Looking for some travel advice while on specific diet

Switched over to full paleo low carb diet about five months ago and I will be traveling on an airplane next week to a place that does not have good food options. Im trying to bring as much good foods as possible with me to avoid eating bad foods for the six days I will be away. So far I have mixed nuts mct oil, protein powder and looking at purchasing some kind of on the go protein bars. Can't decide if I should just pick up a jar of ghee since its shelf stable, or just try to bring a stick of butter with me in a ziplock bag with some ice packs. Not sure if I will be able to take that on an airplane. Also, how do you guys travel with your mct oil for containers being under the 4oz rule? The bulletproof collagen bars are what I am looking at right now for OTG bars, although I have never tried them. I will be staying in a hotel, so cooking will be tough, unless I can get my hands on a skillet and grab eggs and stuff like that to cook in the room. Any ideas of anything else to bring out there with me? Most likely will have to eat hotel breakfast and go out to dinner every night, just looking for something for lunch mainly as I'm sure my co-workers will all be eating fast food most the time.

Comments

  • I just went to Las Vegas a few weeks ago and I ran out of time packing. Since I was flying Southwest and they have two free checked bags I threw all my supplements in a suitcase and ran out the door.

    I took two blocks of frozen butter, my AeroPress coffee maker, my magic bullet and my hot water maker. I had a 3oz bottle of sealed Brain Octane and a small bottle of XCT. Preground my coffee and took some stevia. And a table spoon.

    I'm sure TSA lost their minds. My husband was horrified.

    I bought some bottled water when I landed. I had BP coffee for breakfast and lunch and it was amazing. I was never once sleepy during the conference. Steady energy during long lectures, all day long. I felt sleepy on the last day when I had a cookie one afternoon.

    Take extra plastic bags to seal off the bottles for coming home. I'm glad I did.

    For regular travel, especially when not checking, I would get a small immersion blender and a smaller hot water maker.

    I ate low carb dinner at night. I saved a ton of money on breakfast, which is usually awful at hotels and always rushed. Lunch I just went back to my room and made another cup of coffee.

  • Modern Life SurvivalistModern Life Survivalist Saturated Fat Truther ✭✭
    edited April 2017

    @Crazyhorse said:
    Switched over to full paleo low carb diet about five months ago and I will be traveling on an airplane next week to a place that does not have good food options. Im trying to bring as much good foods as possible with me to avoid eating bad foods for the six days I will be away. So far I have mixed nuts mct oil, protein powder and looking at purchasing some kind of on the go protein bars. Can't decide if I should just pick up a jar of ghee since its shelf stable, or just try to bring a stick of butter with me in a ziplock bag with some ice packs. Not sure if I will be able to take that on an airplane. Also, how do you guys travel with your mct oil for containers being under the 4oz rule? The bulletproof collagen bars are what I am looking at right now for OTG bars, although I have never tried them. I will be staying in a hotel, so cooking will be tough, unless I can get my hands on a skillet and grab eggs and stuff like that to cook in the room. Any ideas of anything else to bring out there with me? Most likely will have to eat hotel breakfast and go out to dinner every night, just looking for something for lunch mainly as I'm sure my co-workers will all be eating fast food most the time.

    It is quite difficult. You'll need butter and Himalayan/Real salt for sure.

    When traveling, I have lived on Chipotle, Whole Foods, high-priced organic restaurants, and some kind of kitchen (in the hotel you're staying at), without too much difficulty. This is a real feat for me, because I'm allergic to everything and TRULY need to adhere to my diet to survive.

    Chipotle food is almost all organic and fresh, with very little chance of antibiotics in their meat. They do use tap water to cook the rice, but you're low-carb, so you don't have to eat the rice if you don't want. I do eat the white rice, and it doesn't really bother me, unless it's super sticky (which means it absorbed too much water). You could live on just eating there your whole trip, but it just gets boring. I switch between steak and chicken if I decide to eat there twice in one day, but yeah, it really does get boring eat those same spices. You could switch up the salsa you choose. On a normal day that I eat there, I usually do both mild & hot, as well as both steak & chicken. But I suppose I could control myself and just choose one, or try mild & medium (green salsa) once in awhile.

