Cost Of The Diet - Recommendations?

Well, my wife and I have been doing this thing for about 3 weeks now, and it seems like sticking to the diet is going to be pretty costly. Right now, sticking with grass-fed and organic foods has cost us $750 for the two of us over the past three weeks. Looks like this diet is going to cost us nearly a thousand dollars a month. Given that our pre-BP food budget was $300 a month, this more than triples it.

Some of the cost comes from the fact that we are now doing most of our shopping at local farmers' markets, Whole Foods and Sprouts, whereas before, most of our shopping was done at Costco and our local Ralph's. The problem is that Costco does not seem to have anything organic or grass fed, and Ralphs' selection in this area is very limited, and quite expensive (as an example, one package of Kerrygold butter at Ralph's is $4.99, while it's only $3.69 at our local Whole Foods -- not a store known for bargain pricing).

So, does anyone out there have any suggestions on how to keep costs lower?

Comments

  • SkeletorSkeletor The Conqueror Worm ✭✭✭

    Do you have a Wal-Mart near you? They sell staples like organic produce, grass-fed meat and Kerrygold. And likely for a lot less.

    I'd recommend eating cheaper cuts of beef, stuff like ground beef. It'll be much cheaper than a steak. Wild caught tinned seafood, too, is affordable. Get some sardines.

    If you can't afford the farmer's market, stick to grocery store produce. Frozen organic produce can sometimes be found for cheaper than fresh.

    Do you drink Bulletproof Coffee? If you're buying Dave's beans, consider trying some other, cheaper (though still high-quality coffees). They may suit you just fine.

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  • HocHoc
    edited January 2017

    @Skeletor said:
    Do you have a Wal-Mart near you? They sell staples like organic produce, grass-fed meat and Kerrygold. And likely for a lot less.

    I'd recommend eating cheaper cuts of beef, stuff like ground beef. It'll be much cheaper than a steak. Wild caught tinned seafood, too, is affordable. Get some sardines.

    If you can't afford the farmer's market, stick to grocery store produce. Frozen organic produce can sometimes be found for cheaper than fresh.

    Do you drink Bulletproof Coffee? If you're buying Dave's beans, consider trying some other, cheaper (though still high-quality coffees). They may suit you just fine.

    No Wal Marts near here, but there's one about 10 miles away, so maybe we can try that one. Thanks. Today, we bought for this week: 2 lbs ground beef, 1 1/2 lbs. chuck, 1 lb. bones, 1 lb. sirloin. Total cost was $132. Then 18 pastured eggs. Cost: $12. For coffee, we've already switched to a local roaster in Oceanside, who gives us 3 12-oz. bags for $30, so saving a bit from Dave's coffee. Also, Whole Foods had a sale on vitamins last weekend, so we were able to buy 3 bottles of Brain Octane for $15 ea.

    I really have a problem with fishy fish. It needs to be very mild white fish, grilled only and extremely fresh. Petrale Sole is the best BP fish I can tolerate, but no wild caught around here. I can handle whitefish from a local restaurant that I can get around $10 for a meal, but not BP. Santa Monica Seafood has good, fresh fish, but also quite expensive and about a 45-minute drive from us.

  • Start a garden. Buy beef by the whole, half, or quarter. Buy eggs locally.

    Start hunting and fishing. Foraging.

    I don't even know if these things are possible or realistic for where you live, or your current living arrangement? Then I would move. Or just pay the price. Or sacrifice quality for a lesser price.

    And unless you know a lot of people to whom you can brag about your bulletproofness, you don't need to be perfect.

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  • @Bull of Heaven said:
    Start a garden. Buy beef by the whole, half, or quarter. Buy eggs locally.

    Start hunting and fishing. Foraging.

    I don't even know if these things are possible or realistic for where you live, or your current living arrangement? Then I would move. Or just pay the price. Or sacrifice quality for a lesser price.

    And unless you know a lot of people to whom you can brag about your bulletproofness, you don't need to be perfect.

    Yeah, gardening and ranching are not really doable here. We do buy eggs locally. That's why they are $12 for 18 eggs. As for hunting and foraging, unless I was planning to eat rats and dogs, not a viable option. As far as "being perfect," I am hoping to lose weight, and based on the book, unless I am going with grass fed and organic, that becomes much more difficult.

  • HocHoc
    edited January 2017

    @Jason Miller said:

    Please do not think that these are requirements for losing weight, you can eat all conventional versions of all of your foods and still reach body composition goals, you can even attain these goals without a low carb high fat diet. But again, to directly address your statement, grass fed and organic have absolutely nothing to do with body composition.

    They do if you are trying to avoid food cravings. I've been on all kinds of diets, all my life. Low carb, low calorie, Weight Watchers, Atkins, Nutrisystems, Hyman, Meal Plans, etc. Most of them are accompanied by massive food cravings and a real problem sticking to the diet. But this is the first one where I am not experiencing food cravings of any kind. The theory being that the non-organic, GMO foods or grain fed meats tend to cause inflammation and lead to food cravings. You can reject that theory, but for me, it appears to work. The only problem is the cost.

