Anyone Else Blaming Their Reduced Deep Sleep For Their Erectile Dysfunction?

edited September 2016 in Sleep Hacking

Ever since the onset of my insomnia 3 years ago I have been suffering from gradually worsening erectile dysfunction which has now finally completely gone dead. I always linked the two as I'm a thin active guy with no other physical issues. I get severely fragmented sleep with multiple awakenings, and my zeo shows the sleep averages at around 55 minutes per night of 7 hour sleep. I always assumed that may be this 55 minutes was too low and therefore causing my erectile dysfunction. However many others on the internet also have posted that they only get around an hour of deep sleep, such as this one:

 


https://www.gwern.net/Zeo


 


I also found some lucky bastards (also using Zeo) that have posted that they get 2.5 hours of deep sleep http://forum.bulletproofexec.com/index.php?/topic/15400-best-most-accurate-sleep-tracking-technology/ and 2.3 hours of deep sleep http://forum.bulletproofexec.com/index.php?/topic/3977-supplementsnootropics-for-focus-and-sleep-reduction/


 


It is unknown to me whether the 1 hour deep sleep group faces erection problems like me. For those interested here  the pubmed article 15504427 saying that erectile dysfunction from otherwise unidentified physical causes (called psychogenic) is linked to reduced delta wave sleep. This article has been the holy grail for me all these 3 years, and I have been unsuccessfully trying to increase my deep sleep hoping to fix my erection problems, but now I get confused after seeing the postings by the 1 hour group, whether it is normal after all to have only that much deep sleep.


Can people here please post their observations of any observed link between their deep sleep amount and erections? This is killing me and my family, and any help or kind words is much appreciated.


Comments

  • John BrissonJohn Brisson The Legend Formerly Known as Ron Swanson ✭✭✭
    edited September 2016

    I was born to answer this thread.


     


    Without enough RIM sleep you do not have nocturnal penile tumescence. Without that your penis becomes flaccid over time because it is not being exercised. You need to work on proper circadian rhythm. In addition sunlight exposure will increase nitric oxide and in doing so will increase erection strength and occurrence.


     


    http://fixyourgut.com/why-proper-sleep-hygeine-is-important-for-digestive-health/


     


    You need proper sunlight exposure, reduced blue light at night, correct possible magnesium deficiency, maintain proper hydration, fix testosterone levels, and increase Omega 3 fatty acid intake.


    My book Fix Your Gut, is offered on Amazon for $9.99.

     

    I also offer coaching:  http://fixyourgut.com/health-coaching-information/

     

    Please join or like the Fix your Gut Facebook. Also please add me on twitter @FixYourGutJB.

     

    http://www.fixyourgut.com

     

  • Modern Life SurvivalistModern Life Survivalist Saturated Fat Truther ✭✭
    edited September 2016

    Agree with John B. You need to lay off the TV, laptop, and video games at night. Also turn off your router and your cell phone at night (if not all the time). Blue light and EMF are completely sabotaging your melatonin production. You will notice vast differences immediately.


  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭
    edited September 2016


    Also turn off your router and your cell phone at night (if not all the time). Blue light and EMF are completely sabotaging your melatonin production.




    I understand the impact of blue spectrum light on melatonin production, due to the whole we-evolved-daytime-photo-receptors thing, but how do other EMF spectrums impact melatonin production?


    (Sorry for being overly pedantic in this post, but the distinction between light and other EMFs seemed a bit odd to me. That might be due to working with spectrophotometers recently. Electromagnetic spectroscopy is fascinating, one of our closest modern-day equivalents to Star Trek sensor technology!) 


     


     


    Quick tip on EMF avoidance. Unless you live in a heavily rural area turning off your home router and cell phone will be about as effective at reducing EMF exposure as not actively feeding pigeons is at reducing the pigeon population. Your neighbors have WiFi that can reach several hundred feet, and cell towers do their broadcasting over 22-45 square miles (your phone is merely a transceiver). You'd need to construct a Faraday cage around your sleeping area to appreciably reduce exposure to EMF emissions beyond the visible spectrum. I think there are a few brands of EMF-blocking sleepware available that has some sort of metallic micromesh woven into the fabric, but unless you use this fabric the way you would use mosquito netting then you'll still have exposed fleshy bits if you expect to sleep comfortably, and that kinda defeats the purpose. So, lining your sleeping area with something that blocks the unwanted EMF spectrums (in the same way you completely cover your window with blackout curtains and electronic status lights with gaffer tape to keep out ambient blue light) is the way to go.


