Drastically Reducing Anxiety If Money Is No Concern

MikeOceanMikeOcean
edited March 2016 in Cognitive Performance

I'm the President of a fast-growing company and recently starting experiencing anxiety/mini-panic attacks in meetings. Although I had dealt with anxiety earlier in my life, this hit somewhat out of the blue and doesn't seem to have been trigged by any events or particular stressors (other than the normal ones associated with running a company).


 


A lot is at stake and so I'm prepared to do anything I can to overcome this. I am in a very fortunate situation where I can spend money (say, up to $10K) on different approaches here if need be (I consider myself blessed in that regard and realize many people cannot do so). A few ideas I've had:


  • Gets lots of massages to remove as much tension/stress from the body as I can.
  • Invest in therapy to try to root out the cause(s) of this anxiety.
  • Eat really well, take supplements, etc. 

What else should I consider here that can help with this (ideally quickly)? I am very appreciative of any ideas that I can try. Thanks so much.


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  • DManDMan Master of Arts ✭✭✭

    heart math inner balance training.


    pushing limits. challenge your anxiety... start slowly and find the courage. and then learn that there is more than anxiety, courage. there are higher levels of consciousness. like love.


     


    btw did you find the root causes? I assume it has something to do with your parents behaviors...


    understand that money is not a tiger trying to eat you just now...;P it is a feeling. a virtual signal. a light that is blinking and not necessarily a reality. just you on the inside. look at yourself from above.


    maybe there is a reason for why that feeling shows up. prepare for the meetings. understand the problem and answer all the questions before those meetings so that you just have to act and stop thinking. write it down. free yourself of inner conflicts and get into a state of coherence.


     


    https://www.ted.com/talks/kelly_mcgonigal_how_to_make_stress_your_friend?language=de


    https://www.ted.com/talks/chris_hadfield_what_i_learned_from_going_blind_in_space


    May you be well, may you be happy, may you be healthy, may you be loved.

    How much to eat:
    advanced | How to train: bulletproof training | HRV: HRV FOR TRAINING HRV BASICS What Affects HRV | Brain  & Memory dual n back training advanced training

     

     

  • Thanks DMan. I've actually done a lot of Inner Balance training recently (very coincidentally I believe, my anxiety flared up a few weeks after starting Inner Balance training this year...). I can fairly easily get myself into green and keep myself there so long as I am focusing on my breathing. However, if I'm doing it while working (e.g., on my laptop), I find I'm often dipping into blue or red. Any suggestions for that? 


     


    I also can't wear the sensor all the time and I've been trying to find a solution that would combine a chest strap (which I could wear continuously) with an interface like Inner Balance so I can get a sense of when anxiety might be starting up (i.e. my HRV might be lowering).


     


    And I appreciate your advice about meeting prep. That said, I don't think that's the problem. The underlying feeling is "How would it look to others if I had to bolt out of this meeting right now?" That ends up triggering a mild panic cycle. The anxiety also hinders my communication abilities which, in turn, worsens the anxiety.


     


    Looking forward to any other thoughts on this. Diet, exercise, deep breathing all help but I'm looking for other solutions that may more quickly snap me into shape.


  • DManDMan Master of Arts ✭✭✭

    Up the challenge level. There are 4.


     


    You know if that's the problem, try it and see what happens. :D Maybe it's your parents who did run a company as well and were always stressed about stuff like that?


    Did you watch both videos? Try making stress your friend.


     


    But I think you should just try and see what happens. xD Maybe do it in an unimportant meeting. Maybe even set one up for that and then quit early and reschedule.


     


    You will not always be in coherence and that is fine. Being not in coherence means you have to solve problems.


     


    there must be a a cause for it since it always happens in the same setting if I read it correctly. A therapist might be a good option to help you figuring it out.

    May you be well, may you be happy, may you be healthy, may you be loved.

    How much to eat:
    advanced | How to train: bulletproof training | HRV: HRV FOR TRAINING HRV BASICS What Affects HRV | Brain  & Memory dual n back training advanced training

     

     

  • How is your heart rate during the attacks?

