TrueDark Glasses

In Dave's new book, he refers to TrueDark glasses (https://biohacked.com/product/truedarktwilight/) which he says are more effective than typical UVEX blue blockers. Has anyone tried these? (I have yet to find a single review of them online)

Comments

  • I have both the day and night versions. I think the nighttime version is truly better and more effective than my Swannies. That said, they are extremely dark. They turn everything red. I find them a bit difficult to wear for long given how dark they are. I use them about an hour before bed and they work great. The day-time ones are less obvious to me, but substantially lighter. They are a soft yellow and much clearer than Swannies. I use all 3. My daytime ones when I get home and the sun is setting. Then I switch to Swannies. Then I put on the Trudarks an hour before bed.

  • I also have the day and the night glasses. I've only tried them for a few days, but here's some initial impressions:

    TrueDark Twilight - I am wearing these as I type this review. Previously I have used an inexpensive pair of Uvex orange glasses religiously (because I like their effect) every night about 2 hours or so before bed (Uvex Skyper Blue Light Blocking Computer Glasses with SCT-Orange Lens). While wearing the Uvex, I feel comfortable using electronic screens, e.g. watching a TV show, browsing the internet. In comparison, the TrueDark are noticably stronger in blocking power and I don't really enjoy screen activities as much. It is quite hard to see at all in low light with TrueDark in comparison to the orange glasses, so be careful. Seems like the red are better suited for immediately before bed. (Perhaps I will start the night with orange and then switch to red.) One drawback of the TrueDark for me is that the frame is a bit tight fitting and less comfortable than the Uvex or regular sunglasses. (This could be specific to me and my head size.) This drawback is acceptable. However, I am a bit put off by how the TrueDark fail to cover the lower sides of my peripheral vision, even with the adjustments on the two "arms." In contrast the Uvex solve this problem simply with lens extensions on the sides. Again, this may be due to the fact that I have more deeply sunken eye cavities than most people. It is irritating to see white in juxtoposition to red at the periphery and I wonder how much this negates the blocking effect. (I am seriously considering attaching some cloth or something to remedy this.)
    TL;DR TrueDark is a strong blocker, but, in my case, I was a bit dissapointed with their fit.

    TrueDark DayWalker - I wasn't as excited by the DayWalkers as a concept, however I thought I could try them at work. It turns out that they are super nice to wear at my work where there is a barrage of gross, icky, soul-crushing garbage light. And the crazy part is you don't even really realize it until you start wearing the DayWalkers. When I first put them on I'm struck by how yellow things are, but it's not distracting and I get used to it after say a minute. While the DayWalkers are the same form factor as the Zombies, err I mean Twilights, they don't cover my sides well, but I don't really care for this use case. So the only issue I have with the DayWalkers is that they are slightly uncomfortable to wear.

    I'd be interested to hear others' experiences.

  • WalterWalter ✭✭✭

    'Normal' UVEX-glasses work fine. With this type or the Swannies you pay for the design and for the fact it is being marketed through channels like Bulletproof. There is no real benefit to justify the costs in my opinion, unless you go directly to a specialist to design blue blocking glasses custom made for you.

    Light doesn't just have an effect on the eyes, skin cells also have internal clocks. So just blocking out light to your eyes, while beneficial, is not the whole story. Above all you need to fix the source and balance it out with plenty of natural sunlight.

  • Phil_GPhil_G
    edited April 15

    @rjmccall
    "However, I am a bit put off by how the TrueDark fail to cover the lower sides of my peripheral vision, even with the adjustments on the two "arms." In contrast the Uvex solve this problem simply with lens extensions on the sides"

    Exactly this. The TruDark Twilight are nice but they don't block out the corners even when I have tried every setting on the two arms. I like the lens (dark red) - however the light that comes through in the corner kind of ruins the experience.

  • I have both glasses. I use the red glasses nightly. But it is difficult to read in those glasses.

  • I can't find them in Italy. Do you know of any food alternative?

  • Step one should be replacing any LEDs or fluorescents in your home with good old incandescents. I use 40w incandescents in my overhead lighting, and very dim "squirrel cage" style bulbs in my evening lighting. My house is candlelight dim at night. This has made more of a difference than any blue blockers I've tried.
    I do use uvex sct orange if I look at screens after dusk, and I've turned the blue gain all the way down in my TVs white balance, so the image appears very yellow.
    I use the Zenni "beyond UV" blue blocker lenses in my daytime glasses. They work quite well and make office buildings way more tolerable. After much digging I found they use a technology from Mitsui chemicals called UV+420cut, the tech is embedded in the lens material (as opposed to a coating) and is designed to block 400nm-420nm. I'm a fan. It does make everything look slightly yellow but it's a pretty, golden yellow.

    Laboratory support staff by day, personal trainer by night

  • I got the TrueDark glasses and like them. I find that wearing the day glasses makes it much easier for me to focus while using my computer.

    Also, I feel less of my eyes and head paining while looking at screens

  • tzadditzaddi
    edited August 26

    Thanks for your comment, Markdown! (Growingdown)

  • Been trying to get a hold of these. UK Shipping is $50. not paying it. :(

    Any similar product stocked in UK?

    Want the RED TrueDark Twilights B)

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