  • Modern Life SurvivalistModern Life Survivalist Saturated Fat Truther ✭✭


    Unless you live in a heavily rural area turning off your home router and cell phone will be about as effective at reducing EMF exposure as not actively feeding pigeons is at reducing the pigeon population. Your neighbors have WiFi that can reach several hundred feet, and cell towers do their broadcasting over 22-45 square miles (your phone is merely a transceiver). You'd need to construct a Faraday cage around your sleeping area to appreciably reduce exposure to EMF emissions beyond the visible spectrum. 




     


    Not true. Walls do more than you would expect. If he's an apartment and everyone in the building has a router, I would tend to agree that turning off your own router would make a difference, but with houses with a front and back yard, it would make a huge difference. Every inch counts with EMFs, and if you have a cell phone next to your abdomen, or a WiFi in the same room, it's like living next to a mini-cell tower.

  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭
    edited September 2016


    Every inch counts with EMFs




    Except of course those electromagnetic frequencies which have wavelengths larger than a few inches. It seems like you are only concerned with certain frequencies in the microwave range though, and that's perfectly fine. Even then, you have to have adequate shielding. Microwaves do not simply stop dead in mid air, even beyond the normal operating range of their transmitter. They go through normal walls just fine. That's why your cell phone has signal strength in your home. Architects and engineers take special care to design R&D rooms in buildings that do not allow stray EMFs in, but these are extremely costly and require specific materials. A DIY solution is the Faraday cage.


     


    Additionally, you should try grabbing your tablet/laptop and searching for available WiFi in your area, with your home WiFi shut off. Even living in a rural area I could pick up my neighbor's WiFi from down the street, 5+ acres away. With a body of water, trees, metal buildings, and power lines providing environmental barriers. Modern routers are pretty potent. In a city the average yard leaves 20-50 feet between houses, well within the Good rating for WiFi signal strength. In the suburbs or the older zoning areas of a city that might increase to 100+ feet, but the neighbor's signal is still easily permeating your walls (unless you have metal siding!).


     




    if you have a cell phone next to your abdomen, or a WiFi in the same room, it's like living next to a mini-cell tower.




    You have a huge misconception here. A cell phone does not act like a mini cell tower, it is basically a transceiver operating off a remote signal. The tower is what broadcasts, and it covers dozens of miles. It will go through walls just fine. Cell phones definitely emit various wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum when connecting to a wireless signal, but that's limited to a few dozen feet, not miles. Turning off the cell phone does not keep the frequencies from the tower from coming right into your bedroom. 


     


    You could argue that a WiFi router has similar operating principles to a cell phone tower, sure, but with the router there is an incredible power output differences. Several orders of magnitude difference, in multiple different bands. Even then, the router signal extends much further than is actually usable, so if we are talking about biological effects rather than data connectivity you are definitely being impacted by neighboring WiFi routers.


     


     


     


    Now there are actually add-on devices designed to plug in to your router and use its internet connection to function as a cell tower repeater. These devices are designed to let consumers broadcast on all the various cellular data bands that their normal router could not hope to put out.


     


    If cell phones and WiFi routers worked as mini cell towers then we could have an ad hoc dynamic communication system anywhere sans infrastructure, but sadly we cannot as of yet. That kind of technology would be phenominal for developing countries, remote areas, battlefield communication, but it is being employed via drones, not handheld communications devices or home networks. We have alternatives to that with services like Google's ProjectFi, but those are actually repurposing known WiFi hotspots to route cellular communications digitally through Google's data centers, essentially creating a virtual cell tower to handle the load.


     


    After 7 years in the consumer communications industry trust me, if we could use cell phones and routers as mini towers then we would have been using it to increase customer's service areas instead of waiting for new LTE infrastructure to be built over the course of a few years. That's why services like ProjectFi are so invigorating to the stagnation of the cellular service market. With the devices we have in our homes the power output is just not there. 


     


     


    EDIT: Made a few changes to explain things better, several points were jumbled together. I tried to write this post similarly to how I would have explained wireless signal issues to a customer back in the day, and router technology has definitely improved in the last few years. I'm cheap so I stuck with my older router for years before simply relying on my phone's hotspot, which is nearly as strong signal-wise as the old router! I'd love to get my hands on an up-to-date smart home router and see how much technology has improved, but like I said, cheap.