    Which Factors are Most Important for Strength Development? Find out on this episode with Black Belt Nutrition on Super Human Radio 

    The 5 Best & Worst Supplements - A free insider report from Black Belt Nutrition

    3 Steps to become a master Bio-Hacker - Part 1

     

  • Another interesting piece of information would be how is your blood sugar during the attacks?


     


    Try some ashwaghanda. It works really well. Jarrow makes a good one but I'm sure there are others just as good.


    "Men are more easily wooed by imagination then by science" - Will Durant

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  • If you are bordering on mini-panic attack/meltdown in meetings, no amount of Heart Math/Inner Balance/herbs or butter in your coffee is going to create an immediate solution. Not knowing anything about you, your business, or how 'critical' it is that you run the meetings... here's what I would spend the $10K on.


     


    Hire a PM with excellent credentials (for your own peace of mind as well as your employees), spend a few days getting them familiar with operations/strategic (after signing an NDA of course), then let them run the meetings. If they are a good PM it's quite likely they will be better at it than you are, unless you have a couple of decades as a dedicated PM.


     


    You can step back and oversee from a satellite view, get in touch with your employees to see if anything is being missed, and spend part of each day reconnecting with yourself/family/friends via healthy outdoor activity and/or de-stressing outlets like yoga/meditation/scratching behind your dog's ear.


     


    If the PM is really good, they will not only act as a pressure relief valve in the short term but they may turn out to be a valuable enough resource that they give a good ROI in the mid to long term. 

  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited March 2016
    staylor, a PM to me, in a work role context, is a Project Manager, but I guessing your pm stands for something different ?

    (plus the 10k might be a few weeks contract)

    fake it till you make it

  • staylorstaylor ✭✭
    edited March 2016

    Daz, you are right, I slipped into geek-speak and should have said Project Manager.


  • Interesting challenge.


     


    Good replies as well.


     


    IMO, based on limited information, I doubt the massages would do anything.  Seems mental.


     


    I'm not a "therapy from a trained stranger" fan (and that usually takes a while I've heard), but self focused therapy is amazing.  My first guess would be upbringing which usually involves parents and/or siblings.  Next guess would be spouse or co-workers being a cause of stress.  I am a fan of finding a way to "love/whatever you want to call it" your stress triggers.  Even if you have to play a game with yourself to make it work in your head.


     


    The good diet, exercise, supplements will assist in keeping your hormones in the right place.


     


    Delegating is a solid idea if it comes to that point, but most likely it is in your mind and needs digging out and making peace with, which maybe you can do on your own with focus.


     


    Interesting stuff...hope you keep us posted with your progress. 


    Seeing through the chaotic.
  • Woke up to this article and thought of this thread...


     


    "We never intended to be the Richard Dawkins of mindfulness — but, because of our book, we seem to have started a public debate about its downsides nonetheless.


     


    Our approach was to go through almost half a century of scientific evidence and tease out fact from fiction when it comes to beliefs about various meditative practices. As it happens, most of the media hype about mindfulness as a cure-all is not grounded in scientific evidence. But it was a chapter on the dark side of meditation that caused a stir, where we described the unexpected or exacerbated mental health problems that have been experienced and the potential misuse of meditative techniques (such as by the military). Our conclusion was that meditation might benefit some individuals, but not all — and it might be unhelpful for others.


     


    We don’t yet know the reasons for these individual differences. There is very little research on why meditation doesn’t work in the same way for everyone and how it might cause emotional difficulties. One hypothesis is that meditation amplifies emotional problems that are lying hidden under the surface. Think of an individual who went through a traumatic experience in early life but forgot about it, only to find themselves reliving it as an adult trying out mindfulness meditation. Since the book came out we have listened to this and other stories, often via email or our book’s Facebook page, at other times from callers during live radio interviews. One of the most poignant accounts came from a journalist who interviewed us. She had been on a weekend meditation retreat with a friend who had a history of suffering from depression. Coming out of the retreat, they walked together to the railway station and, unexpectedly, this friend jumped on to the rail tracks as a train was speeding by.


