Bp Foods On Minimum Wage

Just curious: is there anyone else here who earns less than a living wage and is trying to eat BP foods? Budget is a major concern for me, and I live in a tiny blue collar town with only a handful of grocery stores, none of which carry much in the way of BP-approved foods, and the few things that ARE there can cost a pretty penny.


So if there's anyone else in a similar predicament, how are you handling it? Do you have any shopping tips?


My grocery budget for myself can't really exceed $40/week at the max.

Comments

  • edited April 2016

    Ouch, I feel your pain man. I have $100/week between my wife and I, we are both on Ketogenic diets. Intermittent fasting can save a bit of cash if you play it smart.


     


    I try to do bulletproof coffee in the morning up until I get lunch cravings. Then I usually have veggies with an avocado drizzled with brain-octane oil, and if I am really generous, maybe a few slices of grassfed beef (Though I don't get very lucky), then I get nutrient dense dinner that has lots of veggies and fat.


    I will be trying Dave's collagen bars for lunch with some veggies in the future.


     


    I would look at your budget to be honest... There has to be some places you can 'nip' and 'tuck' to get yourself some extra food gains.


  • Get a vegetable garden going and primarily eat from that.  You could even do an aquaponic system and eat fish too, although this will take a lot more of your time.


  • I would look at your budget to be honest... There has to be some places you can 'nip' and 'tuck' to get yourself some extra food gains.




    Trust me, I've looked and looked, but having a ton of debt doesn't help.

    Get a vegetable garden going and primarily eat from that.  You could even do an aquaponic system and eat fish too, although this will take a lot more of your time.




    Should've mentioned: I don't have the space to grow my own food. My fiancé and I have to live with my fiancé's parents, and the house is extremely cluttered. And since it's not my clutter and I'm not the head of the household, so I don't get to make choices about how the space is used.
  • I get my grass-fed beef in bulk, by the cow, and I freeze it. $4-5 a lb.


    Also, ask around/go on craigslist and see if you can't rent out a plot of land for gardening for cheap. My area's starting to do that sort of thing.


  • SkeletorSkeletor The Conqueror Worm ✭✭✭
    edited April 2016

    I wouldn't recommend a strict BP approach. Try and eat a looser paleo diet. There's more wiggle room. You'll still reap most of the benefits by eating paleo.


     


    More importantly, while we can discuss different ways to find cheaper quality food till the (grass-fed) cows come home, what you really need to be doing is upgrading your job. Do whatever you can to bring in more money and then affording these things will be easier. Probably not the answer you want to hear, but it's the only one that's going to make a difference in the long-run. Until I came to understand this I struggled hardcore to make ends meet and stay BP, with a wife and 3 kids.


     


    Anyhow, I've made it through leaner times by cutting some corners.


     


    1) Conventional butter. Not for your coffee, but for everything else. It's less nutritious, but it's not really the devil, either.


    2) Conventional eggs. Most of the nasty stuff ends up in the chicken, rather than the egg. Sure, conventional eggs aren't as nutritious as pastured, but they're just fine in a pinch.


    3) Shop local grocery stores that sell organic/grass-fed meats and buy them when they get marked down. Whenever I hit up my local Wal-Mart or Kroger or whatever, I seek out the mark-downs that are at their sell-by date and decide whether or not they'd make a worthwhile addition to my diet. Organic, vegetarian-fed meats (chicken, beef, tuirkey, etc) are going to be better than plain old conventional meats, especially if they're lean. Go for those, as they tend to be cheaper than full-on pastured. If you can, pick up pastured ground beef when it's on markdown as well. It's a good way to eat quality meat while stretching your dollars. If things get really, really desperate, then eat conventional meat, but choose the leanest cuts possible because the undesirable bits tend to accumulate in the fat.


    4) Buy some whey protein. Good whey can be had cheaply, and it's a fine way to add extra protein to your diet.


    5) Conventional produce. Look up the Clean 15/Dirty Dozen list to see what corners you can cut in the way of conventional vs organic produce. For some things, like avocados, it simply isn't worth shelling out the extra for the organic.


    6) Buy tinned or frozen fish. Sardines are your friend. The occasional can of tuna won't hurt. Canned wild salmon is awesome, and quite cheap-- especially pink salmon. Mackerel, if you're into that. Farmed, frozen tilapia fillets are extremely cheap, and are easy protein. While most farmed fish is probably not a good idea, I have read that tilapia is OK farmed. And it's usually inexpensive in bulk.


    7) If you don't have any sensitivity to legumes, consider adding beans to your diet in the short-term. It'll make your meals go further and provide some additional nutrients.


    8) Rice is cheap. Make it your go-to for carbs.