  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭
    edited September 2016

    Apologies to the OP for derailing the thread, just had to clear up that misconception about how cell phones and WiFi routers function. They definitely emit microwave frequencies, they just do not function as mini cell towers and turning them off does nothing to stop the cell tower signal from coming through your walls.


     


    I'd still like to hear about which electromagnetic frequencies aside from visible light impact melatonin production, that would be pretty helpful for the OP's question too. 


     


    Cheers!


  • Modern Life SurvivalistModern Life Survivalist Saturated Fat Truther ✭✭
    edited September 2016


    Additionally, you should try grabbing your tablet/laptop and searching for available WiFi in your area, with your home WiFi shut off. Even living in a rural area I could pick up my neighbor's WiFi from down the street, 5+ acres away. With a body of water, trees, metal buildings, and power lines providing environmental barriers. Modern routers are pretty potent. In a city the average yard leaves 20-50 feet between houses, well within the Good rating for WiFi signal strength. In the suburbs or the older zoning areas of a city that might increase to 100+ feet, but the neighbor's signal is still easily permeating your walls (unless you have metal siding!).


     


    You have a huge misconception here. A cell phone does not act like a mini cell tower, it is basically a transceiver operating off a remote signal. The tower is what broadcasts, and it covers dozens of miles. It will go through walls just fine. Cell phones definitely emit various wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum when connecting to a wireless signal, but that's limited to a few dozen feet, not miles. Turning off the cell phone does not keep the frequencies from the tower from coming right into your bedroom. 


     


    You could argue that a WiFi router has similar operating principles to a cell phone tower, sure, but with the router there is an incredible power output differences. Several orders of magnitude difference, in multiple different bands. Even then, the router signal extends much further than is actually usable, so if we are talking about biological effects rather than data connectivity you are definitely being impacted by neighboring WiFi routers.


    technology has definitely improved in the last few years. I'm cheap so I stuck with my older router for years before simply relying on my phone's hotspot, which is nearly as strong signal-wise as the old router! I'd love to get my hands on an up-to-date smart home router and see how much technology has improved, but like I said, cheap.



     



    You can talk theory all you want, but I have measured with a decent meter, and cell phones are pinging once in awhile at 70 to even 200 mW/m^2 when on. Cell phone towers that steadily hit me at .15 mW/m^2 right outside the walls of my house are a fraction of that (only between .001 to .01) when inside the house, even right next to the wall. Clearly the walls are doing a lot to block them. I have brick walls, though. Not sure about different materials.


     



     


    If cell phones and WiFi routers worked as mini cell towers then we could have an ad hoc dynamic communication system anywhere sans infrastructure, but sadly we cannot as of yet. That kind of technology would be phenominal for developing countries, remote areas, battlefield communication, but it is being employed via drones, not handheld communications devices or home networks. We have alternatives to that with services like Google's ProjectFi, but those are actually repurposing known WiFi hotspots to route cellular communications digitally through Google's data centers, essentially creating a virtual cell tower to handle the load.



    I wasn't saying they were literally acting as cell towers. Stop taking everything I say so literally, please.


  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭


    You can talk theory all you want, but I have measured with a decent meter, and cell phones are pinging once in awhile at 70 to even 200 mW/m^2 when on. Cell phone towers that steadily hit me at .15 mW/m^2 right outside the walls of my house are a fraction of that (only between .001 to .01) when inside the house, even right next to the wall. Clearly the walls are doing a lot to block them. I have brick walls, though. Not sure about different materials.




    At what strength does this type of microwave radiation impact melatonin production? Is there a dose efficacy curve? Point is, a Faraday cage (or equivalent siding material like aluminum siding) would block 100% of the signal. Certain frame material in buildings also blocks signals (Faraday cage!). You'd also need to take into account the distance between your home and the nearest cell tower, and which microwave bands you are monitoring with your meter (which is why measuring with an app on your phone is pretty neat with all the antennas available!). Of course this is just for cellular signal, WiFi is an entirely different animal and a neighbor's WiFi will be fairly intense.