     


    Researchers like the amplification hypothesis because meditation comes out clean. The problem was already there and meditation only brought it out into the open. But there is a competing explanation, which we call the rattling hypothesis. We received a number of letters from long-term meditators supporting this explanation. According to them, the aim of sitting down and going within is to rattle the ego, to shake our sense of who we think we are, in order to move beyond self-centered concerns.


     


    When techniques like mindfulness were adapted into a psychological, secular model, this rattling function was brushed under the carpet. But this was bound to resurface, as adverse effects can happen to anyone. In our book, we report the account of a psychiatrist who had to fight to keep his mental sanity after a meditation experience in which he felt the boundaries of his ego dissolve. This mystical experience led to a serious rattling of the self, which he was able to process in part because of his mental health training, but mainly because he had good social support, including a meditation teacher who explained that what he was going through was perfectly normal.


     


    Unfortunately, mindfulness teachers (who are currently unregulated) are generally unaware of potential ego-rattling effects, nor possess the mental health training to deal with these situations. We have received emails and letters from individuals who were feeling anxious during mindfulness courses and this was dismissed by teachers as ‘built up stress’ that would go away.


     


    But what happens when it doesn’t? This was the case of Gareth, who tried out a mindfulness course because he was having some trouble falling asleep. While doing the course he became aware of negative thoughts, which wouldn’t disappear no matter how much he accepted and tried to ‘let them go’. After eight weeks his anxiety levels had increased from something barely noticeable to an everyday problem which he found hard to manage. ‘Is it my fault?’ he wanted to know — and this is a common question for those who don’t feel the well being, relaxation, happiness kick one might expect to get when meditating. Let’s not add stigmatization to the list of adverse effects. It is no one’s fault when meditation goes wrong.


     


    The problem is how we have come to think of mindfulness meditation as a practice that we should all engage in, because it will do us all good — and only good. This is a religious, not a scientific view (and to be fair, most religions actually tend to be cautious about the use of meditation).


     


    There are many unanswered questions about the effects of meditation. Mindfulness, in particular, is portrayed as a universal ability to be ‘in the here and now’ — how can you not want that for yourself? Well, the bad news is that it doesn’t work for everyone.


     


    But this isn’t necessarily bad. For one, there are many ways of ‘being present’ — meditation is just one of them. There are plenty of other activities that we can do for a sense of increased awareness and to feel ‘in the moment’ (and which may also help to reduce stress and improve mood), such as walking, swimming, talking to a friend, singing, dancing. The list is endless.


     


    Another good thing is that it challenges simplistic notions of our minds as a more or less resilient muscle, which the mindfulness industry would encourage us to simply ‘exercise’ in order to achieve ‘mental fitness’. The variety of experiences (pleasant or difficult) stimulated by meditation portrays mental life rather as a combination of subtle and complex processes with various layers. Instead of dedicating more research to promoting a stereotypical image of meditation as a universal boon, we need to be mindful of how it affects people in different ways and try to understand why that is."


     


    https://health.spectator.co.uk/what-mindfulness-gurus-dont-tell-you-meditation-has-a-dark-side/?utm_content=buffer95234&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer


    Seeing through the chaotic.
  • Thanks for all the replies. A few follow-ups here:


     


    1 - While I appreciate the thoughts around delegation, I don't think that's the solution for me. I need to be able to be in front of people a big chunk of my day and so am looking for potential solutions that help with anxiety in those situations.


     


    2 - I haven't measured heart rate during those situations. I've been searching for a good solution for that. Perhaps a bluetooth chest monitor?


     


    3 - I think breathing is highly related to what's going on. After doing some more research I wonder if a lot of the work I was doing on deep diaphragmatic breathing in the recent weeks didn't trigger something here. I started looking into Buteyko breathing and a lot of it seems to intuitively relate to what I'm experiencing. I've found myself at various times almost gasping for breath and the fact that I did a lot of InnerBalance/HRV work right before I started experiencing these mild panic attacks for the first time in years seems like it could be related. I'm going to start a separate thread on this one so as not to get lost in the rest of this.


     


    Magnesium seems to be helping as well. Just tricky to balance the GI impact of a lot of Magnesium. Also, did a floatation chamber the other day and probably felt more relaxed after that than anything else I've done so far. That seems like something I could probably do a lot of considering the circumstances.


