Best Ways To "see Stress Coming"

I have a pretty intense schedule and was seemingly doing really fine with it. Then, out of the blue, I got hit with some sizable anxiety and mild panic attacks. Went to see a functional medicine doc and she thinks it's probably adrenal fatigue (is giving me a bunch of tests to confirm).


 


My question is what biomarkers could have helped me understand if I was "running too hot" prior to experiencing physical symptoms? I'm taking it easier now but would like over time to work back to my prior schedule. But I want to minimize the risk that I over-do it and harm my health.


 


Any thoughts on tests I can run or other things I can do (e.g., resting HR, HRV) to assess where I am even when I don't feel like I'm burning myself out?


Comments

  • Being consistent with resting HR and morning HRV are probably your best bets for getting a heads up on changes you wouldn't otherwise notice. Otherwise, I think consistent physical practices like lifting weights or a consistent yoga routine are good ways to check in. It's easier to fool yourself if you never push yourself physically. I don't think blood markers would be very practical or useful in this case.
  • J-rockJ-rock
    edited March 2016

    I can predict to fall victim to stress during the day when I lack sleep, when I start getting lazy with my exercise routine, or when I ate too much cheat food from the night before. I second with drummin on exercise. Exercise is a good way to help keep stress in check. Just make sure you're eating enough and eating the right foods to fuel your workout and help with recovery.


  • Not just to keep stress at bay but to identify it, like when you can't lift as much as you usually can, or yoga poses reveal tension/lack of strength/etc...or whatever it is you do consistently where you challenge yourself.


  • Not just to keep stress at bay but to identify it, like when you can't lift as much as you usually can, or yoga poses reveal tension/lack of strength/etc...or whatever it is you do consistently where you challenge yourself.




     


    I get what you're saying.

  • I'd recommend Marco Altini's HRV4Training app for the HRV, I've been using it more recently over others because of a couple of benefits:


    1. It compares you to the population (based on studies, and the population using the app)


    2. It uses the original rMSSD score in advanced mode - many of the other apps use a modified score, so you are effectively locked in to the app for comparison purposes (you can't compare your scores with other apps if you want to switch, so you lose your history)


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  • edited March 2016


    I'd recommend Marco Altini's HRV4Training app for the HRV, I've been using it more recently over others because of a couple of benefits:


    1. It compares you to the population (based on studies, and the population using the app)


    2. It uses the original rMSSD score in advanced mode - many of the other apps use a modified score, so you are effectively locked in to the app for comparison purposes (you can't compare your scores with other apps if you want to switch, so you lose your history)




     









    I'll check out the app thanks.


     


     


     


    To OP:


    I must admit I fall victim to this as well in the sense that I never seem to feel "stressed out." I'll be slamming along and then I'll slowly watch my sleep and digestive health fall to pieces while still being in an overall calm, pleasant mood. It's weird, but those are the signs I watch out for.


     


    It's like if you never feel pain so you just keep your hand on the stove and wonder why your fingers start to fall off.


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  • In thinking through the question a bit more, sleep quality could also be a factor. Poor sleep could lead to stress, anxiety and fatigue. At the same time, those things could lead to poor sleep. I finally downloaded Sleep Cycle so hopefully between that, HRV and resting HR, I'll have more visibility. I'm also going through a series of panels with a functional MD to establish a baseline so maybe that's something I'll end up doing every six months or so.


  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited March 2016

    i'll link to the normalbreathing site again to quote their list of some early signs; 



    Early signs and symptoms of anxiety disorders


    - Dry mouth in the morning

    - Sleeping on one's back

    - Agitated sleep or nocturnal sleep problems

    - Sighing or sniffing air

    - Mouth breathing during exercise/walking


    source



     


    & this link: Sedatives | CO2: Natural Sedative and Tranquilize


    talks about calming yourself down by raising CO2 levels. 


    & if you page down to the bottom you can find some refs; keywords: panic, anxiety 


    fake it till you make it

  • MikeOceanMikeOcean
    edited April 2016

    In looking at Buteyko (and NormalBreathing) a lot, it seems like the Control Pause technique (i.e. body oxygen test) could be another good way to assess stress levels. It seems like when people are highly stress this drops quite a bit (due to hyperventilation). When you are relaxed, the number is higher. Mine seems to be highest after a session of meditation to it seems like there could be something to this.


     


    Has anyone used this as a measure of how stressed their system is?


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