Sodium Bicarbonate

I've been doing a lot of research into the balance of CO2 in the body (spurred initially by looking into Buteyko breathing). One of the tips is to drink water with baking soda (e.g., a teaspoon) dissolved in it. I'm curious as to whether there are any thoughts on the impact of this relatively easy and cheap tip? Positive? Negative? Neutral-ish?


 


And could you over-do it? How would you know?


 


Thanks!


Comments

  • RekaReka ✭✭✭

    I used to take it pre-workout, and after a while it gave me worse and worse nausea until I had to stop. It's alkaline so it's not friendly for your stomach acid. However, this effect only appeared after a long time.


    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

  • Thanks Reka. Why did you start taking it in the first place? Trying to see what benefit there would be although a lot of people claim that alkalizing your system makes you healthier so maybe it's that right there. 


  • RekaReka ✭✭✭


    Thanks Reka. Why did you start taking it in the first place? Trying to see what benefit there would be although a lot of people claim that alkalizing your system makes you healthier so maybe it's that right there. 




     


    I started it for two reasons: together with creatine to keep it alkaline; and because I'd read that it offsets the fatigue by somehow (not clear, how) buffering the lactic acid production in the muscles so they get acidic later and I can work longer. I experienced good effects from it but haven't tried since I stopped, the toll on my tummy was too much.

    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited April 2016

    I started it for two reasons: together with creatine to keep it alkaline; and because I'd read that it offsets the fatigue by somehow (not clear, how) buffering the lactic acid production in the muscles so they get acidic later and I can work longer. I experienced good effects from it but haven't tried since I stopped, the toll on my tummy was too much.




    Suppversity have done a few posts on creatine + bicarb,

    eg.

    > 2012/04/supercharging-creatine-with-baking-soda

    > 2014/09/creatine-sodium-bicarbonate-two-new

    > 2015/12/creatine-and-bicarbonate-worthwhile


    fake it till you make it

  • I have done some research into Sodium bicarb recently and believe it could be beneficial for kidney function.  


     


    The key downside is that it will neutralize your stomach acid so I do not believe it should be taken anywhere near eating.  I anticipate this would lead to a total lack of protein digestion and possibly the development of food allergies as undigested protein passes through your gut.  That being said, the people who are into fasting recommend it highly taking bicarb significantly removed from food wouldn't cause a digestion issue as far as I can tell.  


     


    Reka - the increase in basic (alkaline) ions in your blood stream caused by eating sodium bicarb could reasonably help neutralize the build up of lactic acid.  An easy test for this kind of thing is Wim Hoff breathing which I believe causes a significant drop in CO2 in the blood (an acid).  If you try something like doing the maximum number of push-ups you can do using regular breathing, then the next day doing the same test after several minutes of Wim Hof breathing, I think you'll see the increased endurance effect you're looking for.  In my experience this is a short lived effect but it seems to be a related mechanism to what you mentioned. How much were you taking? and was there any protein in your pre-workout?

  • Back in the late '90s my college/grad roommates were part of a team that conducted a research study into the effectiveness of sodium bicarb's buffering capacity on lactic acid production during a treadmill test.  I don't have the study off hand or if it was even published by the grad students.  (Penn State GCRC ~1997?) But the general conclusion I believe they came to was that it does buffer to a certain a point, but in order to achieve measurable results at higher and higher anaerobic outputs you would need to take so much that you'd end up with "disaster pants".  Keep in mind this was late 1990s and I'm sure other studies have been done since.  I don't know if they controlled for meal timing like James mentions. 


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