Continuous InnerBalance like data?

cortextcortext ✭✭
edited March 31 in Using Stress

Are there any devices that do InnerBalance like HRV data throughout the day? I'm looking at maybe something like Oura ring or lifetrak zoom hrv.... or possibly just tracking HR with something like the FitBit Alta HR. I'd love to have some sort of signal I could check to monitor stress throughout the entire day (maybe into sleep?) and have some sort of feedback that I can look at to assess how well I'm adapting.

I'm thinking this might even help dial in my diet / supplement / exercise regimen if I can spot trends in the data.

I recently had a run-in with "White Coat Syndrome" at the doc's office (high BP / high HR which is usually very low at home), and looking at the Stress Check app by Azumio, I'm at 37%. So, I'd like to get a better grip on this.

What do you guys recommend?

Comments

  • DManDMan Master of Arts ✭✭✭

    dave has a sweetbeat like app or the original app would work as well with a chest strap. the new version works with pads you stick on your chest. it is kinda cool if you have a lot of money since you need to replace those patches which is why i did not buy it. the OURA ring has potetnial but it is not exactly tracking stress afaik but trying to improve your sleep only. the technology is cool. it is just a ring but i thing the app is not quite what i want. but they might have improved yet. there is no perfect tool yet I'm afraid but I'm looking forward to that as well...

    @cortext said:
    Are there any devices that do InnerBalance like HRV data throughout the day? I'm looking at maybe something like Oura ring or lifetrak zoom hrv.... or possibly just tracking HR with something like the FitBit Alta HR. I'd love to have some sort of signal I could check to monitor stress throughout the entire day (maybe into sleep?) and have some sort of feedback that I can look at to assess how well I'm adapting.

    I'm thinking this might even help dial in my diet / supplement / exercise regimen if I can spot trends in the data.

    I recently had a run-in with "White Coat Syndrome" at the doc's office (high BP / high HR which is usually very low at home), and looking at the Stress Check app by Azumio, I'm at 37%. So, I'd like to get a better grip on this.

    What do you guys recommend?

    May you be well, may you be happy, may you be healthy, may you be loved.

    How much to eat:
    advanced | How to train: bulletproof training | HRV: HRV FOR TRAINING HRV BASICS What Affects HRV | Brain  & Memory dual n back training advanced training

     

     

  • cortextcortext ✭✭
    edited April 6

    This looks pretty close to what I'm looking for... but it's kind of bulky / expensive / not available:
    https://getlief.com/

  • DManDMan Master of Arts ✭✭✭

    yea that is almost the same as the swee beat one....

    May you be well, may you be happy, may you be healthy, may you be loved.

    How much to eat:
    advanced | How to train: bulletproof training | HRV: HRV FOR TRAINING HRV BASICS What Affects HRV | Brain  & Memory dual n back training advanced training

     

     

  • cortextcortext ✭✭
    edited April 7

    I came across this one today while looking for ways to track sitting vs standing time... kind of a novel way to track your breathing patterns / heart rate -> stress throughout the work day with your butt:
    http://darma.co/Pages/Darma Inc. - Products.html

    Although, I'm not sure if I want to sit on a bluetooth transmitter all day.

  • cortextcortext ✭✭

    This one looks close to what I'm looking for:
    https://www.zensorium.com/being#parameters

    Although, I don't see why the Oura, Apple Watch, or FitBit Charge 2 wouldn't be able to capture that data (and there's nothing on how a 24hr "zensorium" chart might look.) Hmm.

  • DManDMan Master of Arts ✭✭✭

    i hope the will add more features to the oura ring software cause the ring is my fave...

    May you be well, may you be happy, may you be healthy, may you be loved.

    How much to eat:
    advanced | How to train: bulletproof training | HRV: HRV FOR TRAINING HRV BASICS What Affects HRV | Brain  & Memory dual n back training advanced training

     

     

  • cortextcortext ✭✭

    I came across this one today:
    http://www.tomsguide.com/us/whoop-strap-2.0,review-4269.html

    "There’s a fitness gadget out there that is so hot that NBA players are sneaking it under their sweatbands, Major League Baseball changed its rules to allow it during games, and high-profile athletes such as LeBron James and Michael Phelps are touting it. It’s now available for the rest of us, too. Ryan Lochte and Michael Phelps wore it while training for the 2016 Olympics, so I’ll take their word that it is OK for swimming, as well. Underneath that unassuming build, there is a lot of activity going on. Every second, the band measures heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV), temperature, motion and whether it is on or off the wrist. This data is synced to the user’s iPhone via Bluetooth (Android compatibility is coming soon) and is used to calculate the three fundamental scores for Whoop: strain, sleep, and recovery."

    However, I'm not seeing any way to visualize the HRV data or have some sort of alert tagged when stress goes up.