    Whole Foods is a good place to make a salad at a salad bar. You can get one on the go, or even eat it there. This is a good way to keep it light on the road. I'm pretty sure their olive oil is good, but if not, you can probably find one of the good brands of olive oil on the shelf. Since it's a grocery store, it's pretty easy to make any kind of food that doesn't need to be cooked. They have hard-boiled eggs at the salad bar, if you just want to pop a few of those for breakfast. I don't recommend the premade foods at their salad bar, because they usually have some kind of seed oil (often soybean oil, which is the worst!) mixed in. Also, they use their own conventional brand of meats I believe. The eggs are fine, though. I think the feta they use is also good (and I'm VERY sensitive to cheeses usually), which is a good way to make your salad nice and filling. Again, you can use the opportunity to stock up on supplies for whatever you take with you in your rental car or are keeping at your hotel. This could be grass-fed butter, salt, olive oil, and water (if you drink water from plastic like I used to).

    HIgh-priced organic restaurants that serve salads and grass-fed steak are obviously an option. There are usually 2 or 3 (maybe more, depending) in every major city, and maybe one in even in suburbs/small towns now. If you have enough money, you could really get to know the staff of one of these restaurants in the week or so that you spend on vacation/on business. And you will really get to know their menu as well! This is what I call the "treat yo'self" option.

    If you're staying in a town where you have friends or a kitchen in your hotel, you have a lot more options obviously to maintain your diet. You can even boil your favorite veggies and bake sweet potatoes you got at Whole Foods if you have the right kitchen equipment. If you don't have these amenities available to you, you can really survive on the above three options, though. The kitchen is also the only place where you can make your shakes with all your protein powders and MCT oil. Make sure you have a stick blender with you.

    Some more notes on what to take around with you from your trips to Whole Foods. If you can find good avocados (which is very hard nowadays, because they all seem to taste rotten to me lately), they can be extremely convenient if you're stuck in traffic or get hungry. Just make sure you have a knife and a spoon for cutting it open and eating it. Also, Real Salt or Himalayan salt make those things taste like a real treat. Roasted organic almond butter is also delicious fresh-ground from Whole Foods, usually. That is an amazing snack that can tide you over for an hour or so. Equally filling, but somewhat less convenient (because you have to open them) are roasted organic pistachios. I don't know what I would do without those. These can also tide you over for a while.

    Water is a serious issue you need to consider. You might just want to bring your water filter, or get a nice travel water filter that you trust, and use the municipal tap water to keep a supply you can take on the road. You will also need a nice glass container to take it with you to drink from. I've heard amazing things about Flaska, which supposedly structures the water it contains. I think Propur and Berkey have travel filters. If I ever go on a significant trip again, I think I'm going to just bring a glass water jug or two, go to www.findaspring.com beforehand, and figure out where the nearest spring with good reviews is, and just live on refills of local spring water. I used to live on 2.5-gallon jugs of Deer Park, but I really started to taste that plastic recently, and I've sworn off the stuff. If you do choose this, look for bottles with less "beads" of sweat on the top of the container, because this means there was some temperature convection that always seemed to make the water more plasticky. Have a cooler in your car with just 1 ice pack to help keep your water cool, or better yet, once you buy the plastic jug of water, empty it into a 1-gallon glass jug, then you won't have to worry about your water getting plasticky from sun hitting it. I was constantly fighting this problem when I used to go plastic for my water, and I do NOT miss having to be so vigilant about my plastic water getting hit by heat, cold, or sun. All three seem to do the same thing in making that water taste plasticky. I hate it!

    Okay, hope this helps!

  • @Modern Life Survivalist said:

    @Crazyhorse said:
    Switched over to full paleo low carb diet about five months ago and I will be traveling on an airplane next week to a place that does not have good food options. Im trying to bring as much good foods as possible with me to avoid eating bad foods for the six days I will be away. So far I have mixed nuts mct oil, protein powder and looking at purchasing some kind of on the go protein bars. Can't decide if I should just pick up a jar of ghee since its shelf stable, or just try to bring a stick of butter with me in a ziplock bag with some ice packs. Not sure if I will be able to take that on an airplane. Also, how do you guys travel with your mct oil for containers being under the 4oz rule? The bulletproof collagen bars are what I am looking at right now for OTG bars, although I have never tried them. I will be staying in a hotel, so cooking will be tough, unless I can get my hands on a skillet and grab eggs and stuff like that to cook in the room. Any ideas of anything else to bring out there with me? Most likely will have to eat hotel breakfast and go out to dinner every night, just looking for something for lunch mainly as I'm sure my co-workers will all be eating fast food most the time.

    It is quite difficult. You'll need butter and Himalayan/Real salt for sure.

    When traveling, I have lived on Chipotle, Whole Foods, high-priced organic restaurants, and some kind of kitchen (in the hotel you're staying at), without too much difficulty. This is a real feat for me, because I'm allergic to everything and TRULY need to adhere to my diet to survive.

