Oxidized Vitamin C Is Under-Rated

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10877828


 



 


While 200-800 microM vitamin C caused apoptosis of Jurkat and H9 human T lymphocytes, pretreatment with 200-1000 microM dehydroascorbate stimulated activity of pentose phosphate pathway enzymes glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and transaldolase, elevated intracellular glutathione levels, and inhibited H(2)O(2)-induced changes in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and cell death. A 3. 3-fold maximal glutathione elevation was observed after 48 h stimulation with 800 microM dehydroascorbate.




And: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25792869

 



 


Dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) as the oxidized form of ascorbic acid (AA) acts as a cellular protector against oxidative stress and easily enters into the brain compared to AA




 


Based on our findings, we propose that DHA might alleviate the pathogenesis of ischemic brain injury by attenuating edema, neuronal loss, and by improving synaptic connection.





Sounds pretty great to me. The pentose phosphate pathway seems more and more important as I learn more biochemistry. It produces d-ribose, literally elemental to life, and NADPH, which is involved glutathione reduction and a bunch of other stuff. Why haven't I heard about this pathway before?


So maybe fruit cooked down to jam ain't so bad...


Comments

  • How in the world can oxidized stuff be an antioxidant? :-D sounds really good. I never heard of this. Any of the natural health guys write about it?


    Also, its called DHA - which is a confusing name because its already taken by our favorite Omega 3 :-D




  • How in the world can oxidized stuff be an antioxidant? :grin: sounds really good. I never heard of this. Any of the natural health guys write about it?


    Also, its called DHA - which is a confusing name because its already taken by our favorite Omega 3 :grin:




    I don't think it's an actual antioxidant by itself. But that's not what's important. What's important is the physiological effects of SPECIFIC antioxidants i.e. glutathione. When they say it acts as an antioxidant, they probably mean that the overall effect doesn't generate as many useless free-radicals, and instead more useful stuff, even though it may have a technically overall oxidative effect.


    On the flip-side, there are plenty of important OXIDANTS like nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide that act as chemical messengers to tell other parts of the body about physiological processes that are going on. Without these, our bodies would go haywire. So it's more about where and how the reduction/oxidation is happening. For example, there's also reductive stress, where there's too much localized antioxidant power. This inhibits important redox reactions required for life, usually by inhibiting electron transport.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reductive_stress


    It's really complicated, and I can't claim to know everything about it. But it's much more than just antioxidant vs oxidant consumption.


    I haven't heard any health guys talk about it. That's why I posted.

  • gnoobergnoober
    edited June 2016

    Thats interesting. Are you thinking of sourcing the stuff and taking it?


    In "Tera"'s comment on this page: http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/beware-of-ascorbic-acid-synthetic/


    you can read that the ascorbic acid you normally take shifts states to and from DHA all the time, if you do not have anything to buffer the reactions.


    So from her perspective, standard ascorbic acid contains all 3 forms of vitamin c. o.O


     


    troubling is this excerpt:



     


     


    The degradation of vitamin C in mammals is initiated by the hydrolysis of dehydroascorbate to 2,3-diketo-l-gulonate, which is spontaneously degraded to oxalate, CO(2) and l-erythrulose. [9]

    -> http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2010/11/dangers-of-zero-carb-diets-iv-kidney-stones/


     


    we dont want any more oxalates than necessary :-D


Sign In or Register to comment.