  • cortextcortext ✭✭
    edited April 21

    Alright, I splurged and grabbed an InnerBalance Bluetooth sensor and a FitBit Charge 2.

    I logged 1 night of sleep on the Charge 2 (regular sensitivity) which logged 9hrs+ of sleep. I can see the difficulty now of a sensor trying to differentiate between me laying there still and trying to sleep vs me actually sleeping. In the app, it was easy enough to crop the data based on movement and when I'm quite sure I actually fell asleep / woke up (which ended up being a little under 7hrs), although this could be a pain to do every morning. I'm going to try switching it to sensitive mode for a while.

    I had another doc visit where he mentioned "Wow, your heart is pounding, go see my receptionist and ask for water and lay off the caffeine. I can write you a prescription for propranolol..." At home, I've noticed if I'm relaxed and take my BP with my feet on the floor and arm on the armrest, I measure around 90 / 60 with HR around 50. If I measure at home with feet off the floor and no arm rest, I'm closer to 120/80. At the doc's office sitting off the edge of the bed with no arm rest, I'm 132/85 with a HR around 100.

    I'm wondering if maybe potassium supplementation might be in order. I already consume lots of magnesium (400-600mg/d), I drink plenty of water (to thirst maybe 4 liters/d?), and I believe I get adequate sodium, if not a relative high amount of sodium, as I eat very low carb most of the time. I do aerobic, HIIT, and resistance training. Super annoying.

    I'm also investigating potential supplements like taurine.

  • cortextcortext ✭✭
    edited April 27

    So, around a week into the fitbit charge 2... I've gotta say, this is a remarkably uncomfortable watch. However, the data this is gathering is pretty damn cool (although, I wish it did continuous rmssd.) I'm in a weird spot of wondering if I can get used to this thing, or if I should return it. I would imagine in just 1 or 2 years, this stuff is going to be much more comfortable (or more powerful.)

    I'm not sure if it's the weight of the device, the shape, materials, the "EMF" + maybe the fat lithium battery on the wrist, or that crazy non-stop green light show on my wrist that's making this noticeably annoying. For now, I'm primarily blaming the weight and shape of the sensors. If you google the Fitbit forums, you'll actually find a surprising amount of people complaining of arthritis like symptoms. I carry low body fat, so it sort of sits directly on wrist arteries / nerves.

  • Jason MillerJason Miller Mother nature isn't stupid mod

    I've worn mine 24hrs/day for 2 years, no issues. You aren't supposed to wear it tight unless during training, should be able to easily slide your finger under the strap. For me, my arms are under sheets so I haven't noticed any sleep disturbance from the lights. Blinking lights don't cause arthritis, Bluetooth is only active when syncing data, and has severe difficulty passing through water and solid objects like human bodies.

    My Crossfit auto template programming here, body composition coaching through Eat to Perform here,
  • cortextcortext ✭✭
    edited April 27

    @Jason Miller said:
    I've worn mine 24hrs/day for 2 years, no issues. You aren't supposed to wear it tight unless during training, should be able to easily slide your finger under the strap. For me, my arms are under sheets so I haven't noticed any sleep disturbance from the lights. Blinking lights don't cause arthritis, Bluetooth is only active when syncing data, and has severe difficulty passing through water and solid objects like human bodies.

    This is sort of the fit I'm using (4th notch out on the Large band.) At this tightness, it won't fit much higher up on my arm, but relative to the other options, it's the most comfortable here. If I go looser on the band, it slides over my hand and sort of squeezes the sides -- I can push it up higher onto my arm and wedge it up there if I go 2 notches looser, but that results in a tighter fit.

    Here's the fit 1 notch "looser":

    https://community.fitbit.com/t5/forums/searchpage/tab/message?q=wrist pain

  • Jason MillerJason Miller Mother nature isn't stupid mod

    looks like the images didn't clean come through.

    My Crossfit auto template programming here, body composition coaching through Eat to Perform here,
  • cortextcortext ✭✭

    Weird, they were initially showing fine. It looks like I can't edit the comment anymore.

    Image 1: https://i.imgur.com/aqQyWjb.png
    Image 2: https://i.imgur.com/rl0LNBV.png

  • I highly recommend the Vivosmart 3 that has the Firstbeat technology built into it. It measures all day (24 hour) stress. I have had mine since the first day it was available in April 2017 and love it. Three more Garmin wearables came out in August that can measure all day stress. I have found it very accurate and helpful. It figures out your "true" resting heart beat. You only get the lowest rest category when you are close to your resting heart beat range. My life gets crazy and I am no where close to that range but I am learning what I can do to promote recovery and gradually get my heart rate back down about 10 points a week. Firstbeat has a medical grade 24-hour assessment product Bodyguard. I find I can get most of that information out of my Vivosmart but it is interesting to read about their rest and recovery discoveries with the 24-hour assessment.

Sign In or Register to comment.