     


    It's worth mentioning that your monitoring of the cell phone is indicating a signal spike when transmitting data. Most likely from push notification for different apps. Not just from being on. So you can simply disable cellular data connection and still get any emergency calls or text messages without random signal spikes from apps updating push data, since data and calls work off of different bands. Additionally, this signal spike is coming from both the cell phone and the tower, it's two-way. Phone pings the tower, tower increases signal for that particular device radio id (IMEI). Your meter is monitoring the emission, but is not indicating the source since your meter does not have the capability to do the triangulation required. Not particularly glamorous details, but they have practical significance since any time a phone within a roughly 30yd radius transmits data you'll have a local signal spike. Again, within the distance of neighbors in an urban area.


     


     




    I wasn't saying they were literally acting as cell towers. Stop taking everything I say so literally, please.




    You're taking my discussion of theoretical cellular network technology literally for some reason. That's why I put it in a separate paragraph from the practically applicable knowledge, separated by two blank lines.


     


     


     


    All these technical points are still getting away from the important questions:


    1. How do EMFs affect melatonin production?


     


    2. Which electromagnetic frequencies are impacting melatonin production?


     


    3. How should we monitor this impact to see if efforts to cut down on EMF exposure are improving melatonin production?


    It's a fascinating idea but it needs a bit of fleshing out so it can be prioritized alongside John Brisson's suggestions and given a weighted average vs the inconvenience and possibility of missing important communications.


  • i thought your heart as it beats help create a barrier against wireless signals at least.   


  • Modern Life SurvivalistModern Life Survivalist Saturated Fat Truther ✭✭
    edited September 2016


    You'd also need to take into account the distance between your home and the nearest cell tower, and which microwave bands you are monitoring with your meter (which is why measuring with an app on your phone is pretty neat with all the antennas available!). Of course this is just for cellular signal, WiFi is an entirely different animal and a neighbor's WiFi will be fairly intense.




     


    I've logged many hours on the Cornet ED78S. I've found that cell phone towers emit a steady intensity which lowers pretty uniformly as you get further and further away radius-wise. Cell phones and routers emit extremely erratic pulsed frequencies.


     


    Phone apps that measure frequencies are useless (at least the ones I've tried), because it itself is emitting. This mucks up the works for accurate measurement, at least it appeared to when compared with a more useful tool like the Cornet.


     



     


     


    1. How do EMFs affect melatonin production?


    2. Which electromagnetic frequencies are impacting melatonin production?


    3. How should we monitor this impact to see if efforts to cut down on EMF exposure are improving melatonin production?

     


    1. Your pineal gland, responsible for signaling melatonin production to take place, is EMF-sensitive, because in the absence of man-made frequencies, our brains are reactive to the Sun's rising and setting. When the Sun is present, there are tons of frequencies present on all ends of the spectrum, and our biology senses this and releases seratonin/melatonin according to their presence/absence.


     


    2. A lot of good information and tons of specifics in this article.


     


    An excerpt: "Fifteen studies from show that ELF and RF/MW exposure reduces melatonin in people and a serotonin enhancement. Evidence that EMR reduced melatonin in human beings commenced with Wang (1989) who found that workers who were more highly exposed to RF/MW had a dose-response increase in serotonin, and hence indicates a reduction in melatonin. Thirteen studies have observed significant EMR associated melatonin reduction in humans.


    They involve a wide range of exposure situations, including 50/60 Hz fields, Wilson et al. (1990), Graham et al. (1994), Davis (1997) [in a dose response manner], Wood et al. (1998), Karasek et al. (1998), and Burch et al. (1997, 1998, 1999a, 2000), Jutilainen et al. (2000) and Graham et al. (2000); 16.7 Hz fields, Pfluger et al. (1996), VDTs Arnetz et al. (1996), a combination of 60 Hz fields and cell phone use, Burch et al. (1997), and a combination of occupational 60Hz exposure and increased geomagnetic activity around 30nT, Burch et al. (1999b)."


     


    There's a lot more out there (this is just the first I found), I'm sure specifically about the effects from the microwave range (most within the 900 MHz to 5 GHz range), where I believe the most damage is done (unless these even higher frequencies are worse, which haven't been tested (i.e. those used with 5G in the 15 GHz and up range)).


