Less Saturated fats in winter/cold climates?

Does anyone have opinions on eating less saturated fat in colder climate's or winter vs hot/summer climates?

Seems that most saturated fats occur in hot places(coconut and palm oil, Cacao/Chocolate), and more unsaturated's occur in colder places(fatty fish).

As i try to reduce carbs(especially fructose) during winter it's kinda inconvenient to reduce some fats too! More nuts, eggs, meat, fatty fish and olive oil perhaps..

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/seasonality-climate-and-diet/

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  • cortextcortext ✭✭
    edited January 2017

    I tend to find that carbs / mct oil (saturated fat) / protein rev up thermogenesis and cold tolerance, so to some extent it makes sense to me to increase these during the winter, possibly at a caloric surplus. During the summer, I load up on avocados and olive oil (mostly unsaturated fats.) Ymmv.

  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited January 2017

    dare I say it, Jack Kruse has an opinion;
    https://www.jackkruse.com/cold-thermogenesis-6-the-ancient-pathway/
    ...roughly;
    Coconut oil and palm oil are the ideal fats for spring and summer uses for humans. [this would include MCT oils].
    Coconut oil and palm oil are tropical oils and not found in our polar regions.
    Coconuts and palm nuts are not available in the winter.

    In winter, mammals prefer animal fats like ghee, tallow, lard, bacon grease, and pastured butter as the best choices.

    fake it till you make it

  • RekaReka ✭✭✭

    Mammals? :D The only mammals who eat butter and ghee are humans.

    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited January 2017

    @Reka said:
    Mammals? :D The only mammals who eat butter and ghee are humans.

    classic Kruse

    fake it till you make it

  • HegReg33HegReg33 ✭✭
    edited January 2017

    Saturated fats are more likely to solidify in freezing temperatures vs > monounsaturated > polyunsaturated.

    Omega-3s have a large role in upregulating BAT thermogenesis. Too many studies to cite here.

    Kruse says it also has a role in actually LIMITING thermogenesis. Can't find any studies on this, but it makes evolutionary sense, I think. Uncontrolled thermogenesis makes a warm bear in December, and a dead bear by January. But for us non-hibernating humans, I would guess it could only increase thermogenesis.

    I wonder if this is what Ray Peat discovered when he found that EFA-starved rats had higher metabolisms? Uncontrolled thermogenesis?

    I think as long as you're getting the full range of fats, your body would structurally incorporate what it needs (as signaled by your environment at the time), and burn the rest (?). I don't think saturated fats will be a huge problem in winter, especially due to the fact that even the coldest environment have a significant amount of saturated fat. It's just skewed toward the poly side. Just eat your omega-3s and call it good.

    Really want to play it safe? Eat the animals outside your door. You can almost guarantee they have the proper ratios for your environment. Belong to your food chain. Sorry, cityfolk :(

    Question for you chemist/physics people: does omega-3 have any superior insulation properties vs saturated fats? I would expect the most insulating fats to also turn up in the hottest (>98.6) climates, no?

  • RekaReka ✭✭✭

    @HegReg33 said:

    Really want to play it safe? Eat the animals outside your door.

    That is a lot of dogs to eat. :)

    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

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