single. And miserable. In the same shitty studio apartment.



    Change is up to you and the evidence is overwhelming that it's a good thing.

    It also has a habit of changing everything else too... which, as we've already determined, is also a good thing. image/icon_cool.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':cool:' />

    No sorcery, just science. 



  • Jesse, I'd love to hear how this goes for you, so just another request to keep us posted. I think that the ways that we can grow and change - or hack and improve - are so far beyond what we know... but we definitely have to go past conventional assumptions and approaches.



    Re your nervousness about the appointment: there's a podcast on the BP website with someone who talks a lot about challenging ourselves, making ourselves do things that are difficult or scary, and that just moving our of our comfort zone and into fear can be so good for us. (Or at least that was the general impression I got- didn't hear the whole thing.) I'll try to find it and post the link.



    Best wishes!

    'Aaron wrote:


    Fear of change is typically our biggest motivator for staying where we are. Well, actually, that's "fear of the unknown" which has a flow-on effect to change, as we often don't know what will happen once we do change.



    I once hated my health, but I knew it well. I knew I didn't like exerting myself, I knew how long it would take for my shoulder to start hurting, I knew that I should just stay inside and stick to the video games. I might not have liked my health, or my world, but I knew it. That knowledge brought comfort.

    What would happen if I changed? I had no idea. Will people not accept me as much, as I was already generally well liked, or would the accept me more? Would I function better with chicks, even though I already had a decent successes and was rarely single (even though I had many different relationships - but those screw-ups are another story! image/icon_mrgreen.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':mrgreen:' /> ), or would women be less attracted to someone that spent more time in the gym and less with his head in his books?



    Call it intellectual sloth, but one of my excuses was "one of my strong points is that I'm a smart dude and love to read up on, and then talk about, various topics with anyone. More time in the gym means less time reading. What if that makes me less interesting?"

    This is a good example how someone's own bullshit gets in their way. That constant voice that warns you about change... the what ifs.

    Read over my concern again - IT IS RIDICULOUS!

    It's on par with "I don't like that girl, I mean, she's very pretty and funny and likes the same music, but I prefer blondes"

    Excuse me? You just said you'd be happy waking up next to her every morning (pretty, easy on the eyes), has personality, and common interests... yet you're turning down a potential soul-mate based on hair colour WHICH CAN CHANGE NEXT WEEK ANYWAY!

    It's another example of the bullshit we tell ourselves so we stay away from change. It had nothing to do with blondes, it's the first excuse his subconscious thought of that sounded rational, in order to keep him safe from the unknown.



    Sometimes it helps to soundboard and bounce ideas off of someone. Make them ask you "if you change this one aspect about you, what else will change?" and then make them give the follow-up question "really? or is that just your own bullshit?" and be honest. If you end up with the pro's and con's suggesting you should change, then you should start feeling eager and excited for it - for every single reason you already listed.



    I changed my health. I was with my girl before I changed, but guess what? Our relationship is much better now! Mainly because not only my physical health has improved, my mental has too! I feel a million times better than I did before. Every facet of life has improved. I decided the excess energy and confidence needed more outlets - so I'm studying again and about to take up BJJ too.

    My mate that didn't go for the blonde? He's still single. And miserable. In the same shitty studio apartment.



    Change is up to you and the evidence is overwhelming that it's a good thing.

    It also has a habit of changing everything else too... which, as we've already determined, is also a good thing. image/icon_cool.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':cool:' />




    WOW! Incredible support. Thank you both!

    Will definitely keep you all updated. I figure even if this does not affect my stammering, I'm sure it will still have a positive impact on my life.
  • MaverickAzzMaverickAzz Powerful
    I hope so, mate. Now go and kick some proverbial ass!!

    No sorcery, just science. 

  • edited January 2013
    Well, I went to see the neurofeedback folks today. It's a husband and wife. We talked at length about my stuttering, they told me about their decent success rate. I saw the software they used as well we the sensors they place at certain points on the skull. The price was a little hard to swallow - $125 per session or $90 per session is 20 are purchased. I purchased 20. The first session starts tomorrow. I will be going twice a week.
  • Jason HooperJason Hooper ✭✭✭
    edited January 2013
    So ninety dollars per hour? Not exactly Cinimark, but not too bad if you get the results you are after. I am going to feel like crap if you do not.
  • edited January 2013


    So ninety dollars per hour? Not exactly Cinimark, but not too bad if you get the results you are after. I am going to feel like crap if you do not.




    Haha. No no no, don't feel like crap. Ultimately it was my decision. Im just grateful to have a forum like this where people like you and Aaron share your knowledge. I put all $2000 on a credit card and that should cover 20 sessions. The first one is tomorrow which will be the only 2 hour session.



    Oh, I found this today on a pretty reputable psych website:

    http://psychcentral.com/news/2012/10/26/neurofeedback-trains-brain-waves-restores-brain-function/46720.html
  • RodRod The Rodfather
    edited January 2013
    I was hoping add to the conversation but you got everything set for now, I want to wish good luck and stay positive, we'll be here waiting to hear from you. image/icon_razz.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':-P' />

    Everything I learned about "biohacking" has been baby steps to "circadian biology", that's where the real biohacking comes in. You can buy a bunch of cool shit to "hack" but if you don't have context, you're not winning. Paleo is just a brand now and too many have opinions, it's on you to read and reread the material to not only find truth but to connect the dots. Much love to everyone who has helped me on my journey for restoring my health, please keep in touch. Feel free to message me with health questions [email protected] 

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