     


    Thanks a lot and please feel free to keep the suggestions coming.


  • My experience working with anxious NYers all day is that the more they fear anxiety the more power it has. There's no magic pill.  (If you've found one PLEASE let me know, I'm serious I always want to know what people find that helps!)


     


    Here's what I would encourage you to do:


    1.  Practice not caring whether you're anxious or not.  Remember anxiety is a strategy the body is using to "problem solve" (ineffectively) and to gently remind yourself that whether it's  there or not you're going make happen what needs to happen during the meeting.  


    2.  I agree with the above that there's usually a belief in place, a fear, that's old but rears it's head in certain environments.  Be curious about what it is rather than trying to will it away.  


    3.  Do neurofeedback.  The NO system recommended on this site, I use in my practice, and highly recommend.  But it has to be 6 months of weekly.  (My observation is that people don't use it long enough to let the entire system change.  It's a life-transforming system, but you have to give it time to do it's job on your CNS, beliefs, behaviours, emotions, relationships.  


    4. Get a blood work-up by a functional medicine doctor.  Worth every penny to find out if you have vitamin, mineral, neuro-transmitter issues.....


     


    Hope that helps,


    Natalie


    Natalie Baker, LMHC



  • My experience working with anxious NYers all day is that the more they fear anxiety the more power it has. There's no magic pill.  (If you've found one PLEASE let me know, I'm serious I always want to know what people find that helps!)


     


    Here's what I would encourage you to do:


    1.  Practice not caring whether you're anxious or not.  Remember anxiety is a strategy the body is using to "problem solve" (ineffectively) and to gently remind yourself that whether it's  there or not you're going make happen what needs to happen during the meeting.  


    2.  I agree with the above that there's usually a belief in place, a fear, that's old but rears it's head in certain environments.  Be curious about what it is rather than trying to will it away.  


    3.  Do neurofeedback.  The NO system recommended on this site, I use in my practice, and highly recommend.  But it has to be 6 months of weekly.  (My observation is that people don't use it long enough to let the entire system change.  It's a life-transforming system, but you have to give it time to do it's job on your CNS, beliefs, behaviours, emotions, relationships.  


    4. Get a blood work-up by a functional medicine doctor.  Worth every penny to find out if you have vitamin, mineral, neuro-transmitter issues.....


     


    Hope that helps,


    Natalie




     


    All solid points.

  • I highly recommend seeing a feldenkrais practitioner and perhaps attending some lessons to help release nervous tension from your body.  Massages will only provide temporary relief.  Ultimately you must help your muscles and nervous system to reorganise and get used to being in more comfortable positions.


     


    I also agree with the above comment about neurofeedback.  Make sure it is deep brain Loreta feedback as this is more effective than other types.


     


    Chinese medicine can be useful for anxiety with xiao yao wan a classic herbal formula for stress and anxiety.


     


    I've started keeping a journal where I can write down any thoughts and really open up and I find it so therapeutic.


     


    Perhaps a psychotherapist could be of benefit as well, to start the bring some of the roots of your anxiety to light.


     


    Acupuncture can also be very helpful for anxiety.


     


    Best of luck buddy


     


    Mark


  • I would recommend that you look at cranial electrotherapy (CES).  The biggest effect CES has on a person is a decrease in the metabolic activity of the right supramarginal gyrus.  This is the part of your brain that makes you aware of how you feel right now, and that makes that information very important to you.  When you turn down the volume on the RSMG, the emotion that is being brought to your attention becomes information rather than a drive toward action.  It puts thinking in charge of feeling. 


     


    Imagine having your manhood threatened in the boardroom for some reason.  Rather than reacting to being threatened, you just note that somebody has challenged you, and how interesting that is.  Now, what is a good course of action?  It's an entirely different experience from having your adrenals dump coldness into your belly and feeling the sweat rise up.


     


    If you know what a placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical study is, the following video should make sense.  He also goes into what a meta-analysis is and what it means for a treatment to be reliably repeated over and over.


     



     


    Far less than your $10K budget, should be noticeable in two weeks, and you should have gotten whatever you're going to get out of it within six weeks.  In my mind, CES is a must-do for everyone with anxiety.


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