  • @Jason Miller said:
    It's not about rejecting anything, of course you can do as you see fit, but the fact remains that organic and grass fed have no effect on body composition. Sticking to a diet is not validation of whether or not a food item has an effect as you are not maintaining calories, isocalorically speaking there is no benefit or effect, just wanted to make sure people know that. You will not experience a difference in inflammation switching from grass fed to grain fed, nor will you with organic to gmo, nor will you experience a difference in body composition, nor do these items cause cravings of any sort. If cost for these luxury items is prohibitive and body composition is the driver, then save your money, if you are having a phychosomatic response that dictates your adherence to caloric intake, then maybe it is worth it.

    All I know is that, pre-diet, I was maintaining my weight on 1400 calories a day, with 1-hr workouts roughly 6 days a week. In the 3 weeks since starting this diet, I've lost 22 lbs. My calorie intake has increased greatly (maybe double, maybe more with all the fat), and I'm not having the food cravings I've had on every single other diet I've ever been on.

    You can argue that the quality of the food does not relate to body composition. I understand that. But, if it does not relate to the lack of food cravings, what else is causing the lack of cravings along with the substantial weight loss?

    You say that it has no effect on inflammation, but Dave's book says exactly the opposite. If you don't want to accept his theories, that is certainly your option. Sticking with a diet such as Paleo or something recommended by Mark Hyman would comport with what you suggest. But it does not comport with the BP diet theories. So far, it's working for me, and I have no explanation other than the fact that, for the first time, I am sticking with grass fed, organic and non-GMO.

  • @Jason Miller said:
    It's not a big deal, you still aren't understanding what I'm saying though. Your calories were very low (too low) before and you had food cravings, now your calories are higher and you aren't, it's not the grass fed or organic. There are no compounds in grass fed, organic, grain fed, or GMO, that cause or cure food cravings.

    Just to be clear: I did not stick to 1400 cals. as a diet. That is my normal food intake without any diet, and I was not hungry or experiencing cravings with that. It is the other diets I went on that caused cravings and hunger. Lately, most of them have been low carb (like Paleo or Hyman), although Nutrisystems was a low calorie diet, and I had the cravings with that, as well.

  • DManDMan Master of Arts ✭✭✭

    There was a blog post about BP Diet on a budget.

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  • jcg3jcg3 ✭✭✭

    Your (Hoc's) $132 for 5.5 pounds of beef (including bones!) is part of the problem. That's $24 a pound!

    You should be able to get grass fed ground beef closer to $8 to $10 per pound. I can even go to Whole Foods and get grass fed ground beef for $8 per pound.

    Here are a few things I do to control costs...

    • Buy frozen beef by going directly to a farmer. I make the trip every few months and fill up my freezer - I've done quarter cows, and I've also "just" bought 50 pounds of frozen ground beef.
    • Buy kerry gold in bulk - I'll make a longer drive to go to Trader Joe's to buy 20 or 40 or 60 sticks of butter at a lower price, it stays well in the fridge for months.
    • I buy 5 pound bags of whole bean coffee from Bulletproof, and invested in some good airtight containers to hold the beans in the cupboard.
    • I buy the 3-pack of big Brain Octane bottles - that makes the per-ounce pricing more manageable. You can keep some of the smaller ones around and just refill from the bigger bottles if you want.

    Those 4 things are probably the simplest things you could do to save some money without jumping through a lot of hoops. As long as you have some space in your freezer and fridge to stock up, you can get a lot of mileage out of that.

  • jcg3jcg3 ✭✭✭

    Here's the blog post that DMan mentioned: https://blog.bulletproof.com/the-bulletproof-diet-budget-version/

    I'd also like to say congratulations on your success so far with the diet. It's great when things start to work the way they should!

    The hardest part for me was getting started. I had to learn all sorts of things, figure out what was good to buy, even where I could find certain things. After a while the shopping got a lot easier and I could start to bring the costs down a bit when I was able to get into a rhythm.

    Also, consider seasonal patterns. Right now it's the middle of winter and I can get fresh berries at the store, but it's more expensive because it is out of season. In the summer time I will get berries a lot more often because they're in season...

  • HocHoc
    edited January 2017

    Thank you all for the suggestions. I did find Kerrygold butter for $2.99 at Trader Joe's, so that saves me a little. Also, grass-fed ground beef is available for $8/lb. in a few places, so that will save some more. I checked the Wal Mart that is 10 miles away, and they don't sell fresh meat or vegetables. I'm in an urban environment, so the cost of driving to and from a farm, and the additional electricity costs plus cost of buying an extra freezer and buying meat in bulk is not going to save much, if at all. I still have 2 2/3 bottles of brain octane for the coffee-- should last another month or two, and maybe there will be another sale then. In the interim, I can buy fairly large bottles of MCT oil for recipes for around $20 on amazon. My local market sells pastured eggs for $6 a dozen, and Whole Foods about the same (though sometimes they go on sale for $5 a dozen). I noticed that Trader Joe's has some organic veggies that, while not the freshest, are certainly a little more reasonable in price. We're still going to be looking at about $20 a day for food for the two of us -- no Costco deals here -- but $600 a month is a lot better than $1,000 a month. It looks like we just have to accept the fact that, as long as we stick to the BP principles, our food budget will double. But, that's better than triple.

  • BTW, I seem to have plateaued this week on weight loss. Not a surprise, I normally expect a plateau the fourth week of any diet. The hope is that I will start to see a consisted 2 lbs. or so a week starting next week. . .

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