    Chipotle food is almost all organic and fresh, with very little chance of antibiotics in their meat. They do use tap water to cook the rice, but you're low-carb, so you don't have to eat the rice if you don't want. I do eat the white rice, and it doesn't really bother me, unless it's super sticky (which means it absorbed too much water). You could live on just eating there your whole trip, but it just gets boring. I switch between steak and chicken if I decide to eat there twice in one day, but yeah, it really does get boring eat those same spices. You could switch up the salsa you choose. On a normal day that I eat there, I usually do both mild & hot, as well as both steak & chicken. But I suppose I could control myself and just choose one, or try mild & medium (green salsa) once in awhile.

    Whole Foods is a good place to make a salad at a salad bar. You can get one on the go, or even eat it there. This is a good way to keep it light on the road. I'm pretty sure their olive oil is good, but if not, you can probably find one of the good brands of olive oil on the shelf. Since it's a grocery store, it's pretty easy to make any kind of food that doesn't need to be cooked. They have hard-boiled eggs at the salad bar, if you just want to pop a few of those for breakfast. I don't recommend the premade foods at their salad bar, because they usually have some kind of seed oil (often soybean oil, which is the worst!) mixed in. Also, they use their own conventional brand of meats I believe. The eggs are fine, though. I think the feta they use is also good (and I'm VERY sensitive to cheeses usually), which is a good way to make your salad nice and filling. Again, you can use the opportunity to stock up on supplies for whatever you take with you in your rental car or are keeping at your hotel. This could be grass-fed butter, salt, olive oil, and water (if you drink water from plastic like I used to).

    HIgh-priced organic restaurants that serve salads and grass-fed steak are obviously an option. There are usually 2 or 3 (maybe more, depending) in every major city, and maybe one in even in suburbs/small towns now. If you have enough money, you could really get to know the staff of one of these restaurants in the week or so that you spend on vacation/on business. And you will really get to know their menu as well! This is what I call the "treat yo'self" option.

    If you're staying in a town where you have friends or a kitchen in your hotel, you have a lot more options obviously to maintain your diet. You can even boil your favorite veggies and bake sweet potatoes you got at Whole Foods if you have the right kitchen equipment. If you don't have these amenities available to you, you can really survive on the above three options, though. The kitchen is also the only place where you can make your shakes with all your protein powders and MCT oil. Make sure you have a stick blender with you.

    Some more notes on what to take around with you from your trips to Whole Foods. If you can find good avocados (which is very hard nowadays, because they all seem to taste rotten to me lately), they can be extremely convenient if you're stuck in traffic or get hungry. Just make sure you have a knife and a spoon for cutting it open and eating it. Also, Real Salt or Himalayan salt make those things taste like a real treat. Roasted organic almond butter is also delicious fresh-ground from Whole Foods, usually. That is an amazing snack that can tide you over for an hour or so. Equally filling, but somewhat less convenient (because you have to open them) are roasted organic pistachios. I don't know what I would do without those. These can also tide you over for a while.

    Water is a serious issue you need to consider. You might just want to bring your water filter, or get a nice travel water filter that you trust, and use the municipal tap water to keep a supply you can take on the road. You will also need a nice glass container to take it with you to drink from. I've heard amazing things about Flaska, which supposedly structures the water it contains. I think Propur and Berkey have travel filters. If I ever go on a significant trip again, I think I'm going to just bring a glass water jug or two, go to www.findaspring.com beforehand, and figure out where the nearest spring with good reviews is, and just live on refills of local spring water. I used to live on 2.5-gallon jugs of Deer Park, but I really started to taste that plastic recently, and I've sworn off the stuff. If you do choose this, look for bottles with less "beads" of sweat on the top of the container, because this means there was some temperature convection that always seemed to make the water more plasticky. Have a cooler in your car with just 1 ice pack to help keep your water cool, or better yet, once you buy the plastic jug of water, empty it into a 1-gallon glass jug, then you won't have to worry about your water getting plasticky from sun hitting it. I was constantly fighting this problem when I used to go plastic for my water, and I do NOT miss having to be so vigilant about my plastic water getting hit by heat, cold, or sun. All three seem to do the same thing in making that water taste plasticky. I hate it!

    Okay, hope this helps!

    What kind of a cooler have you got? Can you recommend me which one should I purchase from the list of the best coolers this year - https://foodplusice.com/best-cooler-for-the-money-buying-guide/ ? Looking the one for the road trips.

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