     


    3. We'd have to be able to monitor melatonin production affordably in real time for our own purposes. However, there is the awesome biomarker called tiredness, coupled with an even more ultimate biomarker called sleep quality to determine whether it works. IOW, just shut off your router and cell phone, turn off the power breaker in your room (or don't, if you want to see if that's your main problem), and measure for other stray EMFs that may be getting into your bedroom from the towers in your neighborhood, or your neighbors' routers. If turning off your own electro-crap doesn't improve your sleep (which I'm highly doubtful it wouldn't), then you need to start knocking on doors, writing petitions to take down towers, or just considering moving).


     


    You could also ask other people who've tinkered with removing EMFs, and find out what intensities (and frequencies) of ambient EMF seem to disturb them. I personally start to get sleep issues when the intensity spends any significant amount of time between .01 mW/m^2 to .1 mW/m^2. In the daytime, I currently usually start to experience digestive disturbances at significant amounts of time spent under .5 to 1 mW/m^2 intensity.


  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭


    I've logged many hours on the Cornet ED78S. I've found that cell phone towers emit a steady intensity which lowers pretty uniformly as you get further and further away radius-wise. Cell phones and routers emit extremely erratic pulsed frequencies.




    Cell phones and other devices outputs are pulsed with use, since you don't want to drain your battery by constantly transmitting and receiving empty packets.


     


     




    Phone apps that measure frequencies are useless (at least the ones I've tried), because it itself is emitting. This mucks up the works for accurate measurement, at least it appeared to when compared with a more useful tool like the Cornet.




    If you want to use the phone as a detector then turn off data and cellular services /  pop out the SIM card. Unless of course you are monitoring relative tower strength and triangulating between the towers closest to you which I find particularly useful for determining which network I am on and which areas have the best LTE signal. The GPS antenna capability is particularly useful since you can actually plot the tower location on a map and relative signal overlap areas so you know when to expect a device handshake that will interrupt your data.


     


     


     




    1. Your pineal gland, responsible for signaling melatonin production to take place, is EMF-sensitive, because in the absence of man-made frequencies, our brains are reactive to the Sun's rising and setting. When the Sun is present, there are tons of frequencies present on all ends of the spectrum, and our biology senses this and releases seratonin/melatonin according to their presence/absence.




    The pineal gland works in concert with retinal nerves to react with visible light and regulate the central nervous system's day/night cycle to the rising/setting sun, but how is it reacting with other electromagnetic frequencies?


     


     




    2. A lot of good information and tons of specifics in this article.




    I am extremely skeptical of this link, especially due to the odd grammar mistakes and antiquated site design. It appears that some of the individual citations from various studies may have been cherry-picked, as many of them relate to melatonin's impact on cancer and Parkinson's research or show a low sample size of 15 or 30 individuals with only 20% exhibiting any symptoms from exposure. Most of the studies seem to be based on 50-60Hz magnetic field exposure, nowhere near microwaves. Not to mention conflating between ELF, EMR, magnetic fields, and microwaves, which are not interchangeable terms. 


     


     


     




    3. We'd have to be able to monitor melatonin production affordably in real time for our own purposes. However, there is the awesome biomarker called tiredness, coupled with an even more ultimate biomarker called sleep quality to determine whether it works. IOW, just shut off your router and cell phone, turn off the power breaker in your room (or don't, if you want to see if that's your main problem), and measure for other stray EMFs that may be getting into your bedroom from the towers in your neighborhood, or your neighbors' routers. If turning off your own electro-crap doesn't improve your sleep (which I'm highly doubtful it wouldn't), then you need to start knocking on doors, writing petitions to take down towers, or just considering moving).




    Going off tiredness and even using a sleep tracker would not be specific enough to indicate causality. You could be sleeping better because of the nightly ritual putting you into a more relaxed state, eliminating anxiety by turning off your electronics. You'd have to be sure that you did not make any dietary or supplement changes at the same time, thus John's suggestions could be throwing off any data gathered unless you are doing some sort of saliva melatonin metabolite test such as the one cited in the Swiss study. Even then, your melatonin cycle could be impacted by the supplements. 


     


    It would be far far easier to set up a DIY Faraday cage in your sleeping area than to get private companies to shut down communications infrastructure and neighbors to turn off their devices. You could even use some aluminum-backed adhesive paper like you would for soundproofing a car, and increase your temperature regulation at the same time saving you money on heating and cooling! For a few hundred dollars you could easily create a microwave-neutral zone in your house, and with some ingenuity it could blend in with your decor and be undetectable. 


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