Fake Supplements On Amazon ?

CorstiaanCorstiaan
edited June 2016 in General Discussion

Evening lads,


 


I'm really curious about your opinion/experience when it comes to purchasing supplements from Amazon.


 


 


A couple of months ago I purchased Solaray C, Life Extension L-Threonate, LE K and Jarrow krill  for a relatively low price from the following UK dealers:


 


The batch numbers as well as expiration dates are printen on with easily eresabel ink, and for one of my supplements this was already the case upon arrival.


 


https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aag/main?ie=UTF8&asin=&isAmazonFulfilled=1&isCBA=&marketplaceID=A1F83G8C2ARO7P&orderID=203-5356635-4906720&protocol=current&seller=AUJI7YZ3HFDAS&sshmPath=


 


https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aag/main?ie=UTF8&asin=&isAmazonFulfilled=1&isCBA=&marketplaceID=A1F83G8C2ARO7P&orderID=203-5367703-3744302&protocol=current&seller=AKRBDGJN4LXWJ&sshmPath=


 


Their rating is extremely high, but quality control seems virtually impossible for customers.

For most people short term benefits of supplements are either placebo or unnoticeable.

Moreover, the retailer doesn't necessary need to be scamming people, he could also be negligent and get away with anything by selling through a business entity.

Lastly, a retailer may also be fooled himself as they seem to have a ridiculously large assortiment with products sold under market value.


 


 


http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/forums/ref=cs_hc_g_tv?ie=UTF8&forumID=Fx1SKFFP8U1B6N5&cdThread=Tx3EW3OFOXQIUUQ


Link to someone claiming even drugs with sawdust are being sold ( lol )


Comments

  • SkeletorSkeletor The Conqueror Worm ✭✭✭
    edited June 2016
    This isn't the first I've heard of such scams. Though I've bought supplements on Amazon before, I tend to stick only to sellers with great reputations or the manufacturers themselves. There are definitely scams out there, but I've been lucky enough not to fall prey to them so far. I'd just recommend buying supplements elsewhere. Sites like iHerb and Vitacost are more reputable and often (but not always) more affordable. Better than wondering if what you're buying is legit, IMO.

    "I know how to despise mere cool intelligence. What I want is intelligence matched by pure, physical existence, like a statue." --Yukio Mishima

     

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  • CorstiaanCorstiaan
    edited June 2016


    This isn't the first I've heard of such scams. Though I've bought supplements on Amazon before, I tend to stick only to sellers with great reputations or the manufacturers themselves. There are definitely scams out there, but I've been lucky enough not to fall prey to them so far. I'd just recommend buying supplements elsewhere. Sites like iHerb and Vitacost are more reputable and often (but not always) more affordable. Better than wondering if what you're buying is legit, IMO.




    I'd imagine even the negative placebo effect of thinking that a drug ''might '' be fake is not worth the money already. 


    I do order from Europe tho, kind of hard to get my hands on some of the products I want. 


     


    I've just opened a capsule, all I can say is that there is powder combined with minerals that have the structure and taste of salt. 


    Would be interesting to know if I could have things like this tested somewhere. I mean, people are also able to legally test harddrugs for free and get away with it...


    http://postimg.org/image/9abmlg9gr/


  • You can use the site camelcamelcamel.com to check on how prices have fluctuated over time (and put in an alert for when the price dips again). You can also use fakespot.com to check for fake reviews.
  • @MeatTrain said:
    You can use the site camelcamelcamel.com to check on how prices have fluctuated over time (and put in an alert for when the price dips again). You can also use fakespot.com to check for fake reviews.

    Cool! Thanks.

  • joeygym65joeygym65
    edited February 7

    Manufacturers also create unique formulas for Amazon. Amazon has certain regulations for supplements sold on their site. I know for c4 pre workout, the formula is weaker sold on Amazon compared to other retailers such as bodybuilding or sameday

  • Jason HooperJason Hooper ✭✭✭
    edited February 7

    I know one of the product managers at Cellucor (the makers of C4, FitJoy and L2) and I messaged him on Skype quoting the post above. He replied:

    no. why in the world would we do that? unless they are talking about the RTD, but we sell the same product on amazon as anywhere else with the same ingredients and same packaging. actually amazon has a higher turnaround than the other online retailers meaning that they are getting fresher batches.

    So, there you go.

  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited February 7

    @joeygym65 said:
    Manufacturers also create unique formulas for Amazon. Amazon has certain regulations for supplements sold on their site. I know for c4 pre workout, the formula is weaker sold on Amazon compared to other retailers such as bodybuilding or sameday

    Are you sure you are not mixing up Amazon with Canada, it happens all the time. Lol.
    ...But to my point,
    I have seen one supplement (a probiotic) with identical naming & labelling which had different probiotic strains for the Canadian market.
    So perhaps amazon.Ca has some unique formulas...unique to Canada.

    fake it till you make it

  • Would argue that what y'all saying probably only applies fillers and the possibilty of contamination. I doubt it would be legal to just change some of the main ingredients when the marketing channels used are global. The former however, may be adjusted to make it cheaper whilst still meeting local regulatory requirements.

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