    9)When it comes to coffee, don't throw down for Dave's beans or some super-expensive primo coffee. If you're living on a shoestring budget, great coffee simply isn't going to be an option. That's fine. Unless you've got Asprey-level sensitivities to mycotoxins, you can drink Starbucks or Dunkin' Donuts coffee with your butter and MCT. Though if we're being honest, I wouldn't recommend doing BP coffee at all if you're on a tiny food budget. Heavy cream and a bit of coconut oil is cheaper, tastier and easier, and you'll still get a lot of the benefits (unless you've got issues with dairy).


    10) Incorporate fasting. Learn to love it. It saves you a ton of money and, if you do it right, it'll help you lose/maintain weight.


    11) Buy frozen produce and watch for sales. Frozen veggies are often cheaper than fresh for me, and they're fresher than the stuff in the produce section because they're frozen at their peak. Sacks of frozen broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, brussel sprouts, etc are versatile and nutritious.


    12) Don't turn down free meals. Your buddy or mom wants to take you out to dinner at such-and-such a place? Don't turn your nose up just because they don't cook in Kerrygold. Eat the healthiest things you can find, but don't just turn down free food if you really need it. I remember, a few times, being too militant and refusing certain foods because they weren't "BP-enough", and then regretting it later.


    13) If you can afford it, check out local buffets. Go to lunch, or breakfast when it's cheaper, and fill up on the healthiest things you can find. You can eat a whole day's worth of calories in a single visit and then fast the rest of the day. The Golden Corral near my place has a cheap breakfast, and though the meats aren't pastured, they have some options that are grilled. I eat a ton of that, heaps of steamed veggies and loads of fresh fruit/salad from the bar.


     


    I'm sure there's more, but I'm drawing a blank. I hope that helps somewhat. But being poor freaking sucks, and I've learned that the best way to enjoy a good diet is to work really hard at not being poor anymore.


    "I know how to despise mere cool intelligence. What I want is intelligence matched by pure, physical existence, like a statue." --Yukio Mishima

     

    Let's be friends on MyFitnessPal!

  • edited April 2016

    Thanks, Skeletor.  This is precisely the kind of outline I'm looking for.  (And might I say, the BP diet must have helped you lose weight--you're looking all skin and bones!  :D )


     


    I'm trying to improve my financial situation by starting my own online business, because this town has literally nothing better than entry-level jobs paying minimum wage or little better.  I don't have a driver's license or a car, and my fiance's mother needs us here anyway because she's terminally ill and bedridden, so the only way I'll be able to move out is if I earn enough money to help my fiance's parents pay for a live-in nurse on top of having enough to provide for myself and my future husband.


     


    A lot of what you've suggested I'm doing already, but I'll be looking to implement more of what you've suggested as well.  Thanks.


     


    It just sucks when you live in a place where basically nobody WANTS to eat so healthily (this town is largely Irish/Italian families, so half the freaking restaurants here serve processed pasta and pizza), so the grocery stores barely stock anything to help people who do.


  • I wonder about cheaper whey. Dont they have many mycotoxins? I see dave recommends whey isolate above concentrate unless grassfed, in which case concentrate would be better. I will start working out and need 130g protein a day and getting a lot from grass fed whey gets expensive but I am sensitive to mycotoxins. Long time ago had cheap whey and wasnt a success (felt shitty after taking it) but dont know why. Considering cheap whey without additives now but dont want to have to throw it away again.
  • I would just try some whey isolate from a reputable source. If you're super worried about dairy go for some debitterized hydrolyzed whey. I don't mess with anything that has extra ingredients, even if those ingredients are "bulletproof". You're probably exposed to a kajillion more mycotoxins in your daily life than you will encounter in a bag of whey protein unless you get it wet and leave it in a hot car or something.


  • I would just try some whey isolate from a reputable source. If you're super worried about dairy go for some debitterized hydrolyzed whey. I don't mess with anything that has extra ingredients, even if those ingredients are "bulletproof". You're probably exposed to a kajillion more mycotoxins in your daily life than you will encounter in a bag of whey protein unless you get it wet and leave it in a hot car or something.




    Well dairy from grain fed cows has mycotoxins and I react very bad to it. If you are not sensitive to it you might not notice it, but I am. Why would hydrolyzed have less toxins?

  • The toxins are stored in the fat, there is pretty much no fat in whey isolate, and minimal lactose/casein. Hydrolyzed whey has even less lactose/casein. Get a grass fed isolate, znaturals and truenutrition.com both have it pretty cheap. Anything more expensive than that is probably just overhyped marketing.
  • The bad thing is that if I order to Europe customs are often very expensive. Will get a regular isolate or hydrolisate, sounds safe and last time I tried isolate (when health was a lot worse) it was also fine.
  • Is there anything wrong with carrying on a weekly routine of this:


    Breakfast: BPC while fasting


    Lunch: Bulletproof Collagen Bars + Veggies


    Dinner: Good protein with lots of fat and veggie-carbs


     


    Obviously breaking fast with a carb-refeed day when my body feels like it needs it?


    Like OP, I cannot afford (financially) to support a full-on diet without depriving my family of funds to get through the month.


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